• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
  • Nicole Alderman
stewards:
  • Joseph Lofthouse
  • paul wheaton
  • Mike Haasl
master gardeners:
  • jordan barton
  • John F Dean
  • Carla Burke
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Jay Angler
  • Leigh Tate
  • thomas rubino

New pond owner; question about soggy soil around pond

 
Posts: 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hello All, I am new to owning a pond and finding all kinds of helpful information here.  The pond is doing well and the fish and turtles are thriving.  It's a man made pond, and from google earth pics, it appears it's been around since the house was built in 1986.  It's about .6 of an acre and from what we can tell about 3-5 feet deep.  We are in low land in Central Florida with a lot of wetlands around.  I'm trying to find the best way to keep the water from seeping out into the land around the pond.  The soil appears to be sand in most places and a mucky type in other places.    The soil around the pond and the soil on the island are very soggy even if we haven't had rain in weeks.  

I've researched bentonite clay and watersave (the polymer that you sprinkle over the water and sinks to the bottom to seal).  Not sure if there's a US company that sells this type of polymer as the watersave company I found is in Australia.  I was thinking of getting the bentonite and sprinkling it around the edges before the rainy season and the pond fills up more.  Also, seriously considering the polymer product.

Has anyone used either product on an existing pond to keep the water in the pond and not seeping out the soil around the pond?

Thanks in advance for any/all advice!!
IMG_3896.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG_3896.jpg]
pond
 
pollinator
Posts: 4328
Location: Anjou ,France
243
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Not sure if you are not setting yourself up for mission impossible here :-)
Have you obseved this pond over time and does it go up and down with the seasons ?
Why do you want to get rid of the natural boggy edge ?

David
 
Posts: 25
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Or maybe use plants that like soggy to break it up 😊 and or a series of swales and plants!
 
gardener
Posts: 899
Location: North Georgia / Appalachian mountains , Zone 7B/8A
49
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator


Real ponds have soggy edges. This is where the froggies live, this is a natural part of a pond.  If you want to make it prettier and keep people from walking
on the edges and getting goo in their shoes, plant water loving plants in those areas.  This will make your pond healthier too.  

There are all kinds of attractive green and flowering plants that would love to live in these soggy areas.
https://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/1332
 
hilari smith
Posts: 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks David, Tripp and Cris.  We have only lived here a few months and the water has gone down about a foot (it's been a fairly dry winter).  The previous owner did tell me that when we had a several month drought last year, the pond nearly dried up.  Also, there is a drain on the side that if the water level gets too high, the water will drain out that pipe and into the wetlands behind the house.  I do want to avoid the sogginess so we don't walk in it, but the main reason is I want to redo the driveway which is close to the pond.  You can see in the pics, the concrete is very cracked.  My thought was if the pond wasn't leaching, I could bring in some soil with some clay in it and redo the driveway (after I have the old concrete taken out and recycled).  I thought there would be no point in redoing the driveway if the soil was the same (saturated from the pond) and the new concrete would do the same and crack excessively when it settled. Is this me thinking in the wrong direction here?  It seems like I've walked around ponds in Florida that aren't soggy like this, but that may be those are more retention ponds and not real ponds.  This pond is flourishing with life and a very happy pond, so we do want to keep it that way.
 
pollinator
Posts: 4958
1154
transportation duck trees rabbit tiny house chicken earthworks building woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
If the pond ever goes dry again you can put in a natural liner for it. It is called Bentonite and swells in water to several times its size. It really works, but is an expense.

Here we are lazy and use something more permicultural to seal a pond: DUCKS! Not sure how they would do in Florida (Alligators?) but here they create a slurry from how they eat and poo, and over time really create a natural liner for the pond.
 
master steward
Posts: 14638
Location: Pacific Northwest
6621
hugelkultur kids cat duck forest garden foraging fiber arts sheep wood heat homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have ducks and a pond, and they've been doing their business in it for over 2 years, and have yet to seal it that I can tell. But, I also have gravely loam soil, which probably makes it harder for them to seal the pond...
 
pollinator
Posts: 1438
Location: Bendigo , Australia
90
dog gear plumbing earthworks bee building homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
With respect,it sounds as if you have a different concept about ponds, which does not line up with reality.
The pond knows what its doing, just leave it alone and as suggested , just walk elsewhere.
I would love a pond like that in Australia where our droughts last 10 years at times, not months.
Anyway enjoy it for what it is, maybe get a boat and sit in that in the middle!
 
pollinator
Posts: 721
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada
90
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
By the look of that photo, the land around the pond is only a few inches above the water line. Be aware that the water permeates the soil at roughly the same level as the surface of the pond, and will wick up to the surface of the soil somewhat.

If you want dry ground surrounding that pond, you will need to raise the surrounding land up by adding soil from elsewhere.
gift
 
Collection of 14 Permaculture/Homesteading Cheat-Sheets, Worksheets, and Guides
will be released to subscribers in: soon!
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic