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Dexter Cattle discussion

 
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Saralee Couchoud wrote:You might not like black cows but they bring 10% more at market. That said, I have red cows because I like the heritage breed Milking Devon. The good points far out way the sale price difference. In 15 years I have not had to pull one calf. My neighbor raises Angus and pulls about 1/2 his calves. Mine also live and produce into the late 20s not 10 years like modern cows



I agree but I really don't plan to sell at the barn... If I sell it will most likely be for breeding to another rancher or possibly to a close friend or relative who wants to put meat in the freezer.  I know Greg Judy will sell all his "long-legged" cows when he identifies them... he wants a small frame and he deselects those who don't fit this trait.  So, he says even though Red doesn't bring as much, the long-legged Red brings more than if he brought his best short-legged cow cuz that's what conventional farmers will buy... They like the "biggest, tallest cow" for their herd.

But also, you get more lbs per acre raising short-legged red cows (at least with South Polls)

I got enamored with Red Devons for beef cattle and had a fellow who owned a herd of about 60 - he and a few others likely single-handedly saved that breed from extinction - they formed a breed organization for Red Devons and over a period of years it has come back and is thriving.  The marble up finishing on grass is what I hear.  But very expensive.
 
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Gray Henon wrote:Will Dexters marble up if grain finished?  We raised a grassfed steer several years ago.  It was good, but the meat didn't have the slightest bit of intramuscular fat.  I'd like some marbling on the next one.



I don't have cows so I might be dumb, My understanding was grass finishing doesn't produce the heavy marbling.
Intramuscular fat is a sign of metabolic syndrome, fatty liver disease I hear.  Everything about grassfed is better for the health or the ruminant when compared to high grain intake.
I love to eat, but i'm not a beef connoisseur so I cannot speak on breed. From my experience the yellow fat is the flavor which comes from the grass while the white fat is juicy without as much flavor.
 
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If you finish them on grain the omega 3 to omega 6 ratio goes from 1 to 5 for grass finished to 1 to 15 for grain finished. You can get just as much marbling in the meat and still have grass finished if you finish them on alfalfa. And it doesn't matter what breed, this is true for all. However, a big Holstein will eat 3 times as much and give about the same number pounds of beef as a smaller breed and the smaller cattle will taste better. That is because something like a Holstein is all bones and appetite. They are not thrifty
 
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Hey there!
First time dexter grower here.
Our 7 year old mama (Nellie) has a one month old steer calf (Soot). We would like to separate them soon to start milking her and do a calf share.

My question is: since the calf is so small, he can fit through a lot of openings. I have a large wire dog kennel that would fit him perfectly if it is deemed safe....

So my plan is to have them both in one stall overnight, so they can be together, but with him in the kennel.

Advice?
 
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My family and I are currently on the hook for two Dexter calves that will be ready/halter trained by late Nov to Dec this year.

We went and took a look in person this past Saturday. They really are some beautiful cows. The skiddish ones they had would still take cookies out of your hand. The halter trained ones (Bull included) we like pet dogs coming up for a scratching.

The seller is catching them today to start the halter training process.

I am going for homozygous polled (though hetero is fine too), Red/or Dunn, A2/A2 milk, non-chondro, non-PHA.

Then over time we hope to step up the quality of udders and genetics that gain heavier beef.

Just looking to keep a few cows long-term... and then being able to sell heifer calves to pay for hay some years... and grow out steer for the personal fridge.

Subscribed....

6324548B-9993-4EED-A62D-AC5D96004494.jpeg
[Thumbnail for 6324548B-9993-4EED-A62D-AC5D96004494.jpeg]
 
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I haven’t been on here in a while because I am still not getting notifications of posts to this thread. I have read through some of the new to me posts. First comment I have is purebred Dexters do not come in silver. The accepted colors are red, black and dun. Dun is a brown color. “White Dexters” are not purebred Irish Dexters. They are a different breed resulting from crossing Irish Dexters with British white cattle. They have their own registry and are not eligible for registration in PDCA, ADCA or the Legacy Dexter registry.

There were questions about Dexters and climate. The PDCA has a new slogan, “any size acreage, any sustainable climate, Irish Dexters will work for you”. This breed is truly adaptable to any climate that can sustain life. Other questions involved milk production, calf sharing etc. Dexter cow milk production depends on the individual cow, how she is fed, how many times a day she is milked, her bloodlines etc. One can expect at least a half gallon a day from low producers up to as much as two to three gallons a day. Butterfat content can approach 5%.

Many readers of this thread have numerous questions. It is exciting to see a growing interest in this amazing small breed. Our breed association, Purebred Dexter Cattle Association PDCA has several sources for information on the Irish Dexter breed. I’ll list them here:

dexterstoday.com
Is the PDCA website and offers all kinds of info on the breed.

dextermarketplace.com
Is the place to buy/sell Dexter cattle and locate breeders.

Dexters Today E-magazine
Is our PDCA electronic magazine and can be found on our website. You can subscribe and get on our email list. Comes out bimonthly.

PDCA has a mentor program for those needing help in several different areas including milking. Mentor program info can be found on our website.

Dexters today community is our FaceBook discussiongroup. Ask any questions for open discussion.

More PDCA sources for info and help are being developed and will be available in the near future.

For those interested in becoming a breeder and developing an Irish Dexter herd, the PDCA has launched a breed improvement program called DexStar. DexStar uses genomic testing and phenotype evaluation to help breeders improve their cattle and ultimately the breed.


 
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Ron Metz wrote:I haven’t been on here in a while because I am still not getting notifications of posts to this thread. I have read through some of the new to me posts. First comment I have is purebred Dexters do not come in silver. The accepted colors are red, black and dun. Dun is a brown color. “White Dexters” are not purebred Irish Dexters. They are a different breed resulting from crossing Irish Dexters with British white cattle. They have their own registry and are not eligible for registration in PDCA, ADCA or the Legacy Dexter registry.

There were questions about Dexters and climate. The PDCA has a new slogan, “any size acreage, any sustainable climate, Irish Dexters will work for you”. This breed is truly adaptable to any climate that can sustain life. Other questions involved milk production, calf sharing etc. Dexter cow milk production depends on the individual cow, how she is fed, how many times a day she is milked, her bloodlines etc. One can expect at least a half gallon a day from low producers up to as much as two to three gallons a day. Butterfat content can approach 5%.

Many readers of this thread have numerous questions. It is exciting to see a growing interest in this amazing small breed. Our breed association, Purebred Dexter Cattle Association PDCA has several sources for information on the Irish Dexter breed. I’ll list them here:

dexterstoday.com
Is the PDCA website and offers all kinds of info on the breed.

dextermarketplace.com
Is the place to buy/sell Dexter cattle and locate breeders.

Dexters Today E-magazine
Is our PDCA electronic magazine and can be found on our website. You can subscribe and get on our email list. Comes out bimonthly.

PDCA has a mentor program for those needing help in several different areas including milking. Mentor program info can be found on our website.

Dexters today community is our FaceBook discussiongroup. Ask any questions for open discussion.

More PDCA sources for info and help are being developed and will be available in the near future.

For those interested in becoming a breeder and developing an Irish Dexter herd, the PDCA has launched a breed improvement program called DexStar. DexStar uses genomic testing and phenotype evaluation to help breeders improve their cattle and ultimately the breed.




Awesome post! I shall look into those resources. I do indeed have a desire to build a decent genetics herd over time. Just a very small herd.

Here is a pic of the grass fed bull/ sire of the calves I am buying. He is Dunn and carry's Red. I see the potential…

0350FA55-1209-4157-B05F-43A411F8DA21.jpeg
[Thumbnail for 0350FA55-1209-4157-B05F-43A411F8DA21.jpeg]
 
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Hello friends you are talking about Dexters that originated in Ireland and are the smallest breed of non miniature cattle. But can you tell me more.
 
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