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alternate method for training grapes  RSS feed

 
Rob Sigg
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Location: PA-Zone 6
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OK I tried to get some discussion going in another thread about alternate training methods for grapes, but I wanted to start a new thread on the subject.

I don't have much space to work with and I dont have any walls/surfaces to train it on. I don't have the money or desire to build any free standing supports so I got to thinking about how I could overcome this. My idea.....


Train a main cordon straight up like a tree trunk with rebar supports on either side. The height would probably be 6 feet or so tall. I would then have secondary cordons coming off the main cordon like a regular trellis trained vine, only these would be only 14 inches or so long. I would have as many secondary cordons as possible and have them alternate around in a spiral fashion up the main cordon, sorta like spiral stairs and natural forms of trees. I would obviously keep the lowest cordon up high off the ground. From there the varities I want to grow will be spur pruned off of the secondary cordons. I will try and whip of a picture at some point to illustrate this.

So im looking for feedback on any issues people might see or altnerate methods that I haven't heard about. Thanks!
 
Terri Matthews
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Location: Eastern Kansas
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Not a bad idea. I imagine that, in time, the trunk might get so big that the metal supports would not be needed.

I never use the old clothesline, so last year I planted a grapevine by one post and I tied it to it. It is too early to tell if this is a good idea or not.
 
Rob Sigg
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"Not a bad idea. I imagine that, in time, the trunk might get so big that the metal supports would not be needed."

That was my assumption as well.

 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
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lower cordons would work well in most areas..myself I prefer to have my grapes at an easy height to pick so I grow them up over arbors..however..I don't grow them for wine or things like that..just for fresh eating ..do have some ancient vines for juice and jelly though
 
Rob Sigg
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Here is a pic. Keep in mind the secondary cordons are only 14inches or so long. with spurs every 6-8 inches.
vine.JPG
[Thumbnail for vine.JPG]
 
John Polk
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Worth giving it a try.  It could be a problem if you have a very heavy yield.
 
Rob Sigg
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Do you mean in terms of overall weight? Im trying to keep the cordons short enough to get good fruit but strong enough to withstand weight. I figure worse case is I just thin the fruit back if needed. The central cordon will be supported by free standing rebar...no concrete anchors just in the soil.
 
Gary Stuart
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Location: Wakefield, Quebec, zone 3b/4a CAN
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I was thinking of training mine on the deck.



On the two main corner posts.  It's mostly in the sun all day and definitely close to home.

How about that ?

Have never grown grape vines before and I'm a bit nervous about it.
 
Rob Sigg
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I would think that would work.
 
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