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Favorite Hosta varieties?

 
master gardener
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I have quite a few Hostas that I really enjoy eating that were acquired through sharing, so not sure the varieties.  Since I really like them I'd like to identify varietal names to share info on the best ones with the broader community.  This past year I planted out 18 cultivars to see how they do and to see which seem to make the best crops when grown under trees.  While waiting I though I'd ask you guys....which Hostas are your favorites as cooking greens?  (flavor, yield, etc.)

Thanks in advance!
 
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I would love to know this, too! I got a few transplants from my mother that I liked the appearance of, but I'd love to get some that are sure to taste good. I've yet to eat hostas (I didn't know they were edible until recently, and my plants are still small). It'd be wonderful to know what types are the tastiest!
 
Greg Martin
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Fingers crossed for a post from folks with lots of experience....seems like a terrific plant for the edible landscape.

In the meantime, here's a link to Stephen Barstow's article on edible hostas:
http://www.edimentals.com/blog/?page_id=2722
 
pollinator
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It's about time to bring this thread back to the top!

I have an old hosta variety, inherited from my grandparents, that I absolutely LOVE - I mean for food*. I hated them until I realized that they were edible. It seemed to me that their main purpose in life was to shade the lower siding of our summer cottage so the carpenter ants and termites could crawl right up and invade. Five years ago I found out that you could eat them (the hostas, I mean). After that they grew on me (haha!) Turns out they are not just edible. The spring shoots (like little rocket ships) are as tasty as asparagus - though with a delightfully bitter flavor, and the flower stems with unopened buds make a great, mid-summer vegetable if you have enough of them. Fortunately, we have more than we need.

To make sure your spring shoots are as large as possible, cover them with a pile of leaves or an upturned pot. This blanches them and encourages them to stay tightly rolled, which I find to be preferable to an opened leaf. Try to snap them off as low as possible. I like to take the entire shoot, with bottom intact, whenever possible. Although I do end up composting the bottom of the shoot after cutting it off, I feel that this probably leaves the plant less susceptible to infection.  

Here is what the spring sprouts look like once they have been uncovered:


And here's me picking the buds in late June.

If you can tell me the variety in the video above, please do. No guessing, though. I really want to get this right so I can share and recommend them by name.

So cover up those hostas! You may need them this spring!
And follow me on Instagram (@foodforestcardgame) for lots more garden videos!

*As always, go slowly when trying new foods. If you have never eaten hostas before, don't just take my word for it, do your own due diligence.
 
Karl Treen
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Thought maybe I'd add an update now that the shoots are ready to eat! I hope this is not too late for some of you. It's prime hosta shoot season in the North Eastern United States!




Please consider following my humble YouTube channel for more tips on unusual edibles and forest gardening!
 
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