• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies living kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • raven ranson
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Julia Winter
garden masters:
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • thomas rubino
  • Bill Crim
  • Kim Goodwin
  • Joylynn Hardesty
gardeners:
  • Amit Enventres
  • Mike Jay
  • Dan Boone

How much chicken manure to top dress beds?  RSS feed

 
Posts: 113
Location: Middle Georgia
21
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hoping someone can provide a simple answer (that does not involve weight).  I need to know how much chicken manure to put on top of my beds, such as 1/4 inch, 1/2 inch etc... This will be covered with mulch/straw, then transplants will be planted in about 6 weeks.

The manure is from my own birds, it has been aged (not composted) in cages from 6-12 months. It was probably 50% manure and 50% shavings/plant matter. I sifted it out. All smells like clean soil, no hint of ammonia or poop smell. I am not concerned about pathogens or seeds, just want to be sure I don't burn my transplants with too much nitrogen.

Any tips on how much I should spread? I also have 40 lbs of soy meal (feed) that I want to use as fertilizer, but think I may wait to add it later this summer? Soy meal and chicken poo would probably be too much. We are talking about maybe 400 sq of planting space.

Thanks!
 
Lucrecia Anderson
Posts: 113
Location: Middle Georgia
21
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Can't delete the original thread or I would.

anyway I finally found the answer. 1/2" to 1" of aged manure OR roughly 150-200 grams of manure per "pepper plant", ideally added 50 grams every 2-3 weeks.

For soybean meal it is roughly 2-5 lbs per 100 sq ft.
 
gardener
Posts: 2136
Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
369
books food preservation hunting solar trees woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Lucrecia, I'm glad you can't delete the original thread.  I didn't know the answer but I've been watching for the answer.  Thanks for posting it!
 
pollinator
Posts: 772
Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
12
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
An inch sounds like a lot to me. Maybe you could do a test planting?

It also depends on what you are planting. Corn needs a lot more than tomatoes.
 
gardener
Posts: 4867
Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
557
books chicken dog duck fish forest garden fungi homestead hugelkultur hunting pig
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I would go with a maximum of 1/2 inch of aged manure, I would not sift out the bedding (shavings) they offer some buffering effect.

The best method for using chicken manure (which is considered a "HOT" manure just as sheep manure is) is to compost it with the bedding material and other add ins you might have.

My heaps consist of donkey bedding, manure and urine, hog manure and bedding, chicken manure and bedding, ground wood chips (I run them through the chipper twice) and grass / garden clippings.
It takes a fresh heap 3 months to finish,  at the one month time I add a mushroom slurry over the top of the heap, If I have any of my preparations ready (see preparations those go in right after the heap build or as soon as they are ready.

Aged manure is better but do remember it still has any pathogens that were present in it and they are going to be active, not the best for vegetable feeding if there is anyway around using this, but if not, add some fungi spores to mitigate the "bad bugs".

Redhawk
 
Something must be done about this. Let's start by reading this tiny ad:
It's like binging on 7 seasons of your favorite netflix permaculture show
http://permaculture-design-course.com/
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!