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Doing paper - the role of Archaea in repairing deficient soil microbiome, grateful for feedbacks  RSS feed

 
Rich Nebitt
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Hi all - I'm doing a research project/paper on the role of Archaea in repairing soil microbiomes.  ANY feedback on your knowledge of this newly discovered organism and soil, or how to culture in soil, etc would be much appreciated.  Thanks -  rich for Kim Corner Farm Club
 
Miles Flansburg
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Howdy Rich, I did a quick search for Archaea and here are some threads that came up.  Maybe some of them will help?


Archaea Threads.
 
Krofter Young
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The work of Rudolf Steiner might be a good place to start - founder of biodynamics in 1924.  He was very tuned in to the quantum level.  If you want to know how microbes function, it helps to have a handle on the quantum aspects of the micro and the macro.  http://erdakroft.com/Erdakroftfarm/Blogs/Entries/2017/8/8_A_brief_introduction_to_biodynamic_farming.html
 
Bryant RedHawk
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The members of Archaea can feed on many different items that are considered pollutants, most operate in stagnant waters in nature but many members can be found in places like oil saturated soils, they are aerobic in nature.
Most of the ones we read about are cultured in vitro where conditions can be monitored and controlled because they are being raised to take care of things like oil spills.

In the soil they can remediate many of the pollutants found in farm fields (pesticide and herbicide residues, fertilizers as well as the drips from farm equipment.
In the soil world, they are one of many organisms that work interdependently with most of the other organisms, they will be found in large numbers in places of high food sources (for them) and low fungal concentrations.
Some of the members of this genus feed on beneficial bacteria that take care of making minerals available to fungi and then to plant roots. There are quite a few studies out there but take note of the specific organism each study is written about, they all don't act the same.

Some of Steiner's formulas stimulate growth of some of the species of Archaea we want to be living in our soil.  Many of his interaction ideas have been proven recently and others are still under scrutiny by researchers.

Redhawk
 
Evan Nilla
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This is really interesting like, Acharya Kanad, do you have any links to the science data that has proven Steiner's work?? Sorry to hijack the thread. Archaea, isn't there a commercially available strain used for pesticide/herbicide/fungicide?? Don't remember which..

Bryant RedHawk wrote:The members of Archaea can feed on many different items that are considered pollutants, most operate in stagnant waters in nature but many members can be found in places like oil saturated soils, they are aerobic in nature.
Most of the ones we read about are cultured in vitro where conditions can be monitored and controlled because they are being raised to take care of things like oil spills.

In the soil they can remediate many of the pollutants found in farm fields (pesticide and herbicide residues, fertilizers as well as the drips from farm equipment.
In the soil world, they are one of many organisms that work interdependently with most of the other organisms, they will be found in large numbers in places of high food sources (for them) and low fungal concentrations.
Some of the members of this genus feed on beneficial bacteria that take care of making minerals available to fungi and then to plant roots. There are quite a few studies out there but take note of the specific organism each study is written about, they all don't act the same.

Some of Steiner's formulas stimulate growth of some of the species of Archaea we want to be living in our soil.  Many of his interaction ideas have been proven recently and others are still under scrutiny by researchers.

Redhawk
 
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