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Today it was so cold...  RSS feed

 
master steward
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...that I sneezed while shoveling the driveway, and my sinuses were so frozen that only ice and blood went out into the air.  It froze in an icy mist that gently covered the snow in front of me.   I observed it for a few seconds, trying to think bout how cold it would have to be for such a thing to happen.








... then my dog began to eat it!


I finally decided to wear the scarf my wife made for me a few years ago.


 
Craig Dobbson
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Today was so cold that the moisture in my breath condensed and froze my mustache to the a fore mentioned scarf during the outdoor chores.  I had to wait near the wood stove for a few minutes just to get free from my frozen clothes without losing hair.   LOL 

-21 F


   
 
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I grew up in Oregon, not near as cold as Maine, but cold enough.  Frozen bloody sneezes?  OWWWCHHH!!  Wow.  That's nuts.

I lived along many years in the country, in a house I heated only with wood.  I'd work all day, and then get home and have to get that fire going immediately to get things reheated.  Took several hours - then the golden hour.  But I used to joke it was so cold when I got home that I had to prop the refrigerator door open to heat the house.

What I actually had to do to deal with cold all my Oregon life was wash a dishes a lot.  To warm my hands.  Then do a dry task, then go back and wash dishes.  It's practical.

Now, my husband and I are living in the hyperarid So Cal desert.  It was 70 degrees a couple days ago...68 on Christmas.  I've never gone so long in my life not being cold.  It's so cold that... um, yeah, it's not very cold I think it froze once since we've been here.  It's awesome, and I'm a convert to warmer climes. 

The only part I miss about snow is seeing the dogs play in it!  One dog I had would run with her face totally under the snow like a snow plow, sniffing for rodents.  Totally immersed.  It was hilarious.

Thanks for sharing your "it was so cold that"...
 
Craig Dobbson
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Here's a picture of my canine snow plow from when he was a baby.  He's three years old now, 90 pounds and much more efficient at moving snow than when I first got him.    Still a big baby though.
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Maremma Sheep Dog
 
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I'm at the other end of that spectrum Kim, living in SoCal for 10 years now, and while convenient to be in summer clothing the entire year it is rather boring. Yesterday was the coldest of the week, 74F, was low to mid 80 the rest of the week. Any time there is more than 0.1" of rain (hasn't happened since Feb 2017 now) in a day, the locals freak out, crazy drivers flipping their cars.

I know it will be a ton of work when I move north of Spokane WA in 5-6 years and build my place and a RMH, but it will be nice to have 4 real seasons again, and live around people who know what rain and snow is!
 
Kim Goodwin
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Craig Dobbson wrote:Here's a picture of my canine snow plow from when he was a baby.  He's three years old now, 90 pounds and much more efficient at moving snow than when I first got him.    Still a big baby though.



Craig, that is so funny!  My snow plow dog is a St. Bernard/Black lab mix, and she looks exactly like a black Great Pyrenees (if there was such a thing).  Cold looks like an non-issue for your sheepdog!  Heat was a big issue for my miss snowplow, and my parents decided they could keep her in Oregon, where she is undoubtedly happier than being in a desert.
 
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Doing morning chores, my right eye started to tear up, then the excess moisture started to freeze.  It took me a couple seconds to realize what was going on.  I tried to blink away the 'fogginess,' then realized that it felt like a glassy covering over my eyeball, then finally realized my tears were freezing.  I had to shut my eye and hold my hand over it for a few seconds to thaw it back out, then I was able to quickly blink away the excess tears before they refroze.  Happened again that afternoon.  Crazy.
 
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We have an English Mastiff puppy that I'll put up against any dog in the doggie-face-snowplow race.  Although she just turned a year and doesn't look to puppyish anymore.  My pitbull, on the other hand, is not enjoying this weather in the least...

I pick up my new Alabai puppy in March.  I've seen video of it's parents playing in the snow.  The new puppy may give the Mastiff a race...

Forgot to add, -19 is the coldest I have recorded at my house this year.
 
Kim Goodwin
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Seem to be a lot of rare dogs in this community, fascinating!

Eyeballs freezing over - OUCH.  That's nuts.

Does anyone remember the Laura Ingalls Wilder books, and I think it's in The Long Winter, where Pa has to go wipe the noses of the cattle, lest they freeze over and suffocate?  That's when they are in the Dakotas.  Is that for real?  Can cattle suffocate that way?
 
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So cold my mustache freezes to my beard so I can't open my mouth.  On the other hand the beard is good insulation.  It was -44 At my shop on Saturday.
 
Craig Dobbson
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Today it was so cold that both of this years' roosters woke up with black tipped combs and wattles. Frostbite is just a fact of life for chickens here.  It's just a matter of how much and how well they deal with it.  I've never lost a bird to frostbite.  I have lost a few to stupidity though.  During a blizzard a few went for a walk and didn't come back to the coop.  I found them in the spring, frozen against my woodpile and under my porch.  Not the smartest critters, but plenty useful for eggs and pest control.  :)

 
Craig Dobbson
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Today was so cold that my gloves froze after they got a bit wet, and I couldn't get enough grip to open my front door.  I took the glove off and -without thought- stuck my semi-moist hand directly to the metal handle of the door.  And that's where I spent the next 30 seconds, contemplating my stupidity.  Thankfully, it's a cheap handle and it warmed up quick enough for me to keep all of my skin. I'll be adding a rubber coating to that handle in the spring or replacing it with a  less dangerous one.
:)
 
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On a very cold morning, in the great white North, about 30 years ago, I recall exhaling and noticing that the moisture from my breath fell to my feet in a little ice shower.

Colder than a witch's tit.
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Colder than a witch's tit
 
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Today it actually wasn't that cold.  It's been warming up the last few days to something like minus 10 Celsius.  The roads have been dry and clean since it was so cold (minus 28 C was the coldest we had that I saw). 


I was driving to work this morning though, and the road was frosted.  Not so much frost that you could see it.  A deer on the road.  Me, wanting to avoid hitting the deer, swerved slightly.  Going to fast.  Didn't sleep that well last night or the previous, so my reflexes and thinking was probably not quite right.  Quickly out of control on the frost.  Fished and tried to re-correct, but it was no use.  Cross the road, into the ditch, upside down, and back on the wheels, both airbags deployed.  Everything had gone into slow motion: too much crap in the car tossed about me like in  a snow globe; very surreal.  Lucky though.  Only minor scratches and a bruised ego.  Neighbor just drove me home. Called my boss on the way home to let him know the car is a write off and that I'm taking the day off.  I'll wait a bit and get someone to drive me to the clinic to get the Doc to check me out.   Might be more, but at this point, probably just a little shock. 
 
Todd Parr
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Roberto pokachinni wrote:Today it actually wasn't that cold.  It's been warming up the last few days to something like minus 10 Celsius.  The roads have been dry and clean since it was so cold (minus 28 C was the coldest we had that I saw). 


I was driving to work this morning though, and the road was frosted.  Not so much frost that you could see it.  A deer on the road.  Me, wanting to avoid hitting the deer, swerved slightly.  Going to fast.  Didn't sleep that well last night or the previous, so my reflexes and thinking was probably not quite right.  Quickly out of control on the frost.  Fished and tried to re-correct, but it was no use.  Cross the road, into the ditch, upside down, and back on the wheels, both airbags deployed.  Everything had gone into slow motion: too much crap in the car tossed about me like in  a snow globe; very surreal.  Lucky though.  Only minor scratches and a bruised ego.  Neighbor just drove me home. Called my boss on the way home to let him know the car is a write off and that I'm taking the day off.  I'll wait a bit and get someone to drive me to the clinic to get the Doc to check me out.   Might be more, but at this point, probably just a little shock. 



Holy cow Roberto, glad you're okay.  Sounds like it could have been much worse.
 
Roberto pokachinni
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My mom says to me:  "That deer was probably thinking:  'another one bites the dust!" " 
 
Roberto pokachinni
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Thanks Todd.  Yeah it could have been a lot worse.  I realized as I came back home with my neighbor that my glasses came off in the tumble and are in the car.  Obviously I don't need them too badly, but I'll have to grab them on the way to the clinic if they aren't broken.
 
Craig Dobbson
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jeez Roberto!  Glad you're somewhat alright.  Be safe out there.  Deer are such a beautiful pain in the ass.
 
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I was winter camping about 35 years ago and it was so cold I pulled my hudson bay blanket over my head during the night.  Had to have help in the morning to get near the fire to thaw it out.... it was totally frozen across my face.
 
Dale Hodgins
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We have had some cold weather here on Vancouver Island. I had to scrape my windshield once. It even got below freezing, in the middle of the night a couple times. Luckily, it warms up a bit in the day.

I'm a fan of layering clothing. I like the sweater sandwich. Put on a shirt, then a sweater, then another shirt over top. This provides insulation and a windbreaker. I have a couple light jackets and a very heavy one. They work much better with a sweater sandwich beneath.

I haven't worn anything you could call a proper winter boot, for probably 20 years. When we do get a bunch of snow, I usually go to my leather work boots, because they're the ones most likely to keep my feet dry. That's the main winter challenge here. It doesn't have to be super cold outside, to be uncomfortable, if you're soaked.
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I've been advised that this is my nicest sweater. It's hard to wear it out, if it's inside a sandwich
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On a really cold day, I have done it two sweater sandwich
 
Roberto pokachinni
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I'm a fan of layering clothing. I like the sweater sandwich.

I'm all about the sweater sandwich.  I skip the regular shirt on the inside, and go straight into some wool.  Mine is often several thrift store sweaters, and I start  against the skin with a very thin marino wool sweater.  This is followed by a layer of heavier wool or two, and then something more durable and more shell like.  This shell is often heavy duty cotton, or leather if I'm working, since these are resistant to the demands of heavy spark loads from grinders and welding splatter.  I work outdoors and I'm often kneeling on a block of steel.  So when it's really really stupid cold, like when it was minus 25 C plus the wind, I also add a battery operated heated vest (Milwaukee, Dale!-you'd love it).  I put the vest between the two layers of heavier wool.  Sometime when it's warmer then that, I put the vest on between the thin wool and the thick wool, with just a shell layer and it functions quite nice.

I haven't worn anything you could call a proper winter boot, for probably 20 years.

  My winter work boots are good to minus 45C, but God help getting your feet warm again in that much insulation if you get your feet sweaty and then they get cold.  I let the other guy sweat with the grinders, and I do the welding.  But with the welding, I just sit there, and the cold penetrates as I lose heat, and I could be sitting a long time to do the job; hence the vest.  Since I am small in stature and mass, the vest has been a real blessing of a boost in keeping me warm.

If I was joking I would say something like:
"Today It was so cold when I pissed the stream froze and shattered as it hit the snow." 

Some days it is actually cold enough out that my tires are squared off on the bottom from cold induced pressure loss.  Doesn't happen that often, thankfully.  :)    
 
Dale Hodgins
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Just read about the roll over. Welders carry some dangerous stuff. Lucky you weren't run through.

My 73 Ford, had very thick bias ply tires that went thumpity thump on cold mornings.
 
Roberto pokachinni
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Just read about the roll over. Welders carry some dangerous stuff. Lucky you weren't run through.

Just plain lucky in general.  Was in a neck brace for a couple hours while I had initial assessment and multiple upper spine X rays; but all (except for a few minor scrapes and abrasion burns and aches) was well in the end. 

I was in my commuter car on my way to the work yard, so I didn't have my welding truck.  Very thankful for that.  You are right; the welding trucks have propane systems, and oxygen systems, and the one that we are driving right now has acetylene as well.  The latter is extremely volatile. 
 
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today was so cold (ontario canada) -25*C (-11*F) the bodies of frozen squirrels are falling from their nests in my trees....the back looks like a graveyard with many little mounds...one is stuck to the snow, so i'll have to get a different shovel and dig under him for disposal... I'll leave the little brick-like bodies in a pile away from my yard, although i'm fairly sure if they were merely in hibernation dormancy, they'd wake up once having hit the snow on the ground??   they'll likely be food for the coyotes now, it's that cold.
 
Julie dwire
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Roberto pokachinni wrote:I'm all about the sweater sandwich.  I skip the regular shirt on the inside, and go straight into some wool.  Mine is often several thrift store sweaters, and I start  against the skin with a very thin marino wool sweater.  This is followed by a layer of heavier wool or two, and then something more durable and more shell like.

 

I do this as well all the time. I have a lot of High quality natural fiber, cashmere/merino from second hand stores as people assume merino will itch, all the sweaters I've bought have been new...as if they where gifted items then donated right away, most with the tag still on. I spend so little that I have everything dry cleaned and I keep em for years.
Extra fine wool or cashmere against the skin, then a layer to keep in the warmth, then a shell.
 
Roberto pokachinni
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today was so cold (ontario canada) -25*C (-11*F) the bodies of frozen squirrels are falling from their nests in my trees..

  I've heard of this happening.  Poor buggers haven't adapted properly to their own environment.   Around here, the local squirrel variety, lives deeply underground in a network of tunnels insulates their nests, and only comes out once in a while in the winter to gather from various food storage locations. 

It was so cold today that my tongue stuck to the flagpole at school... again.    :)   
 
Dale Hodgins
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"I triple dog dare ya." Ralphie from A Christmas Story
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Roberto pokachinni
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Yeah.  That was the reference.   :)
 
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Julie dwire wrote:today was so cold (ontario canada) -25*C (-11*F) the bodies of frozen squirrels are falling from their nests in my trees....



Weird...  We routinely have that sort of weather and our squirrels stay where they're supposed to (and presumably remain unfrozen).  I would think that if they're in their nest they wouldn't be able to fall out even if they did freeze solid.  I guess it's survival of the fittest. 

My chickens have frostbite on the bigger combs/wattles but are generally perky.  Tonight's supposed to get down to -18F.  Good times....
 
Todd Parr
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I had -23 last night.  My chickens are the same.  Some frostbite, but they seem to be doing fine.  Canadian squirrels must not be as well adapted as ours.  Ours are running around.
 
Roberto pokachinni
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Canadian squirrels must not be as well adapted as ours.

  Hey, Hey, now; we'll have none of this my squirrel is better than your squirrel sort of talk.  You know the rabbit hole that that can go down in a hurry.  ;)
 
Craig Dobbson
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I'll take a frozen tree squirrel over a deer frozen in the headlights, any day. In Maine, critters stay out of the road, cuz we don't swerve unless it's a moose.  It's your best bet  for survival in that situation :)

Somehow porcupines seem to be rather road-dumb as well. 

 
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Last night my wife made me install this:
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in the chook wagon...
 
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While y'all get that polar vortex on the East Coast, we've been praying for snow over here on the West Coast. This time last year, I was shoveling feet of snow off my truck every morning to hit up (yet another) pow day on the slopes. Still waiting for enough snow to open up the whole mountain this year :( This year… well we haven't had snow on the ground for half a month, and even then it was only a couple inches that lasted no longer than a week.

So it goes.
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Last Year
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Last Year
 
Craig Dobbson
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Today it's so cold that everyone gets a swearing pass for the day.  I usually have a rule about being polite and not using crude language in the house. But today... I let it slide when the little one said "shiiiiit!, it's so cold!".   I was like " yup... pretty fucking cold, Kiddo." 

It's that cold.
 
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It's cold enough:
We are defrosting our freezer in winter, by setting all the frozen contents outside where they will stay frozen (in coolers for wildlife protection)
and putting hot pans/kettles of water inside the empty freezer to heat it up.

we had a little break where it got warm enough for icicles to drip, and that's when we scrambled to make sure the coolers were full enough that things would not soften.
Now it's back to powder and rock-hard outdoor food cache.


I am trying to go for several miles in the snow for exercise, but my lungs feel pretty weird when I come back in.  Not sure if I'm cleaning them out or scarring them up. 


It's so cold we caught the tenderfoot dog trying to stand on 2 legs to get 2 feet off the snow at once.  Haven't caught him on 1 leg yet.

-Erica
 
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