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Vermiculture: Worm composting  RSS feed

 
Posts: 32
Location: Alberta Canada 3b I think....
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ok so how many worms it in that much wieght? I have found a lady in Edmonton that sells a litre container with worms, food and soil in it. She estimates that there are 30 plus worms in a container. She sells that for 10 dollars. She is saying that on average, people are buying 2 of these containers. Can anyone here estimate how many worms are in a half pound? Or give me an opinion on whether spending 20 bucks and getting 60 some worms is a worthwhile investment? I dont know what is a good price. Around here, vermicompost isnt a very popular thing. I will be the first in my town area that I know about that will be running a worm bin that I am aware of.

Thanks for the continued help
 
Posts: 308
Location: long island, ny Z-7a
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1 pound is estimated to be 1,000+/- worms, it's estimated they can double their population ever 3 months with optimal conditions.
i'd gotten mine at $9/lb through ebay. there are people on there selling at even $50 a pound,(and now $90/lb with your seller! that is ludicrous)
another good site is http://www.redwormcomposting.com/ . bentley lives in canada somewhere. also sells worms, quite expensive in my opinion but he really knows worms!

checked ebay and most prices are higher now. http://www.ebay.com/sch/Yard-Garden-Outdoor-Living-/159912/i.html?_sop=15&_from=R40&_nkw=red+wiggler
 
James Barr
Posts: 32
Location: Alberta Canada 3b I think....
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So I got a 'starter kit' from a local worm farmer the other day. The worms came packed in her compost. She said that she did that to help prevent shock. Is it normal for the worms to stay in one place for a long time before moving? Also, I am worried because when I check them out in their compost, they dont move very fast at all. Is there a reason for that or is it normal for a new bin?
 
Posts: 53
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This is an old question, but I'm answering just in case someone in the future runs into the same thing. Sometimes worms get dried out or puny in shipping. It should take less than 48 hours for them to perk back up once they are watered.
 
master pollinator
Posts: 666
Location: mountains of Tennessee
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bee chicken homestead
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This is now an old thread too. Got cabin fever yesterday & started an indoor worm garbage disposer. Haven't kept indoor worms in a number years so though it wise to read up. Some good info in this old thread so ... bumping it into 2019. (almost)

I went with simple construction using 2 empty storage containers. About 10 gallon size. They stack inside each other. Added drainage & vent holes to the top one. It also has a top cover. Filled it about half full of leaves. Then some shredded paper & cardboard. Wet that down good until it was moist. Followed by a layer of garden soil with the worms placed in the center. After the worms dug down to get away from the light I added coffee grounds & food scraps. Easy.

My initial purpose for these new critters is kitchen waste processing. Ultimately to breed more worms to populate outdoor worm pits & for chicken treats. They are excellent for use with cow pies & chicken straw for building quality soil fast.









 
Posts: 45
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Hiya guys

I would like to use my garden waste to produce worms to feed to chickens.

I was thinking off using a large blue barrel, and start emptying it during the winter months when the worms stop breeding.

My question is in regards to rotating the barrel, is it a good idea to rotate the worms or best just to let them go where they want?
 
Mike Barkley
master pollinator
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Location: mountains of Tennessee
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Rotating earthworms in containers? I hope we're not discussing rotating as in a tumbling composter. Presumably we're talking about swapping the container. When the container is full there are several good options. One method is to dump the contents on a tarp or something similar. Any exposed worms will dig down. Gradually remove the top layer of castings. Then wait for the worms to dig deeper. Then remove some more material. Repeat several times until most of the castings are removed. Add fresh bedding & food to the container & put the worms back in. Another method is to stop feeding them & let them almost completely finish processing the contents of the old container. Place a new container with fresh food & bedding on top of the old container. The worms will find the new food & move in through the drainage holes. That will take a few days or even a week.

Haven't fed worms to chickens yet. Intend to do that starting this spring. Building a large outdoor worm pit so I plan to give them shovelfuls of the wormy compost daily & let them have fun digging through it. Doesn't get much easier than that. Worms don't completely stop breeding in winter. They do slow down though. They simply dig down deeper to avoid freezing.
 
Jay Mullaky
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The pit idea sounds very interesting.

I watched a few videos on YouTube of guys catching large amount off worms using electric probes that cause the worms to come to the surface.

I have one area of land, approx 15 acres and it is packed full.off enormous worms. When fixing up a ditch I couldn't believe the size and quantity.

The videos I have seen have been DIY jobs but If I could buy a divice that would cause the worms to surface I would be able to collect huge amounts.

I am also wondering do people buy/grow caterpillars? After watching the swarms which appeared on my oak trees and kale I am wondering would it be a cheap way to get some 'natural' food for chickens, just pick a handful off caterpillars every now and then and Chuck them.in.to the chickens.

I am hoping I will be able to source a legit version of the DIY electric probe
 
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I have not read all three pages of this thread so here's hoping I'm not repeating.

I keep it simple. I have three 30 gallon garbage cans that i heave the worms into. I have put carboard and paper but the worms love cow plops. I mix the plops in water and make a porridge with a paint mixer.

I invert the can lids and put a hole in the top (bottom) to catch any rain.

That's it. I am gone a month at a time so it's good luck charlie, i hope you survive.
Right now the worms are dealing with some snow and freezing. Yet they live.

I had considered putting ( used) toilet paper in the can but i didn't want to be finding that later. Same with using human waste. Cow plops are fine.

The question is: can i put composting worms in with my root vegetables? I figured that i would build a long raised( bunny proof) bin , fill it with poor arizona soil, compost worms,  and fresh cow plops and let them work their magic. I might toss some buckets of juniper leaf to continue the experiment.

I have also put worms in a hole in the ground to see where they go. They have food and a plywood cover.
My area has a lot of potash. If you hear anything about "tremors" size worms in arizona i don't know anything about it.
 
Mike Barkley
master pollinator
Posts: 666
Location: mountains of Tennessee
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bee chicken homestead
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but the worms love cow plops



They sure do. It seems to be their favorite food.

The question is: can i put composting worms in with my root vegetables?



Yes.

 
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