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What's your favorite native/wild fruit to harvest and eat?

 
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Wild black pin cherry, muscadine,blackberry, blue berry, crabapple, persimmon.
 
pollinator
Posts: 197
Location: Missoula, MT
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silver buffaloberry (shepherdia argentea)
 
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I agree with Phil Stevens, wild raspberries are to me the best find
 
Posts: 91
Location: King William, VA
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dog forest garden trees cooking food preservation homestead
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Tereza Okava wrote:

Joshua LeDuc wrote:
Tereza, just curious, how do you prepare and eat your bamboo?


Joshua, that is a topic of much debate in my family. My uncle insists that the bamboo you use to make fishing rods (a thin bamboo) is the best, but we tend to hunt the solid dark green bamboo that is thicker (about your wrist thickness). I've also had the big, big wide dark green bamboo, but that usually requires an axe to get the shoots, and the green bamboo you just twist off.
I don't THINK any bamboo is poisonous (I am, however, no expert) but some is much more bitter than others.
We pull them, the picture shows one that is just about perfect (much longer than that and they start getting woody). You peel them til you get to the tender center, discarding any parts that the knife doesn't slide through easily (like okra: if you can feel fibrous stuff, it's not worth eating). You will probably discard 80%+ of the volume, it is that much.
What is left, we slice into small pieces. That gets a soak in salt water, then a rinse, then boil for a bit (maybe 20-30 min). The water should turn yellowish. If they are still bitter, boil and rinse and discard again. I've had some where it takes a few boiling sessions to get rid of the yellow water (those big, big bamboo shoots you have to cut with the axe, especially).
After that, they can get sliced up and mixed with stuff inside dumplings or steamed buns, cooked in soup, fried up with black and red pepper and soy sauce....



That is some very helpful information Tereza.  Thanks!
 
Joe Grand
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Bamboo. It is my understanding all bamboo can be eaten, but some are sweeter than others.
I have been told you can harvest sprout year around, but in winter you have to dig up the tender sprouts.
I am looking at chipping the green mature cains for pathway mulch. We have the 2 inch green bamboo.
 
Joshua LeDuc
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Location: King William, VA
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Joe Grand wrote:Bamboo. It is my understanding all bamboo can be eaten, but some are sweeter than others.
I have been told you can harvest sprout year around, but in winter you have to dig up the tender sprouts.
I am looking at chipping the green mature cains for pathway mulch. We have the 2 inch green bamboo.



Good information and ideas Joe!  I know this spring when the shoots were tender, we stripped the outer green layers off and gave 2 foot long pieces to our puppy to chew on.  She loved it!  

I wonder what the texture of bamboo mulch would be and how long it would last?  Does anybody have pictures or stories about bamboo mulch?
 
gardener
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Location: South of Capricorn
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I`ve run the leftovers (the sheaths and trimmings) through the wood chipper after we`ve gone bamboo shooting-- the rabbits didn't want to eat these things, which was unusual. It hasn't been any different from the rest of my mulch (mostly yard trimmings, passionfruit vines, and lots of sugarcane bagasse).
 
Joshua LeDuc
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Location: King William, VA
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Tereza Okava wrote:I`ve run the leftovers (the sheaths and trimmings) through the wood chipper after we`ve gone bamboo shooting-- the rabbits didn't want to eat these things, which was unusual. It hasn't been any different from the rest of my mulch (mostly yard trimmings, passionfruit vines, and lots of sugarcane bagasse).



Bamboo shooting?  I had to think about that one for a minute!  LOL...
 
Joe Grand
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I found this guy on youtube & he seems to know a good bit about eating bamboo. I am going to try the mounding soil around the shoot to keep it tender longer.
Much the way asparagus is grown.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FuDeegj8bJk
 
Tereza Okava
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Joshua LeDuc wrote:Bamboo shooting?


Darn tooting!

(in these troubled times, I've got to get my amusement where I can)
 
Joshua LeDuc
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Location: King William, VA
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Joe Grand wrote:I found this guy on youtube & he seems to know a good bit about eating bamboo. I am going to try the mounding soil around the shoot to keep it tender longer.
Much the way asparagus is grown.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FuDeegj8bJk



Interesting!
 
Posts: 75
Location: Suffolk County, Long Island NY
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Every fall, I can harvest a gallon of autumn olives in 10 minutes.  I make jam with it; it is a bit tart so I add a bit of cinnamon and it tastes like Christmas! I also harvest wineberry, also known as wine raspberry, in large amounts, but always leaving plenty for the birds.  I COULD harvest hickory nuts, walnuts, and chestnuts, but I am allergic to tree nuts !  What a waste!
 
pollinator
Posts: 292
Location: the mountains of western nc
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forest garden trees foraging chicken food preservation cooking wood heat homestead
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it's blackcap season!
blackcaps.jpg
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Wild sweet cherry jam on pancakes...
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pollinator
Posts: 156
Location: Missouri. USA. Zone 6b
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Dewberry. I used to have a patch growing but that area is taken over by Japanese honeysuckle and poison ivy. I am a bit disappointed my thornless blackberries are not as sweet as wild dewberry.
 
gardener
Posts: 1946
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
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I hadn't heard of dewberry before, sounds like an awesome berry! Supposedly a major producing area for them in the past was only about an hour away from here. Definitely going to be on the lookout to see if I can find some growing wild near here!
 
pollinator
Posts: 226
Location: CW Ontario, Zone 5
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This is a great little thread!

I love the wild black raspberries that grow all around my house.  They are just the best. They are pretty darn seedy, but man are they tasty!

If anyone is interested we are having a little online wild food cooking class where we go over a bunch of recipes using wild plants.  It's a lot of fun.  The link is in my signature.
 
greg mosser
pollinator
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Location: the mountains of western nc
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the blackberries follow the blackcaps. they don't quite measure up in taste for me, but i won't argue with all the free berries! the blackcaps are probably 75% done now.
blackb.jpg
blackberry time!
blackberry time!
 
pollinator
Posts: 131
Location: Zone 8B Blackland Prairie, Tx
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Figs and Pomegranates grow wild all around where I live. Figs are probably the easiest to harvest; the pomegranates tend to have very small fruit and you have to beat the critters to them when they get ripe!

There's a lot of wild buffalo gourd around us too, but I haven't experimented with it yet; it can be poisonous due to high levels of saponins. I think I'm going to try to harvest some seeds this year. They are really bitter if you don't get all the flesh off. Supposedly they taste like pumpkin seeds when you roast them, and they have a pretty good protein content!
 
Steve Thorn
gardener
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Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
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It's always nice to find 4 different wild fruits within just a few feet of each other!


 
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Well it is Huckleberry Season here in the High Country of Idaho. This year is a banner year for the beautiful, small, dark purple Huckleberries.
They are the tastiest and best type of berry to add to pancakes, waffles, muffins, and mix with apples to make the most heavenly apple pie one could imagine.

Anyone up there in Montana, or Wash. state been picking them yet? My wife and I did pick about a gallon of them on Monday this week.
 
Posts: 389
Location: West Midlands UK (zone 8b) Rainfall 26"
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I reckon if people can add fungi to this thread, I can add nuts...  it's a good year for sweet chestnuts! My teenager has been bringing them home from the school field, which has intrigued his friends, and we've been peeling and grilling or boiling them.
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Don't count your weasels before they've popped. And now for a mulberry bush related tiny ad:
100th Issue of Permaculture Magazine - now FREE for a while
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