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Rattlesnake repellant? :)

 
Savannah Thomerson
Posts: 78
Location: zone 6
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I plan on bringing in guinea fowl soon. Other than that (assuming the guinea will be somewhat effective) what else can I do to keep these rattley fellas away?
 
Shawn Bell
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I'm not sure how the mongoose would work out with farm animals, but I know they hunt snakes.
mongoose-fighting.jpg
[Thumbnail for mongoose-fighting.jpg]
 
Brice Moss
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Location: rainier OR
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Shawn Bell wrote:
I'm not sure how the mongoose would work out with farm animals, but I know they hunt snakes.


please don't let a mongoose loose anywhere they are not already running wild they have the potential to be a realy nasty invasive species
 
Tim Canton
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I've heard that black king snakes eat rattlers and copper heads but probably not enough to control a rattlesnake population.    Maybe just having a large number of other snakes in the area would reduce food and drive them off?

I have also heard that some larger poultry will deter them and some small dogs can be taught to hunt them I believe.
 
John Polk
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Wear good boots and gators until you solve the problem.  Then get prepared for an invasion of mice/voles.  The guineas probably won't get rid of them, but will drive them towards the edges.  Better than nothing.
Rattlers are more frightened by you than you are of them.  Make noise when moving through 'their' territory, and you'll probably never see one..  They go well with wild rice and a good white wine.
 
Savannah Thomerson
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Location: zone 6
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Ha! I'll keep that dish in mind

I need to let go the irrational fear I have of snakes. I really would love to make peace with them, but they....*cringe*.....surprise you. I think it's the shock factor that irks me more than the snakes themselves.

Hopefully the guinea will help out a lot (if we can ever find any).

It's lookin like I'll have my tall rubber boots on all summer long
 
John Polk
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That;s why I suggest making a lot of noise as you walk through unknown territory.  If they hear you coming, they will scatter.  They are terrified of humans...I guess the feelings are mutual.
 
Jordan Lowery
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i always walk around with a small stick in rattlesnake season. even if i happen to end up close to one, a slow swing of the stick near them they will go after the stick giving you a chance to get away.

that being said, its far better to just be cautious and aware of your surroundings. also take note in the birds calls for snakes as most of them have an alarm call.
 
paul wheaton
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I think the way to get rid of venomous snakes is to make sure you have hundreds of non-venomous snakes.  The non-venomous snakes eat all the snake food. 

People that are killing their garter snakes are just begging nature to send in another species of snake.

 
Savannah Thomerson
Posts: 78
Location: zone 6
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paul wheaton wrote:
I think the way to get rid of venomous snakes is to make sure you have hundreds of non-venomous snakes.  The non-venomous snakes eat all the snake food. 

People that are killing their garter snakes are just begging nature to send in another species of snake.




Aye, very true. I've spent a lot of time looking through local snake images trying to familiarize myself with what's poisonous and what isn't.

It seems the head shape and eye shape give it away. The patterning seems to be a lot alike though -- grayish/brownish with some sort of pattern. Either way - I would never hang around long enough to kill a snake anyways I don't believe

A few years ago, I was living in Florida - outside kneeling on the ground mulching around some fruit trees. I reached down to grab a handful of mulch and ---eeeek!---- the mulch in my hand was slithering! agggh.

Fortunately in Kentucky, only 4 of the 30-some snakes are poisonous.

We also have a lot of weeping willows around the property and the house which I've heard rattlesnakes love. Eh, oh well, we'll see. I believe as soon as we get some guineas in here they will really tend to the situation well. And when I go for walks, I'll put on my tall rubber boots and focus on not sending out a fear vibration through the woods

Thanks again everyone~
 
                                      
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tyffdavi wrote:
Aye, very true. I've spent a lot of time looking through local snake images trying to familiarize myself with what's poisonous and what isn't.

It seems the head shape and eye shape give it away. The patterning seems to be a lot alike though -- grayish/brownish with some sort of pattern. Either way - I would never hang around long enough to kill a snake anyways I don't believe

A few years ago, I was living in Florida - outside kneeling on the ground mulching around some fruit trees. I reached down to grab a handful of mulch and ---eeeek!---- the mulch in my hand was slithering! agggh.

Fortunately in Kentucky, only 4 of the 30-some snakes are poisonous.

We also have a lot of weeping willows around the property and the house which I've heard rattlesnakes love. Eh, oh well, we'll see. I believe as soon as we get some guineas in here they will really tend to the situation well. And when I go for walks, I'll put on my tall rubber boots and focus on not sending out a fear vibration through the woods

Thanks again everyone~


From your location I am assuming that you have timber rattlers.  I have those around here as well, and even though the area that I'm in is sort of a hotbed for rattlesnakes, I have only seen one.  Granted, I've only lived here for two years, but the one I saw was a small one, and a helper of mine had just killed it. 

The best way to avoid getting bitten by a rattlesnake is don't try to pick it up.  Sometimes this is unavoidable, as in your slithering mulch story.  Most of the time they will just sit there all still and wait for you to pass by.  Their camouflage is excellent as well, and it's entirely possible to step on one, but you may get a warning if you get too close.

I have heard that guineas are good for dealing with snakes.  I have also heard that geese, goats, and pigs are efficient as well.  King snakes eat venomous species, and non-venomous species as well.  Hopefully your birds work out for you!
 
R Hasting
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Location: Mineola, Texas
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I hear that rattlers are repelled by lead if you come across one and he wants to tango.
Shovels work too.
 
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