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Propagate from cuttings  RSS feed

 
pollinator
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I am compiling a list of plants that I can root cut.  I finished planting a bunch of willows last week.  I think Willow is pretty amazing but I have a feeling not everything is going to be quite so easy. 

Please, feel free to add to the list!

Keep in mind you will have more success propagating if you cut the right wood at the right time.  Dormant/ Not Dormant and Hardwood/Softwood.  With fruit like apples be aware that a cutting will not have the same rootstock as the mother plant so the cutting is not really a clone.

Rooting hormone is suggested for some propagation.  If you have willow you can use that as a rooting hormone.  I think Willow must be from another planet it is seriously vigorous.  It’s like the comfrey of deciduous trees.  The following list is not exhaustive, not even close.

Almond
Apple (you may want to graft)
Apricot
Basswood
Birch
Blackberries
Black Currant
boxwood
Blueberry
Citrus
Crabapple
Elderberry
Elm
Fig
forsythia
Goji Berry
Gooseberry
Goumi
Honey Locust
Honey Suckle
Jostaberry
Maple
Mulberry
Pear
Quince
Raspberry
Red Currant
Roses
Russian Olive
Taxus
Willow (I just put the cuttings in a bucket of water September and October and planted after three weeks in a bucket)  The cuttings pushed roots and leaves…keep them in a shady area.)
 
Posts: 76
Location: Rainy Cold Temperate Harz Mountains Germany 450m South Facing River Valley
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forsythia
taxus
boxwood
work well

apple, maple, and blueberry havent worked for me without hormones or bottom heating. Arent marigolds annual? and saint johnswort maybe by root division? its pretty soft stemmed.

i think you might have a few more options and sucess layering a plant than producing a root from a cutting. (I have cooler summer temps it would be a reason why they fail) I haven´t heard of maple cuttings taking root ever, but maybe because they are common trees that grow fast so no one tried. my japenese maple will not root anyway, I tried heaps. you can buy organic root hormones that help and are safe, but I have had no luck with willow water, it seems to just go foul. Asprin helps some as well maybe because its more concentrated and also sterile and has nothing edible for bacteria in it.
 
pollinator
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Josta berry and gooseberry
Almond so I have been told
 
Scott Foster
pollinator
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Arent marigolds annual? and saint johnswort maybe by root division? its pretty soft stemmed.

I looked up the Marigold and though there are perennial varieties they wouldn't be in my zone, probably not a good fit for the list.   

Regarding St. Johnswort there are different kinds, some types are herbaceous and some are woody. I know this because you made me look it up   I took it off the list because I think most would think of it as a herbaceous medicinal.
 
David Livingston
pollinator
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Quince

David
 
Scott Foster
pollinator
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David Livingston wrote:Quince

David




Thanks ,it's on the list now.
 
pollinator
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Goumi and elderberry
 
pollinator
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For those in warmer climates - passion fruits, moringa, tree collards, sweet potato, cassava...
 
Posts: 69
Location: Manila
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Very nice - my kind of thread.
Basil. Mint, Rosemary, Citrus, Bougainvillea, Succulents, Gardenia, Ixora coccinea (West Indian Jasmine).
I had some success with all - herbs are easy, the rest are touch and go but we all get lucky now and then.
 
pollinator
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Surprisingly a lot of folks don't know that tomatoes root easily!  One year I lost almost my entire crop of 500 plants to a late freeze, but I had a few plants left in a cold frame.  I let these grow, cut off all the "suckers" and tips for cuttings, and had almost my entire planting back, it was just two or three weeks later to produce!
 
pusang halaw
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Alder Burns wrote:Surprisingly a lot of folks don't know that tomatoes root easily!  One year I lost almost my entire crop of 500 plants to a late freeze, but I had a few plants left in a cold frame.  I let these grow, cut off all the "suckers" and tips for cuttings, and had almost my entire planting back, it was just two or three weeks later to produce!


I've managed to get 4 or 5 tomato cuttings to root but got hit by white fly infestation. Out of more than 20 tomato plants last September-November 2017, only three managed to fruit. Really small too, as though they were cherry tomatoes when they were the regular grocery variety.

I've read that cuttings were as 'old' as the mother plant - in your experience do they fruit sooner?
 
Alder Burns
pollinator
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I don't recall whether the tomato cuttings flowered as if they were still on the plant, rahter it seemed that they acted like seedlings the same size.  Maybe if I had been able to disregard the time it took for them to root and then get established after planting out it would have been different.  Also most of them were from the "suckers"...the small sprouts that form where the leaves meet the main stem and I think these often flower later than the main stem anyway.
 
gardener
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Here are some plants to add to the list. These can all be just stuck in the ground though some are more successful than others. I have grown all of these using this method.

Black Cottonwood
Snowberry
Seaberry
Red Osier Dogwood
Pacific ninebark
Salmonberry
Red flowering currant
Spirea (Hardhack)

I'm currently testing growing beaked hazelnuts from cuttings just stuck in the ground (livestakes). I soaked them in a willow water mix first and then stuck them in the ground in small bunches of several cuttings. That was done several months ago and so far the cuttings are still alive but I don't know if they have rooted yet. I'm waiting till summer to see how they grow before saying if it worked or not. Tried it last year without success but I did not use a willow water mix and I got them in the ground late in spring.

Some others that can be grown from hardwood cuttings. All of these are native plants found in Western WA.

Western Yew
Hairy manzanita
Snowbrush
Oceanspray
Orange honeysuckle
Black twinberry
Osoberry
Mock Orange
Pacific rhododendron
Roses (at least the native ones in Western WA)
Thimbleberry
Blue elderberry
Red elderberry
Evergreen huckleberry
 
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