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What is it.... the game! Post unknown objects to ID... and to stump others!

 
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Holding the nail for the first whack?
 
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Backwards thinking eh? It now makes sense. I have seen this on more modern hammers but like you said without the steel balls and facing the other way.
 
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Yep!


cheney-hammer.jpg
[Thumbnail for cheney-hammer.jpg]
 
Drew Moffatt
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I suppose this was before they could magnetise a specific piece of the head or insert a shatterproof magnet hence the balls and springs.
 
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Oh! Oh! Oh!!! I wannit!!! No more smashed thumbs!!!
 
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Carla Burke wrote:Oh! Oh! Oh!!! I wannit!!! No more smashed thumbs!!!

I don't use a lot of nails (I usually screw around!), but I have used a pair of needle-nosed vice-grips to hold the nail on days when I just don't trust myself not to whack me (usually when I'm tired and should have taken a break, I admit.)
 
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Jay Angler: I do that too, and I also use needle nose pliers of any sort to hold tiny nails straight while I whack them, keeps them going exactly where I want them.
I usually use vice grips for bigger nails (I have some 4 and 6 inch needle noses that work great for that) and regular needle nose for small things as I can get them out faster and easier.
 
Jordan Holland
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Drew Moffatt wrote:I suppose this was before they could magnetise a specific piece of the head or insert a shatterproof magnet hence the balls and springs.



They definitely had magnets that would have worked back then, though they weren't as strong for their size as modern rare earth magnets. They might de-magnatize from the constant beating of the hammer faster, though. I believe they had those little magnetic tack hammers back then, so the concept was there, they just went another route. Maybe two balls, two springs, and a screw were cheaper than a magnet back then, too? I have found some of the modern hammers lacking in this feature. I have seen the magnet not properly aligned and the nail-head channel not cut flat with regards to the nail-head's top, resulting in nails falling out or being launched into low earth orbit when being set. You are limited by the strength of the magnet, so when you get up to about 20d, it can't hold it as well as a smaller one, and you cannot swing as hard to set it. This mechanical system will hold any nail that will fit the system, and you can swing as hard as you want. Yes, you do have to flip the hammer around, but that's not a big deal, as most of the time I imagine people would have set nails by hand, and use this system just for driving nails out of reach or when the other hand was needed for some other purpose. I think this is a good example of how good ideas are not guaranteed to succeed by virtue of their own merits, and how big a roll marketing/public opinion can have on success.
 
Carla Burke
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Pearl Sutton wrote:Jay Angler: I do that too, and I also use needle nose pliers of any sort to hold tiny nails straight while I whack them, keeps them going exactly where I want them.
I usually use vice grips for bigger nails (I have some 4 and 6 inch needle noses that work great for that) and regular needle nose for small things as I can get them out faster and easier.



This is exactly what I do, now. But, it would be nice to not have to!
 
Jordan Holland
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I'm not sure of the techniques you have tried, but in case you haven't experimented with different things, there are some things you can try to prevent smashed thumbs. It can vary due to the hammer design and nails used, of course. First, if the hammer head is of the old adze-eye design like this one, it can have quite a large face on the SIDE of the head, and you can use this to set nails rather than the much smaller poll. Also, I find the most natural way of holding a nail between the tip of the thumb and tip of the index finger is not good because your fingernails are sideways, and much more vulnerable to a strike. You might try holding nails like you would short roofing nails (like a cigarette). You can experiment with different locations between different fingers to see what works best, or at least to choose a less important part of your hand to smash, lol. And how hard are you hitting the nail to start it? Maybe you are swinging too hard. It doesn't take much to start a nail. Multiple small blows can do the same work as a single harder one. And how do you swing the hammer? I wouldn't swing the same way as sinking a nail. I would use a snapping motion, kind of like snapping a whip. When the hammer head is just about to make contact, your hand should already be starting the rearward motion. That way, if it misses, your hand should automatically catch it before it makes much contact with your fingers. Hope this can help someone.
 
Gerry Parent
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Hi Jordan,   Boy, we sure do need you to post more what-is-it photos because afterwards we get such a great history and background that I find very educational and helpful ! Thank you for your contributions!  
 
Jordan Holland
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Gerry Parent wrote:Hi Jordan,   Boy, we sure do need you to post more what-is-it photos because afterwards we get such a great history and background that I find very educational and helpful ! Thank you for your contributions!  


Thank you, you are too kind. I was inspired a while back when I first read through Pearl's thread on tools for women. I never would have considered that people might not know how to use simple tools, like a hammer. As was covered there, it seems simple tools are so simple that people don't see the need to teach the most basic instructions on how to use them. Unfortunately, this is not new, and many old tools' proper uses have been lost to time after they fell into disuse, like scythes and broadaxes. We are now re-learning many of these things. I'm planning on doing a series of videos and posts on using simple tools, specifically geared toward explaining the most simple, basic, and over-looked aspects of them. The devil truly is in the details most of the time. I would like to propose maybe looking into a special place for how-to posts and threads for tools. It looks like most tool info would now fall under the one place in "homesteading". I think organizing a how-to section for tools would be a good resource for beginners to homesteading and permaculture to peruse and learn everything at once, or if someone needs to use a tool for the first time, they could go straight to the how-to section to find out. Also, if there is a strong section on tool use, it could draw people here from outside of normal permaculture circles, because tools are universal. Just brainstorming.
Staff note (Pearl Sutton) :

Adding a tool use forum to our possibles list! Thank you!

 
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I just found this thread and a very entertaining and educational evening was had while canning up some sweet corn. I definately have some whatsits that deserve to be named but thought I would shed some light on Pearls humingbird stake first.
Now I wasn't able to track down an image for you but it was part of a bird feeder with a tray/plate/bowl in front a loop to slide over the head and it would have had the birds body and wings as a counterbalance on the other side. A neighbor had one when I was a kid it was fascinating.
 
Pearl Sutton
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Shea Loner wrote:I just found this thread and a very entertaining and educational evening was had while canning up some sweet corn. I definately have some whatsits that deserve to be named but thought I would shed some light on Pearls humingbird stake first.
Now I wasn't able to track down an image for you but it was part of a bird feeder with a tray/plate/bowl in front a loop to slide over the head and it would have had the birds body and wings as a counterbalance on the other side. A neighbor had one when I was a kid it was fascinating.


Thank you!! I gave up on it, and have it holding up a tomato plant :D
I'll look at it again when it comes out of the garden later in the fall :D

And we want to see your whatsits!! :D  (that's hardly a polite thing to say!!)
Welcome to Permies :D

:D
 
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My friend posted these pictures on facebook, wondering what this is. Anyone have any ideas?






(You can click any of the images to make them bigger)

Thank you!!!
 
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Looks like a serving dish.
 
Pearl Sutton
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It's made to serve or bake something specific that is either oily or sticky, to keep it up off the bottom. Or something that rolls around and needs to sit still.  Personally, I'd use it for something along the lines of egg rolls, so they stay crisp, or pastry that has a sticky glaze. Still thinking.
 
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is it the size of an ear of corn?
 
Shea Loner
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Tereza Okava wrote:is it the size of an ear of corn?


Second that. A serving plate for corn on the cob.
 
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What are the dimensions?

Is it small enough to be a soap dish?

My first thought was a butter dish like for stick butter.

The ridges make it look like a soap dish to me.
 
Carla Burke
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The size is key, on this one. It could be a butter dish, a soap dish, or a cotc dish
 
Anne Miller
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I had another thought that maybe it is the lid of a covered refrigerator dish?  Like this:



source - Square Refrigerator Container With Lid


It is not a good image but the best I could find.  See the handles?  If it is bigger than that it might be the lid for a serving dish.

I couldn't find what I was thinking of but I did find these options, only the first one looks similar to it:



Source - Relish Tray




Source _ Indiana Glass Handled Pickle Dish




source Pickle Dish






 
Jay Angler
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It does look a lot like my friend's corn dishes - I don't think corn was as long 50 years ago as it is today, but yes, size matters!

It does seem a little rounder than hers though, so I'll wait to get a size estimate before considering more options!
 
Carla Burke
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The more I look at the shape, the more it takes me to my paternal grandma's holiday tables, where a dish like that would have been for serving olive, pickles, pickled beets, etc, that were too strongly flavored, too big, or even too 'show stopping' to put into a combined relish dish, or, for more modest serving, where a single item would be served, rather than a variety. The ridges were to lift the food above the juice, to help keep the table neater, upon serving.
 
Anne Miller
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I really enjoyed looking at all the pretty glassware collection.  I tried to find the manufacture by going by the pattern.  I didn't have any luck finding that piece.

Thanks for the memories.  I saw lots of luncheon plate set, relish trays, punch bowls like I inherited from hubby's grandmother and my grandmother.  Lots of pink glassware like my mom had.  When we sold our homestead it all was sold in an Estate Sale.

I have a salt + pepper shaker set and a little dish that I am not sure what is was for unless it was a place setting to wash your fingers in after a dinner party. It is about that size.
 
Nicole Alderman
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I've got measurements!

My friend was actually posting the images from HER friends post

my friend wrote:
I had told her it looks like it’s for corn on the Cobb, she has 6 of them, but doesn’t think that’s what it is. I told her I was curious so I was going to post pictures and see if anyone on my side knew.

She posted the measurements. they are 8.5” long 4.5”across and about 1.25” tall but has a rectangular base about 3/8” thick. The bowl is curved and 4 ribs running length. I feel they have something to do with food. Maybe someone will solve the mystery



I'm now a bit confused. Are these bowls, or is something else that goes along with them?
 
Jay Angler
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This is close: https://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/vtg-relish-dish-deco-art-glass-early-496740531



They just call it a relish dish.
 
Carla Burke
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It's a relish dish, for pickles and such.
 
Drew Moffatt
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So it was raining and I was trying to look busy this afternoon.
Found a couple of things for you all.
Starting with this.

It's supposed to be razor sharp at the point but it's been bouncing around in a toolbox.
IMG20200910171931.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG20200910171931.jpg]
IMG20200910171945.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG20200910171945.jpg]
IMG20200910171951.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG20200910171951.jpg]
 
Carla Burke
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Looks, to me, like a leather stitching awl.
 
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Nicole Alderman wrote:My friend posted these pictures on facebook, wondering what this is. Anyone have any ideas?






(You can click any of the images to make them bigger)

Thank you!!!



I wonder if it's an ashtray?
The indents on each end remind me of one but I found nothing comparable online.
 
Jay Angler
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Carla Burke wrote:Looks, to me, like a leather stitching awl.

That's what I thought, but in a quick search I couldn't find one like that on the web and I'm not sure where the "thread" would go unless you put it through the hole each time. I suppose if it goes through together, you can withdraw the sharp core, push the leather binding through then withdraw the outer part to pull the leather binding through?
 
Drew Moffatt
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I did find an old awl but knew that would be too easy.

You're on the right track kind of.
Minus the thread.
 
Carla Burke
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So, it's a leather hole punch, rather than a awl? Whereas an awl would make a hole, it won't necessarily leave it with an 'open' hole? Sort of the predecessor to the more modern belt/rivet/grommet punch?
 
Tereza Okava
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Judith Browning wrote:[
I wonder if it's an ashtray?


It reminded me of a cigar ashtray, but... she said there was a set of multiples? Although I suppose if it came from an old hotel or something multiples would be possible.
 
Jay Angler
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Drew Moffatt wrote:I did find an old awl but knew that would be too easy.

You're on the right track kind of.
Minus the thread.

OK, I vote for using it to putting ear tags on cattle (or maybe pigs).
 
Jay Angler
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OK not quite - it looks more like a "trocar" - https://myvetsupplies.com/product/trocar/
Ouch - glad I don't have bloat!
 
Judith Browning
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Are there two holes in the outer part? across from each other?
If so I'm wondering about running something through them and then the sharp tip will split whatever it is as it's pulled through? or less likely form a hole?

If there is only one hole I'm at a loss  
 
Drew Moffatt
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Yes!

A trocar and cannula for bloated cattle.
The one time I've needed this I was way out the back so I just used my pocket knife. You guys are too good.
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