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Tree species for western washington.

 
Jesus Martinez
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Hello everyone,

I have a couple of questions:

1. What evergreen tree species besides western red cedar, doug fir and hemlock grow well and fast and will produce usable wood for building things east of everett wa at about 700-800ft elevation.

2. Where could I procure such species either seed or starts.

I don't plan on using the wood for firewood, and mostly only intend to reforest part of my 5 acre property. Ideally I would like to be able to use some of the wood for various small construction projects when they get big enough. I'm mostly interested in growing things that grow fast and/or produce expensive lumber in the event that I don't do anything with it but my kids might want a cash in.

Thanks!
 
Jonathan 'yukkuri' Kame
Posts: 488
Location: Foothills north of L.A., zone 9ish mediterranean
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Bamboo.
 
Jesus Martinez
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Bamboo is a problem for us here because it quickly becomes an un-removable invasive pest.
 
Jonathan 'yukkuri' Kame
Posts: 488
Location: Foothills north of L.A., zone 9ish mediterranean
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raindog wrote:
Bamboo is a problem for us here because it quickly becomes an un-removable invasive pest.


Right.  I couldn't imagine why anyone would want a perpetual stand of incredibly strong, light, fast growing timber that happens to be deliciously edible.  Invite asian friends over in spring, and they will gleefully cut back the new shoots, maybe even cook for you.
 
                    
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Myself, I think one ought to be careful when choosing plants to grow if they are not indigenous to the local area. I don't believe bamboo "fits" into the PNW. I believe there are a couple varities native to the SE USA, but am not certain.

One could probably assemble an fairly extensive list of things like that that have had unintened results.



Sitka spruce?    Silver Fir?  Maybe start a potential Christmas tree farm? 
 
Jesus Martinez
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There are a lot of Christmas tree farms where I am, I don't think it would generate much income as they are all much larger than I could plant out.

Also, I agree with yukkuri in that bamboo could be an excellent plant, but I don't want it to invade everything. I am very bad at maintaining things and something that spread like bamboo would eventually take over a lot of things because I wouldn't maintain it well.
 
Dave Miller
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Location: Zone 8b: SW Washington
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Try poking around here: http://www.wnps.org/
 
Jesus Martinez
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That gives a great list of species, but no method of procurement. Does anyone know a good source of trees for this area?
 
Dave Miller
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Location: Zone 8b: SW Washington
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raindog wrote:
That gives a great list of species, but no method of procurement. Does anyone know a good source of trees for this area?

Your conservation district has an annual native plant sale (which just happened): http://snohomishcd.org/plant-sale

Also:
http://www1.co.snohomish.wa.us/Departments/Public_Works/Divisions/SWM/Work_Areas/Outreach/Native_Plants/plantnurseries.htm

http://www.kingcounty.gov/environment/stewardship/nw-yard-and-garden/native-plant-nurseries-washington.aspx

 
                              
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I live south of raindog by roughly 100 miles.  Have you tried Weyerhaeuser?  They have at least one nursery, and probably more up around the Rochester area.  They do sell to the public, and if memory serves, they have an annual sale on seedlings-can't remember when.
  Lot of independent tree farms down this way.  Two owners I know have planted a species of redwood that is hardy for this area.  Noble fir is another choice, and then there is always alder.  And alder makes wonderful firewood!
 
Jesus Martinez
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Thanks,

Weyerhauser seems like a good place, .25-.55 cents per tree.
 
                              
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If for some reason you happen by Chehalis over the weekend there is a garden show at the Yardbirds shopping center.  One of the participants in there was giving away free Noble and Doug Fir seedlings.
 
Paul Cereghino
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Location: South Puget Sound, Salish Sea, Cascadia, North America
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fourth corner nurseries out of bellingham is one of the best bare root wholesale native plant growers around--no bias here .  There are lots of weyerhauser type growers producing forestry stock.  Don't know the everett area.  You want lowland seed source from your rough latitude.

In the lowland hard to beat doug fir for pretty wood and cedar for durability.  Other exotic or native hardwoods might be worthy for specialty timber.  I noticed you are thinking about market value.  I imagine it really depends on why and and how you bring it to market.  Spacinng and pre-commercial thinning are important to get clear grain.  Check out

http://www.vashonforeststewards.org/
http://nnrg.org/

 
Vickie Hinkley
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Location: Toledo, WA
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conundrum wrote:
I live south of raindog by roughly 100 miles.  Have you tried Weyerhaeuser?  They have at least one nursery, and probably more up around the Rochester area.  They do sell to the public, and if memory serves, they have an annual sale on seedlings-can't remember when.
   Lot of independent tree farms down this way.  Two owners I know have planted a species of redwood that is hardy for this area.  Noble fir is another choice, and then there is always alder.  And alder makes wonderful firewood!


their brochure:
http://www.weyerhaeuser.com/pdfs/businesses/westernseedlings/SeedlingSalesProgram.pdf
 
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