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Akiko Ike's Boro/Sashiko embroidery

 
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I thought for sure there was a thread here on 'boro' itself...I found references in other threads.  If it exists could merge this.

I like the scale of her work with the thick yarns....and the colors!

Excerpts and photos from AlyZen Moonshadow


Akiko Ike of Niigata, Japan, is a gentle, unassuming lady with immense talent in the Japanese art of Sashiko embroidery. Her technique is not strictly Sashiko, it encompasses and incorporates the principles of Boro, and the stitches she uses are identical to Indian Kantha, or running stitch.



Chiku chiku is an onomatopoeic word coined by Akiko herself, which emulates the sound made by the yarn she uses going in and out of the cloth. You will notice that her stitches are bold and huge, and she uses thick yarn to sew her stitches.







 
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That last phoo is really neat! It seems o be scraps joined in a patchwork? Are they sewn together and then the embroidery added, or does the embroidery join them? More info for this sewing illiterate would be appreciated!
 
Judith Browning
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hi Jennifer, I forgot about this thread and always intended to come back and add more information.  
Thanks for popping it back up

I'm not sure about Akiko Ike's methods but Boro is usually stitched to a ground fabric (clothing most likely) by hand, piece by piece as patches are needed.
I think the quilt in the first post was done by stitching piece by piece to a backing fabric and then the (boro?) 'quilting' over all.

I love the shades of old indigo in many of the more traditional boro pieces.

Here's a link to one site that seems to have more traditional boro examples and explanations https://www.sewingmachinesplus.com/sewblog/authentic-japanese-boro-boro-mending-boro-inspired-patchwork/

Authentic Japanese boro

Boro means, literally, “tatters.” These were made by repurposing carefully saved garment pieces and other handspun and indigo-dyed fabrics. They were sewn together as a patchwork built up from many layers providing extra warmth.





 
Jennifer Richardson
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Ooh, I love the look of the “rag woven” garments in that video! Weaving is on my four-mile-long list of things to try when I get the time!

The sashiko stitching is so simple but very attractive.

Here is a modern take I found where a girl repairs the knees of her jeans:

https://honestlywtf.com/diy/diy-sashiko-boro-denim-repair/


I like the look of her project quite a bit!
 
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