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growing Dwarf Moringa in pots  RSS feed

 
Judith Browning
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Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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I planted several seeds of 'dwarf moringa' from Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds late last winter.  They've been outside all spring and summer and we've been eating the leaves both raw in salads and cooked with other vegetables regularly for most of that time.  The leaves are delicious and never seemed too large to eat on these small 'bushes'. 

I just recently moved the pots into our hoop house as we had some cooler nights. Now that it's warmed up again though, they are even happier.  I cut one back and it has already sent out a lot of new growth.  I think I'll cut a couple more back severely and maybe bring one or two into the house for the winter...our winters are unpredictable and I don't think the hoop house will keep them warm enough.  I plan to bury them in straw and the ends of the hoop house will be closed in by then...I'm just not sure how much cold they can take.

Over the summer, while they were outside and because they were in pots, I watered them a lot and once or twice with fish emulsion and more than that with watered down urine (whenever some of the leaves would yellow).  The one time I watered with fish emulsion in the hoop house, a raccoon came in the night and dug into all seven pots...they survived but it was a big mess...

They are certainly tougher than I originally thought...just not sure how to help them survive winter here. 
I might even try growing them as an annual since they grew so well over the summer and they were easy to germinate.

Anyone else growing this variety in pots?  There was no genus and species on the package so I wonder if it's not really a special 'dwarf' variety but just has that ability to be cut back drastically and thrive?
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Deb Rebel
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Moringa tends to be somewhere between a zone 9 to 10b. 10b means no frost. When it gets below 70f it usually doesn't like it. Keep it from freezing if you can.

This is a tree you have to 'bonsai' to keep it smaller. Potting it and trimming it, encouraging it to not turn into a 20' tall tree, and yes you can bring it in and winter it. Mulching them in may help. The hoop will help some. Your best bet is to bring some in as it seems you're planning to do.
 
Judith Browning
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Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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Deb Rebel wrote:Moringa tends to be somewhere between a zone 9 to 10b. 10b means no frost. When it gets below 70f it usually doesn't like it. Keep it from freezing if you can.

This is a tree you have to 'bonsai' to keep it smaller. Potting it and trimming it, encouraging it to not turn into a 20' tall tree, and yes you can bring it in and winter it. Mulching them in may help. The hoop will help some. Your best bet is to bring some in as it seems you're planning to do.


Thanks Deb...I think I can keep them from freezing unless we get a rare super cold winter but I just had this thought about a frost...is it when there is actually 'frost' on something or just air temp low thirties?  I think I'll just spread them out, leave some in the hoop buried in straw, a couple in the back room and a couple in the front sunny window and see what happens.

...and order some more seed just in case.
 
Deb Rebel
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Sounds like that would cover everything then, and see what works.

I tried a Chayote this year, it's a 150 day minimum zone 9b and though our fall is being late, no blooms at all. I built a fantastic trellis for it too, it did get itself up there, but didn't grow as well as I hoped.

So in the spirit of trying to push your grow zone limits, may you do well.
 
Bryant RedHawk
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Moringa  loves the zones Deb mentioned.

In Arkansas you need either a hoop house with a doubled covering so there is an air layer between the layers or frost blankets and straw mulching up the trunk, especially in our mountains.

Zones colder than zone 7a need indoor cultivation to overwinter.


Judith, are you growing these for the leaves as food? they are an amazing nutritional green.
The best nutritional values come from 2 year and older trees and they take coppicing supper well since once the root system is established they grow quite quickly.
You can cook them just like you would fresh beans or even greens.

Redhawk
 
Judith Browning
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Judith, are you growing these for the leaves as food? they are an amazing nutritional green.
The best nutritional values come from 2 year and older trees and they take coppicing supper well since once the root system is established they grow quite quickly.
You can cook them just like you would fresh beans or even greens.


Definitely for food...as I said above, we've been eating the leaves all spring and summer both raw in salads and added to rice and cooked vegetables.  We love the taste and want to keep growing them even if I have to start new seed each year.  I've been cutting them back to harvest but realized I could do that more heavily and they bounce right back...at least while it's this warm.

I probably won't try to double up the cover on the hoop...will probably cut them back drastically and in the end bring them all in...I have a lot of straw to cover but who knows what this winter will be like?  Might leave one out there as a test...even dig into the ground maybe.

I hadn't heard that two year old trees have more nutrition in their leaves.  thanks...
 
William Bronson
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This is very encouraging!
I has always wanted such trees but was discouraged by the zone issues.
I wouldn't even mind rather big trees indoors, nice decor.
Would artificial lighting be needed?
 
Judith Browning
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Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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William Bronson wrote: This is very encouraging!
I has always wanted such trees but was discouraged by the zone issues.
I wouldn't even mind rather big trees indoors, nice decor.
Would artificial lighting be needed?


I'm going to try without artificial light although I bet they would love it.  I've had them in a fairly sunny spot outdoors all summer and now full sun in the hoop house.  Looks like they thrive on the heat and light.  I hope I can cut back the ones I bring indoors and they'll go dormant for a bit and then recover again when I put them back in the hoop...then in the yard.  I think it sounds like a lot of moving around but I discovered that our dolly works great for rearranging big potted plants.  Just one big experiment 

If the leaves didn't taste so good I probably wouldn't go to so much trouble...

Now, I have my toona sinensis seeds in some coir stratifiying in the door to the refrigerator....that tree should be able to grow outside here...doesn't sound as tasty though...'burnt onions' flavor leaves?
 
Steve Farmer
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Judith Browning wrote:I hope I can cut back the ones I bring indoors and they'll go dormant for a bit and then recover again when I put them back in the hoop


Moringa goes dormant for about 5 mins when you prune it.
I've germinated these on a windowsill and then put them outside in the ground. When I've left it more than a few days indoors they grow tall and straggly I guess suffering from lack of light. I'd advise giving them as much light as poss. Maybe after multiple haircuts the growth will calm down a bit and could be ok indoors. Let the soil dry out between waterings.
 
Judith Browning
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Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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Steve Farmer wrote:
Judith Browning wrote:I hope I can cut back the ones I bring indoors and they'll go dormant for a bit and then recover again when I put them back in the hoop


Moringa goes dormant for about 5 mins when you prune it.
I've germinated these on a windowsill and then put them outside in the ground. When I've left it more than a few days indoors they grow tall and straggly I guess suffering from lack of light. I'd advise giving them as much light as poss. Maybe after multiple haircuts the growth will calm down a bit and could be ok indoors. Let the soil dry out between waterings.


hahaha...that's what I noticed when I cut back the one in the third picture above...I thought it would set it back and I think it took about a day to notice buds forming.  That pic is in less than a week.  I was hoping once it cools down they won't be so peppy?

so, less water and I'll stop feeding them over the winter.

I'm trying a cutting from what I pruned off of the trunk...it is making little white spots on the surface of the cutting that is under water.  Not even sure this is possible but it's doing something?

Lucky that you have the climate to grow them outdoors... thanks for the information.
 
Deb Rebel
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Judith Browning wrote:

I'm trying a cutting from what I pruned off of the trunk...it is making little white spots on the surface of the cutting that is under water.  Not even sure this is possible but it's doing something?



Those are root callouses. It is heading in the right direction. Some things water propagate, from softwood (that is what your cutting would be considered)
 
William Bronson
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Well one person's burnt is another person's caramelized .
Good luck with toon!
 
Woody McInish
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Over the summer, while they were outside and because they were in pots, I watered them a lot and once or twice with fish emulsion and more than that with watered down urine (whenever some of the leaves would yellow).  The one time I watered with fish emulsion in the hoop house, a raccoon came in the night and dug into all seven pots...they survived but it was a big mess...


Thanks for that tip. I have several coon baits for my 'live' traps, now I have 1 more. The coons get to live until I get up and shoot them with my pellet gun.
 
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