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What flower is this? - Malva genus but yet to narrow it down  RSS feed

 
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This Perennial keeps coming back along my fence line and is so pretty!  I cut back the blooms and saved the seeds to see if I can place it elsewhere in my yard.  Is it a wildflower or something else?  Best Regards!~
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gardener
Posts: 3475
Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
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It's from the Malvaceae/mallow family. Something from the malva genus?

I would be tasting those seeds when they are young. And the young leaves. I bet both are very edible.
 
gardener
Posts: 1462
Location: Ladakh, Indian Himalayas at 10,500 feet, zone 5
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Yep, it looks a lot like Himalayan hollyhock, which is native here. This one is indeed in the mallow family and has edible leaves when small. I'm not sure ours is perennial; I think it's a freely self-seeding annual, but I'm not really sure. It is Lavatera kashmiriana. I doubt yours is the same species, but looks similar.
Himalayan-Hollyhock.jpg
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pollinator
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Location: Longbranch, WA
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The hollyhock can be perennial in mild climates. Many of mine survive for a second season. It also seeds very prolifically in any disturbed ground.  The small green donut of immature seeds is considered edible but I don't consider it worth the trouble. The blossoms hoever are delightful in sallades for color and antioxidants. The seed is so endemic in my soil that it comes up in flats that I am starting other things and I wind up with plants to sell through our co-op.  It can develop a long tap root and used to be planted around out houses and would thrive because it could reach the the contents of the pit below.
 
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It looks like Rose of Sharon to me
 
pollinator
Posts: 540
Location: SW Missouri, Zone 7a
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I agree with the others that it is in the Malva genus, but I think it may be Malva sylvestris or high mallow. You can see a photo and read the description here ... Missouri Botanical Garden, Plant Finder
 
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Location: Nomadic
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Nice. Where is the plant? Geographical region? When was the picture taken?
 
Shelly Humula
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Thank you everyone for your kind responses!  Very helpful posts.  I have to agree with the tree mallow thought.  I live in the Skagit Valley area of Washington State.  The picture was taken mid-summer.   Generally a mild winter here; though wet and it has self seeded for two seasons now.  I think it is such a pretty plant and will definitely be propagating this plant elsewhere on my property.  The bees seem to love it too. 
 
pollinator
Posts: 1223
Location: northern northern california
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yes this is Malva Sylvestris - something like 'zebrina'

https://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/51464/

like ALL of the mallow, the entire plant is edible. the young leaves and tender parts are tastier, but even the roots, such as in it's cousin Marsh Mallow, are used as a food source. the Malva genus, and related Hibiscus, and Hollyhock families, are all ENTIRELY edible plants, including the flowers.



 
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Here in Wisconsin,, Mine come up every year.. From seeds dropped in the fall ..   Agree they are a great flower and free.. Mine DO however seem to get that wilder appearance,, as in smaller plants and less flowering every year..

                         Thanks           sodi
 
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