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Lysine requirement in a pig diet  RSS feed

 
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I've been reading that Lysine is an essential amino acid in a pig diet. I live in Texas and the state is being overrun by wild hogs. I'm wondering how do the wild hogs survive and multiply without an available source of lysine?
 
Mother Tree
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gardener
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There is an available source of lysine found in a lot of vegetative matter or weeds as some might call them. Common pigweed contains lysine. So do a lot of legumes. Wild hogs have so much biodiverse food choices, I think they're getting sufficient quantities of vitamins, minerals, amino acids and other nutrition, as evidenced by their booming population.
 
Ron Metz
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In the Texas panhandle, pigweed is also called careless weed and it is the bane of all cotton farmers. They spend millions of dollars a year to kill this stuff. Who would have thought this "weed" which is so prolific in my area would be a great source of lysine for pigs!! Where I live, it has become round up resistant and they are looking for new ways to kill it. I could cut and bale it for hay to feed my pigs. Thank for the info.
 
Ron Metz
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I found this bit of info on the Internet. It directly conflicts with those who say they plant amaranth for their pigs. Any truth to this?

"Like many other species of Amaranthus, this plant may be harmful and even deadly when fed to cattle and pigs in large amounts over several days. Such forage may cause fatal nephrotoxicity,[7] presumably because of its high oxalate content. Other symptoms, such as bloat, might reflect its high nitrate content.[8] However, when supplied in moderation, it is regarded as an exceptionally nutritious fodder".
 
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In a commercial ration each of the required things there in balance to minimize waste and cost.

In a wild or pastured setting the animal simply eats more of things that may contain less than the ideal percent of lysine, etc. By eating more and excreting what they don't need they get what they do need. It is "less efficient" but that is only because of looking at the problem too closely. In the pasture or wild situation the pig is part of a larger food web. What it excretes becomes food for other things in the system. Confinement producers don't want that because that "waste" has to be dealt with.
 
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