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Late fall/winter honeyflow plants for zone 7

 
pollinator
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Location: Upstate SC
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This time of year in zone 7 in SC, the bees have a very limited selection of plants to visit. The only native tree in bloom right now is the witch hazel, but it is a small shade-living tree bearing a relatively small number of flowers and there are none to be found growing on or near my property.  But I have a large (20' high x 30' across) Eucalyptus neglecta growing on my property that is covered with 100's of blooms from mid Nov through New Years that is buzzing with bees on any day that is warm enough for bees to fly.  Do you know of any other plants that are blooming now and are popular with honeybees?
 
steward
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Location: woodland, washington
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I've heard good things about Tetradium daniellii. invasive ivies are reliable around here (on the other side of the continent).
 
pollinator
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Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
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Henbit or maybe purple dead nettle is blooming here in Missouri, 6B. Can't remember how to tell them apart.

We've got a few dandilions.
 
pollinator
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The sasanqua camellia and the fragrant tea-olive (Osmanthus) come to mind.
 
pollinator
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Location: Ashhurst New Zealand
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In my neck of the woods (southern North Island NZ, maritime temperate) our best winter-flowering bee plants are the native koromiko (Hebe stricta) and tagasaste. The koromiko flowers profusely throughout June and well into July most years, and when it's done the tagasaste is starting to bloom. Both are heavy nectar producers and popular with honeybees and bumblebees as well as native pollinators. Not sure how hardy they'd be in SC but definitely worth a shot if you can source them.
 
master pollinator
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Location: Officially Zone 7b, according to personal obsevations I live in 7a, SW Tennessee
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Ken W Wilson wrote:Henbit or maybe purple dead nettle is blooming here in Missouri, 6B. Can't remember how to tell them apart.

We've got a few dandilions.



Henbit grow upright. I say that dead nettle is henbit's lazy cousin-she likes to lay down, root at the nodes. and her hat (flower top) is always askew. Pics here, not mine. http://www.survivallandusa.com/Lamium-Amplexicaule-Henbit-Dead-Nettle-Edible.html

Both are also edible. Enjoyable in a mixed salad, and when paired with spicy-hot ingredients. The best parts are the top 3 inches or so, when the flowers have just opened.
 
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