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Different ways to compost  RSS feed

 
Posts: 22
Location: Tucson, United States
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What is the best way to compost? I can find lots of info on 1 type of composting but I am not seeing as much about mixing compost styles. For instance I like the ideas of worm bins, I also plan to run chickens and I was also looking at Black Soldier Fly larvae and possibly meal worms for chicken/quail feed. I was also thinking of raising at least some quail and rabbits. All of this will be starting as home use, nothing commercial. I don't think we produce enough food waste to feed all this. I will try finding local sources for more compost materials and worm food, etc. Is there certain things that work better in one system then another? I know meat is not good for straight compost but it works in worms, BSL and chickens? I read something about function stacking and I think it was rabbits poop > BSL > quail, is there anything else to combine the chain of composters? I wouldn't be against a regular compost pile either but I think I will be busy enough with all these systems. We have 3 acres and cows as well. Lots of grasses and hopefully growing a food forest eventually and a garden.

Nothing is built yet, we are actually moving in the next month or two so I am just planning. The cows are there now from the previous owner and being taken care of until we move in.
 
pollinator
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We scoop horse stalls and use a manure spreader to put it on the cow pasture.

We put food scraps in a bucket and bury in a pile of manure. I bury, then bury, then bury.  At some point  i start a new pile and let old one finish.

Sometimes i take a shovel and bury the bucket of scraps straight into the garden or flower bed.

One time i collected bags of leaves and mixed it with manure and left it alone for a year.

I guess theres many ways to make it. It can be as complicated or simple as you want.

 
gardener
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Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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hau Jay, lots of different methods you have listed work great, but be careful to not get so many going at the same time that you end up with more to take care of than you can manage right off the bat.

I have worm beds and compost heaps, those two take care of what items our hogs and chickens don't eat.

you mention; worm bins and BSFL for quail and chicken feed, the BSFL are great, then you will have bedding with poop that can lay out for the chickens to scratch through (deep litter style) or you can start a compost heap with that material and even add cow manure to the mix for a super nice compost that will be full of all the right life forms for garden soil improvement.  Meat can be composted in a hot compost heap with enough material to have the meat deep inside the heap or you can cook it and then the chickens can eat worm sized bits of it.

If you are near a town, you might be able to collect grass clippings in bags and or leaves in the fall which are great additions to compost heaps.

Worms can be raised in bins or in lined trenches but the trenches require a lot more material than bins.
BSF can be raised in worm bin like containers or even 5 gal buckets with lids.
Rabbit droppings are ready to use manure so those can simply be put on the garden as you collect them.

Biggest thing is to step back, pick two for start up, then as you get comfortable in your place you can always add one or two additional methods of waste recycling.

Redhawk
 
pollinator
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There are really many different styles and it is difficult! For chicken manure it is not easy if your chicken (or whatever fowl you have) are outside during the day then there is not much manure at all and it is mixed with the bedding. chicken manure is potent but you won't pick it up on the paddock. Steve Solomon has a great book you can download for free: compost and recently there was a thread of and instruction which goes alongside the steiner method with a preparation.
 
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I’ve found the best combination for me is to keep a small kitchen caddy to store food waste during the day, move it to a bokashi bin when full, then transfer to a compost tumbler when the bokashi bin fills up. It’s super convenient and the bokashi fermentation avoids any bad smells. I’ve made a YouTube video showing this whole process, step-by-step: https://youtu.be/uAQWMut410E.

Hope it helps.

Daniel
 
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