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Apartment permaculture  RSS feed

 
Adrien Quenneville
Posts: 61
Location: Alexandria, ON, Zone 4a
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I have this large plant pot that used to house a small palm tree inside my living room. Palm tree died, dried up, I hid it behind the couch in shame.

Then I found permies.com, with its discussions on soil building and hugelkultur, and was inspired.

Mid February, suffering from the winter blahs, I took the palm tree, cut it up in many pieces, buried them in the plant pot. That night we had spaghetti squash, and I planted the seeds in that pot. Seedlings are already 1ft long.

Week later, bought another pot and more soil, planted snap peas. And thus started our mini-garden.

The other pot has pepper seeds in it but so far nothing coming out.

I know the squash plants will be huge, so it is my intention to let them grow a bit more, pick out the strongest 2 or 3 plants, and chop'n'drop the rest.

Should get some money back on taxes this year, might invest in more pots and soil. Ideas?

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duane hennon
gardener
Posts: 722
Location: western pennsylvania zone 5/a
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one small step for man, one giant step for mankind  ,

it's good to know the palm tree didn't die in vain

there are a number of videos on the internet showing growing systems for windows and balconies
 
John Polk
steward
Posts: 8019
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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Especially in an apartment environment, some growing GREEN will take the edge off of winter.  It will also give you a sense of purpose and responsibility.  If your endeavor yields you something to eat, all the better!
 
Andrew Michaels
Posts: 75
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So will those spaghetti squash and snap peas actually produce fruit indoors? Are you using a grow light or just window light?
 
Adrien Quenneville
Posts: 61
Location: Alexandria, ON, Zone 4a
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Window light and the light post that is in the background (crooked silver thingie), and as for producing fruit, I plan on manually pollenizing the flowers myself, so at this stage it is still an experiment.

I live quite far north, in the summer months we have 18-19 hours of daylight, so lighting shouldn't be an issue...
 
            
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Check out self-watering planters such as the earthbox.  www.earthbox.com  It provides an ideal growing environment.
 
Jonathan 'yukkuri' Kame
Posts: 488
Location: Foothills north of L.A., zone 9ish mediterranean
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Peas don't need so much light, but squash tend to be greedy for sun, soil, water and space.  Lettuces don't need a lot of light and are one of the more expensive vegetables per pound at the supermarket, if you are interested in decreasing your food bill.  Many herbs grow well in small containers, and fresh herbs make all the difference in a meal. 

Not exactly apartment permaculture, but indoor growing:
http://www.metacafe.com/watch/1027672/garden_girl_tv_indoor_garden_part_one/

 
Burra Maluca
Mother Tree
Posts: 9473
Location: Portugal Zone 9 Mediterranean Climate
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I think light might become a bit of an issue - some of those seedlings already look like they are desperately trying to reach a better light source.  Can you see how long and straggly some of them are?  I wonder if there's any way you can get them closer to a window or something...
 
Dan Wallace
Posts: 41
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Can't believe it took that many posts but YES, your seedlings don't have enough light! Its not easy getting sufficient light indoors without resorting to artificial means. Houseplants are one thing, they generally have low light requirements, but fruits and veggies mostly require full sun. How about a local community garden? Or if there's not one, you could find some land and start one
 
Adrien Quenneville
Posts: 61
Location: Alexandria, ON, Zone 4a
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Indeed, the squash seedlings are actively looking for light, but the peas are doing quite well so far.

I've got the lamp pointed towards the seedlings, will update on the progress.
 
All of the world's problems can be solved in a garden - Geoff Lawton. Tiny ad:
paul's latest kickstarter
https://permies.com/t/65247/permaculture-design/permaculture-design-alternative-technology-live
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