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Coyotes  RSS feed

 
Posts: 10
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Hello again everybody,
   Well again im reaching out to my permies family in need of ways to help keep coyotes off my property.
.    My aunt down the road at the end of my fields dog was attacked tonight by a coyote and I'm scared that they will come down this way and try fooling with my ducks and chickens.  Although I do have the in the barn but I haven't fixed every small hole in it..... I do have a German shepherd and a bird dog/brown Doberman (according to vet) who have free patrol all through the night via doggy door and both go out together. So I guess I'm asking if any of yall have prior experience with coyote problems what did ya try and outcomes. I'm open to anything except traps and snares I have these but we have too many pets to use this method.


Thanks to all,
Zack


Also I've attached a picture of my babies  😊
And a picture of a 4.25 ounce ginseng too I found this past year and replanted here on my property!!
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Posts: 244
Location: Northern New Mexico, Latitude:35 degrees N, Elevation:6000'
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I've lived in coyote country nearly all my life..."aside from a few years of city living", and the one thing that keeps the coyotes at bay....big dogs.  In particular big dogs with strong herding instinct.  The one breed we had that actually kept any coyote from daring step foot on the property was a Maremma.  The Maremma we had was female, and she would actually charge out into the fields at night when the coyotes got too close, and run em off.  I think it was only the young coyotes that would test her boundary, because the older ones had already learned to stay away.
 
gardener
Posts: 1667
Location: Middle Tennessee
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I've got coyotes around also, but I don't have any dogs, yet. I do use a portable electric net style fence which is easy to move so I can get my chickens on fresh grass regularly. I have not lost a chicken to any four legged predators since using the electric fence.
 
gardener
Posts: 1504
Location: Virginia (zone 7)
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We have plenty of coyotes around here. So many that our local co-op has "coyote contests" each year and awards prizes for the most killed and the biggest killed.

We make sure anything that will attract them is either put up securely at night or kept well away from the house.

Our dairy farmers keep a donkey in the field with their cows. The donkey will guard the herd from coyotes. I wonder if a donkey would protect ducks and chickens.
 
pollinator
Posts: 54
Location: Zone 4, SD
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Coyotes surround me and during the one year I had only one mid sized female dog, they came into the yard frequently and were always trying to lure her out to an ambush.  Her being part German Shepard helped her not fall prey to their tricks I think.  She only has 3 working legs but is fearless and very smart.  

When I had a partner living with me - he peed the perimeter of the property and that seemed to keep all of the potential  predators at bay - racoons and skunks as well as Coyotes.  So send all men out to pee on the trees.

When mu partner left, I started having problems with just the one dog.  A radio going in the goat/chicken barn area and bottle rockets were my only other weapons.  Laugh, if you want, but they worked.  Now I have an un-neutered male dog working with my female and I have no coyote problems.  Everyday until he was six months, I walked him around the perimeter getting him to pee on as many trees as possible every morning and night.  Once I was sick and saw the female take him on that walk.  2 years later and the two of them make that circle every morning and night all by themselves.  Once he got trained not to eat the chickens and not to chase the goats, I haven't had any problems.  He is half Chow, a quarter Malamute and a quarter Wolf.  Amazingly, I m pretty sure that my smaller female is actually braver than he is, but the two make a pretty good team.

So immediately - a radio may help buy you some time.
 
Posts: 211
Location: near Athens, GA
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Eastern coyotes are very aggressive and smart.  A few years ago, I took my little border collie for a walk that went a bit late.  We were coming home down a trail in the Appalachia mountains of NC around sunset.  Suddenly, we were absolutely surrounded by coyotes.  They circled us as we walked, coming in closer and closer.  They certainly intended to kill us.  They were smart and aggressive.  My dog could not scare them off.  They intended to exhaust us.  Thank God, I carry.  I had a little .38 on me.  When They got bold enough to come in close enough so I could see them clearly, I began shooting.  I only had a revolver full of bullets.  As we walked home, the coyotes circled and ... I guess "swarmed" would be the right word... multiple times.  I would shoot one or two and they would retreat... then come back.  Had we not reached home, they would have worn us out and I would not be typing this.  Eventually, we made it home.  The coyotes ran around the house and on t eh porch... sounded like horses....  Now, I trap coyotes!
 
pollinator
Posts: 109
Location: Saskatchewan
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In my experience coyotes are not overly aggressive, although I have lost a few cats to them.
When I was a kid we had a small 20lb ish dog that could keep the coyotes out of the yard by barking at night. I think the barking is the key to keeping coyotes away, they don't have to come close to know that that territory is claimed.

This summer I had chickens in coyote tight tractors. I know they were coyote proof because one morning I found a coyote poop right beside the tractors.

So that is what works for me, barking dogs and well secured poultry.
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gardener
Posts: 431
Location: Sierra Nevadas, CA 6400'
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Where in the world are you located? As Wj mentioned, Eastern Coyotes (Coywolves) are an entirely different breed. They have the strength and power of wolves, with the scavenger instinct and lack of fear of people of coyotes. They are much, much larger and more aggressive than their western counterparts.

I only have experience with Western coyotes, and they are pretty easy to keep away. Put all trash away. Keep a dog. They'll usually leave you alone. I have no experience with Coywolves, but I have heard that guns are the only thing to keep them away. I suspect some electric fencing with some bait might do similar.
 
Wj Carroll
Posts: 211
Location: near Athens, GA
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That experience was in the mountains of NC, near the Blue Ridge Parkway. They are big, aggressive and very smart in the southeast.  They devastate native wildlife and put a lot of pressure on livestock and pets.  It is incredible how much they eat - I believe the average is around 70lbs of meat daily, per each.  They hunt constantly and their numbers are very high.  What they do to deer is awful.  Not only do they kill most fawns, but the pack will exhaust and kill even a big buck.  They also kill dogs.  I'm surprised they haven't killed any kids yet - probably will when the deer populations dwindle.
 
pollinator
Posts: 518
Location: Missouri Ozarks
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To the OP:

You don't have to worry about the coyotes coming down your way.  They're already there.  They're everywhere.

A few small holes in your barn, if they are indeed small holes, will probably not pose a problem.  A coyote is rather big.  (Raccoons and such, though...)   Your concern should be for when the birds are outside.  Be especially cautious at dusk and dawn, and all the hours in between.  Coyotes are smart, and they'll find a weakness and exploit it.

Fencing, to physically keep them away, is a good idea.  A dedicated guardian dog is good too.  Dogs that can go in and out at will won't cut it.  Heck, this past summer we had a coyote coming into our front yard to try to nab chickens, with our dog asleep on the porch 20 feet away.

I understand your aversion to trapping--you don't want to accidentally catch a dog--but you might consider doing a little coyote hunting.  (Permie cred: reduces predator pressure, gives you a salable product [hide], and provides meat for your birds.  There is especial satisfaction in that last bit.  Stacking functions!)
 
Posts: 78
Location: Appalachian Mountains
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I live in southwestern North Carolina and the coyotes (coywolves) are a big problem here.  They can easily jump a six foot fence.  They now inhabit the entire east coast from Maine down to Florida.  They also hunt in packs and take down big game, cows, horses, etc.  I worry so much for my goats, and always have my dog out with them during days and try to keep a lookout myself.  At night they are locked into a secure barn that nothing can get in.  My chickens were being decimated by other critters but the four roosters I have left are smart enough they started coming in with the goats at night and roosting in their barn, which has kept them alive.  

One dog alone is prey, two sometimes keep them run off.  Some farmers have entire herds of livestock wiped out in a single night, it is a big problem.  They especially go after goats and sheep.  I think keeping several guardian dogs (big ones) is the answer.  A donkey is a good guardian, but one alone could not fend off a pack of predators.  I've not seen a single deer this year and they are usually everywhere, and I think the coyotes have decimated them.  
 
gardener
Posts: 5440
Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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hau Zack, I would not let those dogs do the patrolling for coyotes, they might be able to handle a solo yote but if the pack comes around, the dogs will die.
I have three dogs, one pit bull, one boxer mix and one Catahoula Leopard dog which is bred to hunt wild boars. I call them into the fenced yard or into the house when the coyote pack starts their nightly patrol.
One neighbor had a pack of six LGD dogs and the yote pack got them all one night.

Triple runs of electric fence with a high joule energizer will stop them as will heavy gauge wire tall fences but if they want in they will get in.
Our hogs and the donkey, along with the dogs barking back at the coyotes seems to keep them from wanting to come on our land.
If they ever do show up, I have my .308 sniper rifle ready for them.

Our Coyote hunting club got one not long ago that was the size of a wolf (Hung over the 4 wheeler rack at front shoulders on one side and the back legs were off the rack on the other side).
 
zachary welch
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Thanks all for the advice..... I can hear them howling in the distance on quiet nights not sure what would have brought them in that close that night
 
pollinator
Posts: 1102
Location: Los Angeles, CA
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A 30.06 works pretty well.  

Growing up in rural Kansas, the entire community came out on New Years Day morning, jumped in their trucks, got on their CB's, and went out coyote hunting.  I'd sit in the back of Dad's truck all bundled up and if we got a pack of coyotes flushed out into the field, we'd drop them with hunting rifles.

I know a farmer in Oregon who uses llamas to guard his sheep herd.
 
gardener
Posts: 836
Location: western pennsylvania zone 5/a
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and now to stir the pot

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/why-killing-coyotes-doesn-rsquo-t-make-livestock-safer/

Why Killing Coyotes Doesn’t Make Livestock Safer

There is no clear evidence that lethal control works to reduce human-predator conflict. It can even make the problem worse
 
master pollinator
Posts: 197
Location: Illinois USA - USDA Zone 5b
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We have a good sized pack of German Shepherds here. Thus far the coyotes have not dared set paw on our property. Between the fencing backed by a pack of intense big dogs, I think they would rather go elsewhere.

Now that cougars have reportedly returned to Illinois, however, I suspect we will have to re-evaluate our predator defense at some point. Our males are 100 plus pounds. Our females are 70+ pounds. As a pack they are pretty intimidating to coyotes. Cougars ... I don’t want to risk losing my fur kids to a big cat. But that risk is likely still some years away.
 
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