• Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Electric net fence/ charger suggesstions?

 
Tim Canton
Posts: 175
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hey all,


I am going to be using either kencove or premier electric mesh netting for my chickens.  I was wondering what you all do for chargers?  There is battery, electric and solar  and I guess they are all really a combo.  The electric or solar charges the battery etc.....

The whole idea of a battery  lead/acid is a bit off putting....of course i suppose so is electricity.....

Anyway was wondering what you folks do.......also if you do solar did you buy a kit ($300)  or is there a better way to go about it?



 
Brice Moss
Posts: 700
Location: rainier OR
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
led acid batteries shouldn't be a put off they are one of the most recyclable things in the world, just make sure you take the dead ones to the store when you buy new ones

http://www.leadacidbatteryinfo.org/lead-acid-battery-recycling.htm
this is from the industries own mouth but I couldn't find anything to the contrary when I researched a year or two ago because I was considering an electric car build

you can buy one piece solar chargers for about $250 from any feed store they just need to be set where they get good daytime light, I believe the only difference with the netting is that it has two leads that you attach to the hot and ground terminals on the charger (someone correct me if I'm wrong here)
 
Tim Canton
Posts: 175
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks Brice,


From what i have read the charge is the issue with chickens  I have read it needs more jolt than fence for horses etc.   
 
Brice Moss
Posts: 700
Location: rainier OR
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
because there are so many wires it takes a more jolt per length of fence, but I doubt you are looking to fence off acres of land as your chicken paddock
 
Joe Skeletor
Posts: 113
Location: Blue Island, Illinois - Zone 6a - (Lake Effect) - surrounded by zone 5b
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We've definitely noticed in our electric fence paddock / solar charger set-up that the charge will get pretty weak with too many cloudy days in a row. Maybe get two batteries so that you can switch out the battery if the solar panel is not charging it enough? Even when the charge is weak, it is rare that the chickens get out. If predators getting IN is a big problem for you, a weak charge might be more of an issue -


Joe
 
Brice Moss
Posts: 700
Location: rainier OR
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
the battery I pulled from my lil diesel jetta last year because it wasn't cranking as fast as I wanted (about the size battery you'd find in a pickup 5 years old) keeps the fence running to keep the goats to one side of the pasture for about two weeks with a .5 joule low impedance charger, and the fence hits hard enough that I keep my distance even though I know it wont actually harm me.

ie if you already have a large solar system the carrying around batteries shouldn't be to hard
 
Tim Canton
Posts: 175
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Brice,    def.  not acres.  just using one 164ft fence  so 1600 sq ft

Joe,  I dont have anything yet but am trying to decide if the solar is worth it at nearly twice the price if it wont work well all year.  Premier recommends at least .25 joles for a section of fence  but they have a limited selection of chargers.
 
Joe Skeletor
Posts: 113
Location: Blue Island, Illinois - Zone 6a - (Lake Effect) - surrounded by zone 5b
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Well, for what it's worth, we've got 3 solar chargers on 3 different flocks, have had them for about 2 years, and are going to switch to something different because eventually the batteries lose their charge. We were dissatisfied with solar. - Joe
 
John Polk
master steward
Pie
Posts: 8018
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
269
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Keeping the battery off of the ground will help prolong the charge.  Dew, or even high humidity, will allow some of the charge to seep into the ground.  Placing the battery on a piece of scrap wood will go a long way in preventing battery drain.
 
Tim Canton
Posts: 175
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
thanks you guys......

on a second note....do you  like this type of fence for paddocks/ chickens?  As far as effectivness, ease, portability etc?

Blessings
 
John Polk
master steward
Pie
Posts: 8018
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
269
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The portability makes it a good way to contain the birds, and exclude predators (non flyers).
 
tel jetson
steward
Posts: 3356
Location: woodland, washington
75
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
organick wrote:
thanks you guys......

on a second note....do you  like this type of fence for paddocks/ chickens?   As far as effectivness, ease, portability etc?

Blessings


I don't like the 164-ft fences.  too much for one person to easily handle alone.  the 100-ft sections work better for me.  and I prefer the stouter posts.  Premier 1 calls them "Perma-net", I believe.  not sure about other outfit's product names.  the skinnier posts just don't hold up straight and keep the fence taut without a lot of guy lines and staking.
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://richsoil.com/email
  • Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic