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Growing in different zones

 
                        
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Hello,

Im new here and new to the entire idea of permies. I was wondering if there is information here or else where that someone has stumbled upon that talks about growing certain plants in different zones. Like growing thornless marionberries or self fertile Kiwi's(Both are Zone 6) in a zone 3. Any links etc would be greatly appreciated! Thanks

Westco
 
steward
Posts: 7926
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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First of all, the "National" USDA Zone maps are rather generic.  If you can find a state map (check with your County Extension Agent), it is much more detailed.  There are many microclimates which do not show up on the small scale (national) maps which will show up on a local area map.  You could actually be in zone 4 (or 2!).

Just as there are mild winters, there are also the opposite, which may push you into a colder zone once in a lifetime.  With a little effort, you can often "fool Mother Nature" by 1 or 2 zones, but 3 zones (30° F) is pushing your luck.  The more artificial measures you take to cheat the system, the further you wander from "sustainability" and "permanent".
 
pollinator
Posts: 4437
Location: North Central Michigan
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your hardiness zone is the bottom number range of where most plants will do ok and your heat zone is the top number range where they will be ok concerning heat.

a plant that says it is hardy to zone 6 likely won't grow in zone 3..so you'll be throwing away your money..trust me...I live in a zone 4/5 combination and if I plant a zone 5 plant I am giving it a wing and a prayer putting it in..generally they do OK..but I have lost a lot of plants..

some hardiness maps have us in zone 5, some 5 b and some 4 and most winters if we have a normal winter with good wet snow cover everything is alright..but when you get a cold windy winter with thin snow cover..you can lose plants faster than scat !! so disappointing..there was a 10' white pine that didn't make it over this winter..probably wind burn when it was -30..

some plants can be grown in a greenhouse in a lower zone, and some can be grown in a microclimate in a lower zone, like up against a south facing wall with some protection over the winter of maybe some hay sandwiched between some chicken wire..but you are taking a chance even then with 3 zones difference
 
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Location: SE Michigan
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Check out Paul's article on Sepp Holzer permcaulture: http://www.richsoil.com/sepp-holzer/sepp-holzer-permaculture.jsp

Pretty introductory, but he has a video where he talks about growing citrus. And that's somewhere that gets very cold in the winter. There are ways to do what you want.
 
                            
Posts: 126
Location: Ava, Mo, USA, Earth
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When people ask me what zone I'm in, I aske how expensive of tree are they talking about.  I've seen cold snaps where the low was -23F, and that is I think zone 4, but the maps say zone 6.  Most years we only have a few days below zero.  Have you lived at your site long enough to know how low of temps you can expect?  Add a zone or two for plants on the sun-side of the house that are protected from the wind.

I planted a fig this year that probably would die back to the roots most years.  I've been told that if I put enough mulch over the roots and chickenwire filled with leaves as high up as I care, it should do well.  But, as I said, this is a new project and I don't know if it will work.
 
My honeysuckle is blooming this year! Now to fertilize this tiny ad:
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