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Red worms seem a little lethargic

 
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My red worms don't wiggle very fast when I get in there and bother them ( something I don't like doing but necessary to inspect their well being.) In the past I've noticed them wiggle like crazy! now they kind of just roll over like if your trying to wake up a little kid that wants to keep sleeping. One of them even acted like it was dead and then finally moved a little. I think they have enough air, the bin doesn't even have a lid. I might drill some extra holes around the bottom though to see if that helps. They are all kind of purple now where in the past when I put them into this new bin they were mostly the steriotypical red color. The bin doesn;t smell funky, and the castings are all damp but not soaked. I'm guessing there is many different problems it could be so if any one has any ideas or ways to futher evaluate their well being please let me know. Could this happen if there is too many worms in too small of a space?
 
warren mccarthy
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I just dug up around where I've been feeding them and they are a lot more responsive. Why do so many worms hang out where theres not hardley any food left? I started drill more holes in the bin near the bottom and I drilled a small worm in two : (  I won't being doing that again.  I've also got a lot of those littel white worms hanging out around the new food as well. I've alwasy had these but usually they're population is more under control.
 
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What's the temperature of your bin? Red Worms tend to get lethargic in the winter when the temperature starts to drop. They definitely don't mind small spaces, in fact they enjoy clumping up together as tightly as possible.
 
warren mccarthy
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I don't have a soil thermometer but I keep the bin inside so they're not too cold. That might be it though because when I first put them in here we had the fire going a lot more often but now it warmed up a bit so we haven't been keeping it as toasty in here.Last winter I kept them in the garage at night and they hardley ate anything but exploded in spring and summer. I did some more inspecting and I saw an egg which is good. they're old bin was smaller and at one point they stopped laying eggs which I thought might have been because of space.

I see your from the Sierras. That's where I'm from as well. Definately looking forward to and hopeful for the rain we're supposed to get this week
 
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