• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • jordan barton
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Steve Thorn
  • Leigh Tate
  • r ranson
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Greg Martin
  • Mike Haasl
master gardeners:
  • John F Dean
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Jay Angler
  • Nancy Reading

Growing Mulberries Naturally

 
Posts: 9
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thank you Steve! I bought mine from a pretty large “Online nursery” so I am sure it’s the first variety you mentioned. Thank you!!
 
master steward
Posts: 2688
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
964
forest garden fish trees foraging earthworks food preservation cooking bee woodworking homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This was my largest mulberry last August. It has amazed me how fast this tree has grown and how healthy it is. Looking forward to a good sized mulberry harvest this year!
20200809_165645.jpg
Large mulberry tree in August
Large mulberry tree in August
 
Steve Thorn
master steward
Posts: 2688
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
964
forest garden fish trees foraging earthworks food preservation cooking bee woodworking homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This is my other bigger mulberry the same day. It fell over when the fence around it fell over in a storm, but it is still doing well. This one has huge leaves.
20200809_165833.jpg
Big leafed mulberry fell over
Big leafed mulberry fell over
 
Posts: 57
Location: PA, USA Zone 7a
35
kids forest garden books chicken cooking bee
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

r ranson wrote:Last year I experimented on 3, 3-year old trees.  One I coppiced (cut at ground level), one I pollard (kept one stem and only one stem at shoulder hight, and one I left and trimmed the dead branches when the buds started to swell.  

The coppiced one SHOULD do better from everything I've read, but it was the last to leaf out in the spring and is still smaller than the other two.

The pollard one was second last one to leaf out.  About a week after the not pruned one.  It's doing okay, but the top of the pollard died off, and it branched out all up and down the stem as well as from teh root.  So it didn't do the thing I had hoped it would.

The one I left leafed out earliest and has more than twice as many leaves as the other two combined.


But that is what happened one year in my climate on an unusual winter.  So I need to do some more experiments to get a better idea of what works in my climate.



This is something I want to do. I got 3 red mulberries this past winter and have kept them in my greenhouse. I want to plant one on the northwest side of a small orchard, but I don't want it to get 40'+ tall, so I was thinking of coppicing it. I plan on putting it in the ground in a week or two, letting it grow on for the season, and pruning to the ground late winter next year.

I'm going to put one near our woods and just let it grow, but I also want to put one next to a fence and willow tree near our chicken coop...and I'll probably have to manage how tall it gets. Anyone else have experience pruning mulberries?
 
pollinator
Posts: 408
Location: Missouri. USA. Zone 6b
279
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I am clearing a spot with invasive vines and found this tree: 9ft tall covered with tiny berries and barely any leaves. Is it a female red mulberry? I ran plantnet and it said tamarisk, I don't think so.
Resized_20210407_165351.jpeg
wild red mulberry
 
Steve Thorn
master steward
Posts: 2688
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
964
forest garden fish trees foraging earthworks food preservation cooking bee woodworking homestead ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It does look like an unopened mulberry flower!

Here's another photo of one to compare.



If you can get a picture of the branch and a few buds it'll be easier to tell for sure, but I think it is!
 
May Lotito
pollinator
Posts: 408
Location: Missouri. USA. Zone 6b
279
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks Steve, that does look similar.

I will wait for them to grow some more to be sure.  I just realized it might be a mulberry yesterday and was really eager to find out. The tree is located in the corner, about to get invaded by honeysuckles.  
https://permies.com/t/151226/Trash-treasure-making-biochar-invasives
Here's a silhouette shot, lots of berries expected.
Resized_20210407_164229.jpeg
Mulberry silhouette
 
Steve Thorn
master steward
Posts: 2688
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
964
forest garden fish trees foraging earthworks food preservation cooking bee woodworking homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The leaves are emerging on my largest mulberry tree, it is the last one to leaf out, and is very resistant to late frost damage as a result. Some of the other varieties got damaged in a late and very hard frost/freeze recently, but this one was totally unscathed.
20210410_114941.jpg
My largest and last mulberry tree to leaf out
My largest and last mulberry tree to leaf out
 
May Lotito
pollinator
Posts: 408
Location: Missouri. USA. Zone 6b
279
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I went in town to check out a red mulberry tree I know that bear fruits. And there is a Male tree right next to it. I took pictures and compared to my trees. Turned out the tree I was asking is a male, but I do have a female tree up on the hill. Catkins are still small under leaves so that I failed to see them from a distance.
P1130195.JPG
Female red mulberry
Female red mulberry
P1130198-(2).JPG
Male red mulberry
Male red mulberry
 
Posts: 145
11
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The mulberries here are some of the last trees to wake up from hibernation, so they're only just budding where I live.
 
pioneer
Posts: 84
Location: Douglas County, WI zone 4a 105 acres
13
fungi pig solar
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
My neighbor here in Zone 3b-4, offered me cuttings from 20ft trees that were fruiting last year and every year. Really wanted them but had no plan. Now that I know where I'll be putting my chicken coop/runs, I'm wondering if I can just "stick" them in opportune spots.
I can start them in pots of sand and then transplant if that's best. TYVM
 
Steve Thorn
master steward
Posts: 2688
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
964
forest garden fish trees foraging earthworks food preservation cooking bee woodworking homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Mary Beth Alexander wrote: Now that I know where I'll be putting my chicken coop/runs, I'm wondering if I can just "stick" them in opportune spots.
I can start them in pots of sand and then transplant if that's best. TYVM



Some varieties of mulberry will root easily from cuttings and some may be really picky. I've heard that the wild North American varieties tend to fall in the trickier category. I like to have a separate nursery bed for trickier stuff to root, where it can be nurtured and get strong to be transplanted in its final home the next year.

This was an interesting thread about rooting mulberries.

Making mulberries on the cheap

Hope your cuttings do well!
 
Posts: 14
Location: Southern WV
4
foraging chicken fiber arts
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have a very old ( red) mulberry tree, that was gifted to me. It has produced so many berries over the years. Some for the wildbirds, some for my chickens & lots for me 😄 ! A few years ago it was damaged by freak ice storm. But still produces berries. I want to get some starts or cuttings from the tree. But have no idea when I should do this?

 
Steve Thorn
master steward
Posts: 2688
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
964
forest garden fish trees foraging earthworks food preservation cooking bee woodworking homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hardwood cuttings are my favorite personally, but some mulberries may be hard to root that way from what I've heard. These are done during the dormant season.

Semi hardwood cuttings can be taken once some of the current season's growth has gotten firmer.

Right now could be a good time for air layering. It is more labor intensive, but I've heard it can have good results.

Would love to hear how your cuttings turn out if you give it a try!
 
Wendy Boardman
Posts: 14
Location: Southern WV
4
foraging chicken fiber arts
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Steve Thorn thank you for the tips on when to do too cuttings from my mulberry tree. I had not thought of air layering. Have read very little on the subject, but am willing to learn. If I do get any to root & plant, is it possible to keep them small like a shrub?
 
Steve Thorn
master steward
Posts: 2688
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
964
forest garden fish trees foraging earthworks food preservation cooking bee woodworking homestead ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Glad it was helpful!

You can prune them to be a smaller size, but my personal theory on growing fruit trees is that the plants will be the healthiest and produce the most when they grow as closely to their natural shape as possible. Some mulberries will grow huge amounts in height each year, and to prune off all of the new growth can negatively affect their health.

There are some mulberry varieties though that are natural dwarfs. These can be a great option if you are looking for a smaller sized tree, as they naturally max out at a smaller size.

Hope your mulberries do well!
 
Steve Thorn
master steward
Posts: 2688
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
964
forest garden fish trees foraging earthworks food preservation cooking bee woodworking homestead ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Young mulberries forming!
20210411_175536.jpg
Mulberries forming!
Mulberries forming!
20210411_175522.jpg
Mulberries forming
20210411_175546.jpg
Mulberries forming
 
Steve Thorn
master steward
Posts: 2688
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
964
forest garden fish trees foraging earthworks food preservation cooking bee woodworking homestead ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It looks like there are going to be a ton of tasty mulberries this year!
20210416_072432.jpg
Lots of big mulberries forming!
Lots of big mulberries forming!
20210416_072437.jpg
lots of mulberries forming!
20210416_072507.jpg
lots of mulberries forming!
 
May Lotito
pollinator
Posts: 408
Location: Missouri. USA. Zone 6b
279
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Both my dwarf everlasting and Pakistan mulberry trees died back to the ground and regrew this year. They already leafed out after a warm March then got hit by snowy weather in late April. I am not expecting fruits this year again, maybe they just don't fit in my area.

On the other hand, my wild mulberry tree is loaded with fruits, although they are kind of small. I plan on propagating more from that tree, so what's the best way to do it? Can I just cut and stick a  1"-2" thick branch in ground or I need to air layer for branch so big? Thanks.
P1140087.JPG
Wild mulberry tree
Wild mulberry tree
P1140090.JPG
Fruits only 1" long
Fruits only 1" long
 
Steve Thorn
master steward
Posts: 2688
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
964
forest garden fish trees foraging earthworks food preservation cooking bee woodworking homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
My Pakistan has had troubles also. It didn't die back to the ground this year, but it got hit extremely hard by a bad late frost, and it has some new growth coming back, but I may just cut it down. My other mulberry is much hardier and didn't have any damage and leafed out even later than the wild ones, which got hurt by the frost but not as bad as Pakistan.

I'm going to try propagating it with hardwood cuttings later in the late Fall and see how that works, and I might give air layering a try as well. I have had minimal success grafting  mulberry so far. Would love to hear how yours turns out and what you try!
 
Steve Thorn
master steward
Posts: 2688
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
964
forest garden fish trees foraging earthworks food preservation cooking bee woodworking homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Mulberries are quickly becoming one of my favorite fruits. Not only do these mulberries have a sweet and extremely pleasant flavor, but they are also easy to grow and are producing a great crop after just a little over two years after being planted.

They also have a huge harvest window. They started producing in late May and are still pumping out mulberries almost two months later and don't seem like they will stop anytime soon!
20210524_200000.jpg
I love mulberries
I love mulberries
20210524_195730.jpg
Mulberry cluster ripening
Mulberry cluster ripening
20210605_155317.jpg
They turn form white, to red, to black when fully ripe
They turn form white, to red, to black when fully ripe
 
Posts: 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks. for your information and kind offer.  What zone are you in?...I'm afraid those seeds probably wouldn't grow here in Nebraska even though we're near a river...sad cuz I love me some blackberries...I can almost taste the ones you've describing
 
Posts: 23
1
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Ok, a giant stack of questions.
-What have people done to keep mulberries at a good picking height? I saw someone above with the advice to pollard at about 6 ft. Has anyone coppiced mulberry? Other ideas?
-We have a bunch of wild sown mulberries growing in our yard, some with plentiful tasty fruit and some with no fruit at all. Anyone know what's up with that? Will cuttings from fruitful plants also be fruitful? I've heard of mulberries CHANGING SEX if they're cut back hard. What??? Wacky.
-Anyone have recommendations for a good named variety for zone 4, and where to buy it? There is so much confusing info out there it's hard to know where to start...
-How are folks doing cuttings? I'm trying to decide whether to take cuttings from my wild fruitful berries or buy a named variety and clone from there...
 
gardener & author
Posts: 2327
Location: Tasmania
1242
2
homeschooling goat forest garden fungi foraging trees cooking food preservation pig wood heat homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Has anyone had any luck growing white mulberry from seed?

Do I need to freeze it, scarify it, or treat it in any other way before planting?
 
gardener
Posts: 2266
Location: South of Capricorn
951
dog rabbit urban cooking writing homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Bethany Ringdal wrote:
-What have people done to keep mulberries at a good picking height?
-We have a bunch of wild sown mulberries growing in our yard, some with plentiful tasty fruit and some with no fruit at all. Anyone know what's up with that?
-How are folks doing cuttings? I'm trying to decide whether to take cuttings from my wild fruitful berries or buy a named variety and clone from there...


I have three young mulberries I planted in my yard (and just discovered this thread) and decided to do some experimenting after NO fruit last year. At the beginning of spring I pruned one mildly, one brutally (6 feet, all branches, straight across), and left one. The one that was not pruned was covered with flowers but gave ZERO fruit. The two pruned trees gave me about a kg of berries combined (good for young trees, I think, and I missed a lot of picking because of birds and crummy weather), and if my old mulberry tree is any references I should get another harvest in the fall. They are native-type, so small fruit but sweet.
This year I'll cut the tall tree that I didn't prune yet, and see if it changes its tune.

I also have several white mulberries that have come up in the yard from bird droppings, I topped them in spring as well and they each squeezed out a few fruit. They are maybe 1 year old, max, so it's still early.

If you figure out cuttings, let me know. I took a few and put them in a pot and they didn't put out any roots, not sure what happened there, everyone says they're so easy but.... *shrugs*
 
Steve Thorn
master steward
Posts: 2688
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
964
forest garden fish trees foraging earthworks food preservation cooking bee woodworking homestead ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Kate Downham wrote:Has anyone had any luck growing white mulberry from seed?

Do I need to freeze it, scarify it, or treat it in any other way before planting?



I haven't grown them from seed yet, but I bet they would sprout if you plant them outside now or leave them in the fridge for a while.

I haven't tried white mulberries yet, but have heard they are very sweet but not as flavorful as the black ones. Has that been your experience?
 
Kate Downham
gardener & author
Posts: 2327
Location: Tasmania
1242
2
homeschooling goat forest garden fungi foraging trees cooking food preservation pig wood heat homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I've only tried white mulberries dried, they are really tasty dried, either on their own, or coated in chocolate. They were very sweet, crunchy, and a bit bland, but pleasant.

Very different from fresh black mulberries, but I haven't tried those dried. Hopefully when the black mulberry tree from the nursery I planted this year grows I can try to dry those too... If we don't eat them all raw or in mulberry crumble!
 
Tereza Okava
gardener
Posts: 2266
Location: South of Capricorn
951
dog rabbit urban cooking writing homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This talk of different varieties sent me down a Google rabbithole last night, during which I determined that my no-fruit tree is apparently male, which I had not considered (long, beautiful flowers that never turn into fruit).

I was mostly leaving that tree for the birds (it is replacing a large mulberry that is dying), I guess now it's for the birds and for the girl flowers!
 
You'll never get away with this you overconfident blob! The most you will ever get is this tiny ad:
Switching from electric heat to a rocket mass heater reduces your carbon footprint as much as parking 7 cars
http://woodheat.net
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic