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Help identifying this shrub

 
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Hello all! I'm a novice gardener with big permaculture /edible yard plans in  Edmonton AB (zone 3b, I think). This is our first winter in a house with a yard and I plan in creating a food  jungle for my kids to explore.

I'm taking stock of what's currently growing and making a long term and short term plan. We have a hedge that separates our apple tree "quadrant" from what will be our annual veggie patch and I'm wondering what it is. It is about 4-5 feet tall and has dark green leaves in the summer that turn a beautiful bright red in the fall. Are the berries edible? If so, are they tasty? Should I plan on replacing the hedge with something else, like raspberries? Thanks for the advice!
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Berry and winter leaf
 
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Location: Alberta, zone 3
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Tough to say but I would think cottoneaster. It’s all over here. Not edible but good for birds.
 
Adèle Maisonneuve
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Thanks Simone! I googled it and it looks like you're right. Since its attractive to birds, we'll probably be keeping it. I'll find another spot for berries
 
pollinator
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Location: Zones 2-4 Wyoming and 4-5 Colorado
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Might also be serviceberry? Hard to tell in winter. Do you have a picture of it in bloom, in summer, with berries?
 
Adèle Maisonneuve
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Serviceberry, like saskatoon? They're definitely not saskatoons. The berries aren't as round, they have kind of a flat bottom that seems to curl inwards like a fig (if that makes sense) and they don't have the same kind of frill or little petal like structures on the blossom end like saskatoons and blueberries do. Plus the leaves have smooth edges, not toothed ones. A saskatoon hedge  would be delightful; they're probably my all time favourite fruit. The wild ones that grow around here are tall and narrow, though, and wouldn't quite work the way this hedge does.
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