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Good Morning Everyone!

Here is the Permaculture plant list from yesterdays "Trees" talk. We are coming near the end of an incredible two weeks of learning - Permaculture - Concepts, Themes in Design, Methods of Design, Patterns in nature and landscape, Bees, Soils, Design (Zone,Sector, Aspect, Slope analysis), Water, Climates, Climatic factors in element design, Aquaculture, Trees and their energies, Composts, Organic Inputs, Soil building techniques, Vermiculture, Earthworks, Hands on heavy equipment use, Reading the landscape, Formal Landscape design, Sepp Holtzer-culture, Joel Salitin views on Holistic Management- broad Acre, Alan Savory (to come) -Plains and Savannah, TO come ( Urban Permaculture, Natural Building, Alternative Nation and Communities, Careers in Permaculutre - become an PDC Instructor, a Permaculture Land Manager, Apprenticeships, Internships.




PERMACULTURE PLANTS

• Albizia or Cape Wattle - Albizia lopantha (syn. Paraserianthes lopantha)
Leguminous, fast-growing evergreen small tree 4 - 8 m, although occasionally they can grow taller. Useful as a windbreak, shelter tree, soil conditioner (nitrogen-fixing) and stock feed. Attracts ladybirds into garden for aphid control. Fire retardant. Understorey plant in the forests of the south-west. Yellow, cream or green flowers.
• Bamboo - Bambusa multiplex
Generally grows in a slowly spreading clump to about 4m high, which is a small bamboo. Useful for erosion control as well as stock feed. Stock eat the leaves and plant down during autumn or winter, and then it will rejuvenate during spring. Good windbreak and screen plant, and culms can be used as garden stakes. Cold hardy.
• Brisbane Wattle - Acacia fimbriata
Bushy shrub to 4m. Excellent windbreak or orchard legume. Nitrogen-fixing. Yellow flowers in spring.
• Carob -Ceratonia siliqua
Slow growing, large spreading tree. Likes dry Mediterranean climate and tolerates poor sandy soils. The seeds yield a gum which is used in the cosmetic industry. The sugary pods are used as human food as well as for stock. Chocolate substitute powder is produced for health food industry.
• Chanar- Geoffroea decorticans
Deciduous, small tree to 7m. Nitrogen-fixing, orange-yellow flowers and edible pod tasting like caramel fudge. Used to make sweets and drinks.
• Curry-leaf Tree - Murraya keonigii
Small, deciduous tree to 3 m with very pungent aromatic leaves. The leaves are used in curries in Asian cooking. Tolerates partial shade. Hardy.
• Curry Plant - Helichrysum angustifolium
Suitable for most soils, and is drought and frost tolerant. Small perennial shrub to 0.4 m, silver leaves, yellow flowers. Strong curry smell, and a small twig can be added to soups, vegetable dishes and stews to give a mild curry flavour. Remove twig before serving. Flowers used in potpourri.
• Drumstick Tree - Moringa oleifera
As the tree produces leaves during the dry season and during times of drought, it is an excellent source of green vegetable when little other food is available. The leaves provide many necessary vitamins and minerals and can be eaten cooked or dried. The foliage has been compared to spinach in both its appearance and nutritional quality. The juice from the leaves is believed to stabilize blood pressure, the flowers are used to cure inflammations, the pods are used for joint pain, the roots are used to treat rheumatism, and the bark can be chewed as a digestive aid.
• Feijoa - Feijoa sellowiana
Also known as pineapple guava. Bushy evergreen shrub to 4m, drought and frost tolerant, good windbreak. Fruit eaten raw or used in jellies. Prefers cool climates and rich organic soil.
• Five Spice, or Five in One Herb - Coleus aromaticus (syn C. amboinicus)
Succulent, semi-creeping perennial. Needs protected place from winds, heavy rain. Likes a warm, moist area. Round, fleshy, hairy stems and oppositely forming thick, hairy, ovate shaped leaves 4-10cm long, with serrated/scalloped margins. Spikes of two-lipped mauve/pink flowers rise above the foliage Leaves can be chopped up and added to bean dishes, soups and casseroles to give a mixed herb flavour. Chew a leaf for sore throat and coughs. Make a tea for bronchitis, asthma and coughs, and to induce sleep. A leaf can been rubbed or laid on the forehead, to relieve headaches
• Golden Wreath Wattle or Western Wattle or S.W. Wattle - Acacia saligna
Large leaved wattle from the south-west of W.A. Good fodder for sheep, goats, horses and cattle. Fast-growing, fire retardant, nitrogen-fixing shrub to 4 m. It is suitable for soil stabilisation and does well in sand near coastal areas and is ideal for wind break and erosion control. Aborigines used to make flour from the seeds.
Honey Locust - Gleditsia triacanthos
There are two varieties of the deciduous Honey Locust; one thorned and the other thornless. The thornless variety is the most common. Honey Locust grow to 20 m, and they are drought and frost-hardy. The seed pods are high in sugar (up to 30%) and both the seeds and pods are 10% protein. Produces golden leaves as the season changes from autumn to winter.
• Ice Cream Bean - Inga edulis
Fast growing, nitrogen-fixing, evergreen tree to height 10 m and spread of 4 m. Drought and frost sensitive when young, white flowers, pinnate leaves. Seed pods up to 18 cm. The white pith around each seed can be eaten and tastes like vanilla ice cream. Wood can be used for furniture and the leaves for feeding stock.
• Leucaena - Leucaena leucocephala
A fast-growing, leguminous tree to 15 m. Suitable for coppicing for firewood, high-quality forage (both leaves and pods), erosion control and as a source of mulch. Leucaena is a nitrogen-fixing tree.
• Maqui - Aristotelia chilensis
Evergreen shrub or small tree to 4m. Dioecious plants are either male or female. Female plants produce green flowers followed by small, black, edible berries which can be eaten fresh or used for juices, wine or dyeing. Good honey plant.
• Olive - Olea europaea
A rich source of fat and oil which is obtained by pressing the fruit. Drought and frost tolerant once established. Grows to 20 m but can easily be pruned and maintained to enable olives to be harvested. Require very little fertiliser, but needs full sun and rich, well-drained soil. Common varieties we sell include:
* Manzanillo large green olive for pickling.
* Volos large green or black eating olive.
* New Norcia (WA) Mission for oil production.
• Paulownia or Powton - Paulownia tomentosa
One of the fastest growing trees in the world. Paulownia is a drought-resistant, fast-growing, deciduous tree to 12 m. The timber is used for fine furniture, the leaves as mulch or fodder. Good shade plant.
• Rosella - Hibiscus sabdariffa
Native to West Africa, Rosella is an annual bush to 2 m. The red fleshy sepals of the fruit seed pod are used in drinks, jam making and in preserves. Tender leaves can be used in salad and as a savoury herb. The stem yields a fibre which can be used as a string substitute in the garden.
• Salal - Gaultheria shallon
Evergreen shrub to 2m. Edible black berries which can be eaten fresh or made into jam and wine. Foliage used by florists.
• Siberian Pea Tree - Caragana arborescens
Tree to 6m. Deciduous, nitrogen-fixing, and leaves produce a blue dye. Useful windbreak, yellow flowers. Seeds are edible, usually after cooking and make good chicken forage.
• Sun Hemp - Crotalaria juncea
Annual shrub to 2m. Fast-growing legume. Hardy and drought-resistant. Fibre used as twine, nets and paper. Green manure crop and useful mulch.
• Vetiver Grass - Vetiveria zizanioides
This species grows fast to form a dense clump about 30 cm in diameter and a height of 50-150 cm. It is very useful in trapping crop residues and silts eroded by runoff, as a raw material for making paper and for ropes, mats, hats and baskets. The roots are used in making skin care substances and volatile oils are extracted for making perfume and aromatic ingredients in soaps. The leaves provide animal fodder for sheep and cattle.
• Vietnamese Coriander - Polygonum odoratum
Hot spicy leaves are used to flavour meat and vegetables, and for the soupy noodle dish laksa. Grows to 30 cm and leaves are tapered with brown central markings. Prefers moist conditions and protection from the sun.


"Plant it Forward" perhaps we can be our class moto........

very best guys,

Howard



 
Howard Story
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Oh ! "HAPPY CANADA DAY" Eh!
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Howard Story
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More goodies


SOME PROPERTY PURCHASE CHECKLIST CONSIDERATIONS ; YOU WANT TO KNOW IS THE LAND GOOD FOR USE = ELEMENTS OF LAND - EFFICIENT FOR THE ENERGY AND EFFORT YOU PUT IN:
1. LATITUDE - WHAT CLIMATE ARE WE IN?
2. ALTITUDE-100M (300’) ALTITUDE UP = 1 DEGREE LAT. N
3. DISTANCE FROM OCEAN - MARITIME EFFECT AND MEDITERRANEAN EFFECT
4. SHADE - TROPICS
5. SUN – COLD CLIMATE
6. WATER – ACCESS, STORAGE (HIGH AS POSSIBLE)
7. ACCESS – HOW TO ACCESS TO AND WITHIN THE PROPERTY –HIGH COST OF INSTILLATION, IS IT FIRE BREAK, HEAT STORE, CAN CAUSE EROSION, OR CREATE WATER COLLECTION – SHOULD BE MULTIFUNCTIONAL – WHERE ARE HOUSE AND BUILDING STRUCTURES
8. SLOPE/STEEPNESS – OVER 20 DEGREES AWKWARD VERY DIFFICULT
9. FLAT LAND – NO GRAVITY FALL, WIND EFFECT, HOT WINDS, NEED TO PUMP WATER, WIND /SOLAR TO MOVE WATER
10. MEDITERRANEAN CLIMATE – HAS EXTREMES TEMP, FIRE BIG ISSUE
11. FLOOD EVENTS – MORE AND MORE IMPORTANT – 100 YEAR FLOOD EVENTS –
12. VEGETATION COVER – TO LITTLE COVER ON RURAL ACREAGE AS OPPOSITE IN CITIES TO MUCH
13. PREVAILING WIND
14. FIRE EXPOSURE
15. SUN ASPECT AND ORIENTATION
16 WIND EVENTS - TORNADO'S
17. SOILS
18. EXISTING STRUCTURES
19. EXISTING FLORA AND FAUNA
20. PAST USE? - CHEMICALS? OILS?
21. SERVICES?
22. BY-LAWS - REGULATIONS
23.



 
pollinator
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Albizia....just a comment. This tree can grow quite tall and leggy here in the tropics. During the last hurricane and winds, this species is responsible for the incredible damage caused in the Puna district of Hawaii. Hundreds and hundreds of these trees blew down. Extreme damage to homes, vehicles, barns, and infrastructure. Roads blocked for days and weeks. The county is now proposing the removal of all albizia . The tree is considered an invasive because it readily self sows and spreads. While it can be q unite advantageous when managed, it can pose a danger when not.
 
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Excavator time!
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Brian teaching
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Todd
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Curtis
 
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I was excited to read the list of permaculture plants, and thought since the course is being taught in Montana, with a colder winter than mine, thought it would be a good list for me. I recognized a few of them as being totally unsuitable for my climate, and noticed a lot of them were unfamiliar to me, and having been an avid North American botanist and horticulturist, suspect many of them are not of North America. Nothing wrong with that. I'm not so provincial I think the world revolves around North America, I just want to know at least know where they originated so I can know where to look for them, and if they'll grow here.

I grow vetivert, but bring it inside for the winter (or mulch it deeply),

Moringa (got the seeds from peace corps volunteers when I visited Africa) I would not trust this one to mulch I keep trying to get it to flower so I can get seeds from the ones I am growing. This one is said to adapt quickly from one generation to the next, but I need the seeds from my plants!

The Roselle/hibiscus did not mature in this climate, but I think that's because my soil was so thin and impoverished when I tried them. I'll be trying again.

The feijoa, or guava needs a mild winter. It will take some frost, but not frozen ground.


I just wonder if any one else can add notations about where these plants grow and or under what conditions.

Thanks

Thekla
 
Michael Newby
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Not really part of the formal PDC but I did get a chance to demonstrate some proper timber falling techniques. Not very tall trees (<60') but big enough that they would be a problem for the electric saws they have here.
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Big(ish) log
 
Michael Newby
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Hands on with rabbit processing. We salted the hides and collected the brains to try out brain tanning the hides. The hides were salted and stretched over a board/log to cure overnight until we can tan them.
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Michael Newby
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Enjoying the amazing stew Stewart made with the rabbit!
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Michael Newby
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Everyone is hard at work getting their designs figured out and put down on paper.
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Burning the midnight oil
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Heavy discussion
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Hard at work
 
Michael Newby
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Bittersweet last day of the course. I've had the chance to become friends with some amazing people here. I can't wait to see what everyone goes on to do after this. Good luck everyone, I expect great things!
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pollinator
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Sweet
 
Michael Newby
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Woo Hoo! Less than two weeks out of the PDC at Paul's place and I've got my first real design project: Basic earthworks and plantings on about 90 acres of a 150 acre horse rescue property. Talk about excited, I've got a new transit level on order just for the job. I've been hired to survey and design the site as well as supervise the earthworks and the planting phases. If they see results then they have multiple other properties that they would like me to look at as well as friends who need their broad acre projects designed. Once I get permission from the owners I'll be posting pictures of the property and try to keep good photographic evidence of the whole process so I can share it here.
 
Howard Story
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Michael Newby wrote:Everyone is hard at work getting their designs figured out and put down on paper.



Good designs everyone.
 
Howard Story
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Michael Newby wrote:Woo Hoo! Less than two weeks out of the PDC at Paul's place and I've got my first real design project: Basic earthworks and plantings on about 90 acres of a 150 acre horse rescue property. Talk about excited, I've got a new transit level on order just for the job. I've been hired to survey and design the site as well as supervise the earthworks and the planting phases. If they see results then they have multiple other properties that they would like me to look at as well as friends who need their broad acre projects designed. Once I get permission from the owners I'll be posting pictures of the property and try to keep good photographic evidence of the whole process so I can share it here.



CONGRATULATIONS MICHAEL !!
If you need support, got questions or just want to bounce ideas. I'm here to help!
 
Michael Newby
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howie story wrote:CONGRATULATIONS MICHAEL !!
If you need support, got questions or just want to bounce ideas. I'm here to help!



Thanks, Howie. I'll be taking you up on that.
 
Lab Ant
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Congrats Mike! If your client doesn't mind, make sure to post lots of pictures of the design, and the before, after, and later.
 
Howard Story
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Hey Everyone looking for land to farm and interested in Sustainable food and living. Here is a great list of resources and information. here are food incubators and accelerator programs that offer business support from industry experts mostly for free.

As you know farmers are the backbone of resilient local and regional food systems, yet many are aging or retiring. The FarmLASTS Project at the University of Vermont estimates that 70 percent of farmland in the United States will change hands over the next two decades. The age of the average U.S. farmer is 58.3 years old, and rural populations are declining as a percentage of the national population, according to U.S. Census Data.

To create a sustainable food system, we need to cultivate young farmers. Supporting beginning farmers needs to be a collaborative effort—one that connects young people with both financial and technical resources and provides the knowledge necessary to develop a successful business. New farmers also need sustainable funding and mutual partnerships with investors, which are increasingly found outside of traditional investment models.

“When starting a business, it is very important to have accurate information that feeds into your business plan,” says beginning farmer Dan Berube. “Expectations are everything in life. Many beginning farmers are coming from families that haven't farmed for a few generations now, so it is hard for them to know what they are getting themselves into.”

Researchers from Tufts University note that new farmers are more likely to face financial hardships than veteran farmers. Beginning farmers lack access to land, capital, and established marketplaces for their products. Moreover, new farmers often lack the technical expertise and business knowledge needed to run a successful farm.

Fortunately, food incubators and accelerator programs can offer business support from industry experts, technical assistance, introductions to markets, mentoring, and training, thereby helping new and existing farmers to overcome barriers to entering farming. These initiatives help beginning farmers to launch new businesses, expand existing operations, and increase their incomes.

Here are 30 resources available for producers who are working to create food sovereignty and sustainable farm business models, ranging from food and farm incubators to sources of grant money and microloans:

SHARE this list with your social network! I t comes from Foodtank.


[list]ACDI/VOCA—a private, nonprofit organization—envisions a world in which empowered people can succeed in the global economy. To achieve this vision, ACDI/VOCA promotes “economic opportunities for cooperatives, enterprises, and communities through the innovative application of sound business practice.” Programs specific to agriculture include Farmer-to-Farmer, the Cooperative Development Program II (CDPII), and implementation of the U.S. Agency for International Development’s (USAID) Feed the Future.

[list]AgDevCo is a social impact investor and agribusiness project developer that aids in the financing of sustainable agricultural business opportunities in Africa. Additionally, AgDevCo supports the development of agriculture-supporting infrastructure, such as irrigation and bulk storage. Once commercially viable, AgDevCo transfers the businesses to primarily national ownership and then reinvests funds in other early-stage agriculture development projects.

[list]AgriBusiness Incubator (ABI) at International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), founded in 2003 in India, promotes agricultural technologies developed by ICRISAT and other research and development institutions. ICRISAT focuses on five strategic areas: seeds, biofuels, ventures to develop particular innovations (products or services), farming (high-value crops), and agricultural biotechnology. Additional outreach strategy includes collaborative business incubation.

[list]AgroEcology Fund is a “collaboration of donors working to coordinate and sustain agricultural systems that build on the existing skills and practices of local farming communities.” The Fund awards grant money to eligible projects; in 2012, the AgroEcology Fund awarded US$1 million to six partners for a two-year grant period. Supported by an advisory board of global experts, the Fund is currently working on its second round of grantmaking.

[list]Center for Environmental Farming Systems (CEFS) Incubator Farm Project understands that access to land is one of the biggest obstacles new farmers face. To address this problem, CEFS works with communities in North Carolina to repurpose land into new farm incubators. These farmers “pay” for their land with services to the community and fresh farm products. Participants also have access to training and technical assistance opportunities in farm business and production.

[list]Consortium for Enhancing University Responsiveness to Agribusiness Development Limited (CURAD) is one of six agribusiness innovation incubator programs in Africa aimed at generating jobs and boosting incomes within the agricultural sector. CURAD’s target clients include student startups, as well as small and medium wholesale and retail, coffee processing, and agribusiness enterprises.

[list]Dirt Works, an incubator farm in South Carolina, provides farmers launching a new business with infrastructure and support for up to three years. For a minimal fee, participants receive acreage, access to a tractor, packing facility, walk-in cooler, tool storage, irrigation, and assistance from a mentor farmer. After farmers’ three years are up, Dirt Works helps match these farmers with prospective land on which to expand businesses.

[list]FamilyFarmed works to increase the production, marketing, and distribution of food that is produced locally and justly. To achieve this goal, FamilyFarmed offers trainings in farming, wholesale success, and food safety; provides access to food hubs; helps expand markets for farmers and food artisans; brings together financing and innovation partners at its Good Food Conferences; and offers a Business Accelerator program that provides selected fellows with mentoring, support, and access to capital.

[list]Farm Aid helps build a family-farm-focused agricultural system through a variety of resources. The online Farmer Resource Network allows farmers to “access new markets, transition to more sustainable and profitable farming practices, and survive natural disasters." The Grant for Family Farm Agriculture program provides family farm organizations from across the country with grants ranging from US$500–US$20,000 annually.

[list]Food and Farm Communications Fund (FFCF) facilitates the strategic communication needed to create robust and resilient regional food systems. FFCF offers grants to a variety of programs, which the organization assesses for viability in market strategy and communications. Funding ranges from US$10,000–US$100,000.

[list]Food+Tech Connect is an online platform for good food innovators that uses technology and data to improve the food system. Through resources like its weekly newsletters, Food+Tech Connect helps to launch, grow, and transform companies committed to revolutionizing the food system. Additionally, Food+Tech Meetups and Hackathons discuss and undertake “some of the food industry’s greatest challenges.”

[list]Food-X helps companies tackling major challenges that affect the food sector through mentorship and education. During three-and-a-half-month programs, as many as 12 businesses meet in Food-X’s New York City office and receive intensive business mentorship from experienced entrepreneurs. Additionally, Food-X provides companies with US$50,000 to support them during this training and beyond.

[list]Grameen Bank has developed a new type of banking. Instead of traditional monetary deposits and other forms of collateral, the bank relies on accountability, mutual trust, creativity, and participation to provide credit to the poorest Bangladeshis. Grameen Bank uses a small-scale microcredit lending program (usually providing a few hundred U.S. dollars) to small enterprises in a variety of industries, including agriculture. Loans are only available to the poor, with a focus on women.

[list]GlobalGiving is a charity fundraising site that provides a fundraising platform for social entrepreneurs and nonprofit organizations from all over the world. Donors can search for different projects—focusing on causes such as education, feeding the hungry, building houses, training women with job skills, and many more meaningful objectives—to make contributions. Since its creation in 2002, GlobalGiving has over USD$184 million to help support close to 13,000 projects.

[list]Global Greengrants Fund has provided over USD$45 million in grants to people, foundations, and businesses supporting community-based projects that aim to make the world safer, healthier, and more just. These grants have addressed pressing issues—including biodiversity, climate change, energy and mining, food and agriculture, fresh water, sustainable livelihoods, marine and coastal conservation, and youth leadership—in 163 countries.

[list]Headwaters Farm Incubator Program leases out sections of Oregon’s East Multnomah Soil and Water Conservation District’s (EMSWCD) land to individuals looking to launch a new farming endeavor. Headwaters Farm hopes to develop qualified, experienced young farmers to reverse the trend of the aging farming population while also keeping good farmland in production and adding to the diversity of the “farmscape."

[list]Hot Bread Kitchen, located in New York City, offers two culinary workforces and business incubation programs, Project Launch and HBK Incubates. These initiatives give low-income men and women access to the food industry. Hot Bread Kitchen encourages immigrants in the incubation programs to provide recipes for “multi-ethnic” bread. The organization uses the recipes for training and sells the unique bread at retail and farmers market locations.

[list]Institute for Sustainable Development (ISD) promotes ecological agriculture based on local inputs and improved natural resources management in Ethiopia. The organization works to raise crop yields for local food security and improve ecosystem services for farmers, their families, and local communities. Initiatives include soil fertility enhancement (compost), push-pull technology, agroforestry, supporting innovative farmers, and adapting to the effects of climate change.

[list]La Cocina is an incubator kitchen based in San Francisco, CA. Focusing mainly on women from immigrant and minority communities, La Cocina aids in breaking down barriers—such as high cost of entry, fees for licensing and insurance, and availability of kitchen space—by providing commercial kitchen space and technical assistance to low-income women launching, growing, and formalizing food businesses.

[list]National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition Beginning Farmer and Rancher Development Program (BFRDP) is the only federally funded program dedicated exclusively to training the next generation of farmers and ranchers. BFRDP awards grants to academic institutions, state extension services, producer groups, and community organizations to support and train new farmers and ranchers across the United States.

[list]National Young Farmers Coalition works to secure the success of young farmers by supporting practices and policies that enable new farmers to create thriving businesses. The Coalition offers a variety of resources that help farmers overcome barriers and create strong, prosperous farming operations, including connecting farmers with land and jobs, training opportunities, a guide to finding credit and capital, and information on the organic certification.

[list]Navdanya Farmers Network has trained farmers across 17 Indian states in food sovereignty, seed sovereignty, and sustainable agriculture for two decades. Navdanya has set up over 100 community seed banks across India and taught food sovereignty and sustainable agriculture to over 500,000 farmers. The organization continues to promote nonviolent farming that protects biodiversity, small farmers, and the Earth.

[list]Opportunity International Agriculture Finance Program recognizes Africa is home to 25 percent of the world’s arable land, yet generates only about 10 percent of the world’s food output. Opportunity International is looking to change that by improving African agriculture through micro-financing. By providing farmers with loans, Opportunity International can aid farmers in gaining the resources, training, and knowledge necessary to create thriving agribusinesses.

[list]Pangea Giving for Global Change awards grants to small grassroots, community-based organizations throughout Latin America, Asia, and Africa. Grants are given to organizations working with community members to address pertinent issues, from children’s education and women’s rights to agricultural improvements, with solutions designed to have lasting social impacts. Funding ranges from USD$1,000–US$10,000, with a maximum award of USD$5,000 for first-year grants.

[list]Root Capital has helped grow prosperous rural economies in Latin America and Africa since 1999 by “lending capital, delivering financial training, and strengthening market connections for small and growing agricultural businesses.” Thus far, Root Capital has distributed over USD$740 million to over 530 businesses working towards building sustainable livelihoods.

[list]RSF Social Finance Seed Fund provides grantees with small gifts, ranging from US$500–US$5,000, to provide financial support for initiatives that address specific focus areas, one being food and agriculture. RSF seeks grant proposals that are credible, feasible, and sustainable; that foster collaborative work; that provide intended results and outcomes; and that have beneficial economic, ecological, and social impacts.

[list]Southern Oregon Farmer Incubator is a collaborative effort to train new and beginning farmers. The incubator has a three-year program with several components, including a program known as Growing Agripreneurs, which uses a one-acre teaching farm to train nine beginning farmers in designing and managing a new farm business. While working on the incubator, farmers sell their produce to the local Rogue Valley community.

[list]Small Planet Fund supports “courageous movements bringing to life citizen-led solutions to hunger, poverty, and environmental devastation around the world.” Each year, the fund awards grants to core grantees, a select group of organizations that receive annual funding, as to organizations at a critical point of development that are dedicated to social change.

[list]The Garden Project—based out of San Francisco and originally created to provide job training and support to former offenders—has its participants work in an intensive program learning organic horticulture and landscaping skills, preparing them for future agriculture-based jobs. The Garden Project donates all produce grown to local food pantries.

[list]Turing Foundation offers a Nature Conservation grant, which provides money to organizations working towards marine conservation, sustainable organic agriculture, and sustainable livestock production in Southeast Asia, the Pacific Islands, and Sub-Saharan Africa. Most grants are awarded to organizations proposing to work with local partners. Funds are usually over USD$33,000 (€30,000) per year, with some organizations receiving multi-million Euro grants over several years.

if you need more go to http://permacultureinstituteasia.com/grant-money-and-microloans/ for direct links or email me .

Have fun out there!
Howard Story
PRI PDC Instructor, Consultant
www.PermacultureInstituteAsia.com
PermiesAsia@gmail.com
 
Posts: 16
Location: N Idaho
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bee dog trees
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Holy crap, from an animal systems feeding standpoint... this stuff could be golden...

http://oregonstate.edu/ua/ncs/archives/2015/jul/osu-researchers-discover-unicorn-%E2%80%93-seaweed-tastes-bacon

Especially if it adds its flavor to the animals...... mmmm

On another note... Congrats MIKE! That's awesome you could put the PDC to use so quickly! Amazing!
 
Michael Newby
gardener
Posts: 697
Location: Mount Shasta, CA Zone 8a Mediterranean climate
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books chicken duck forest garden greening the desert hugelkultur trees woodworking
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Thanks for the support guys!

So I've got the okay to share the work I do so I've posted a few pictures on my projects page (see the link in my signature below). Instead of double posting here and on my projects page I'm just going to put the bulk of the pictures on my project page. I'll use this thread as more of a sounding board for ideas I'm bouncing around in my head while the projects thread will be where the more "final" stuff goes.

Right now I'm leaning towards a first phase of swales planted with lots of N-Fixers and native drought-resistant trees to create shade over the swales and for horses. In between the swales be Yeoman style keyline ripping in a dryland horse pasture planted to a mixture of natives and exotics that prove themselves in the area.
 
Michael Newby
gardener
Posts: 697
Location: Mount Shasta, CA Zone 8a Mediterranean climate
141
books chicken duck forest garden greening the desert hugelkultur trees woodworking
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I seem to remember the day we talked about slope created a bit of confusion for a good number of the class (myself included) so I wanted to share this page that helped me visualize/understand the relationship between % grade, gradient (ratio) and slope in degrees:

Engineering Toolbox Slope Page

I suggest poking around the whole site, it's a resource I use quite a bit.
 
Howard Story
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INPUTS
Many of us get our compost materials from elsewhere, perhaps the garden center or a local farmer.

And that's okay. Most of us are gardening on the side, doing other work that enables us to purchase these inputs, thus helping out the person we’re buying them from.

If a garden store or farmer is selling or giving away straw or manure, you’re helping them out my buying or taking it, so I have no problem with this.

But if we want to be truly self sustainable, we should be making (animal manure) and growing our own compost materials.

Growing sustainably permaculture means reserving 40 - 60% of your growing area for grasses, straws, legumes and crop residues (left overs from harvests) that will then be used to make your compost.
 
Michael Newby
gardener
Posts: 697
Location: Mount Shasta, CA Zone 8a Mediterranean climate
141
books chicken duck forest garden greening the desert hugelkultur trees woodworking
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So the project I mentioned before finally got some rain and the client sent me some pictures!



There's more on my project page. (link's in the signature)


Also, if you guys haven't seen what Todd's been doing (besides making awesome coffee) you should check out his thread. Pretty cool stuff going on.
 
brandon gross
pollinator
Posts: 242
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books duck forest garden hugelkultur urban wofati
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Hey so fellow PDC 2015'ers Started a Thread of Our slow moving work on our Homestead in GA.
Brandon and Nikki's in GA
 
brandon gross
pollinator
Posts: 242
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Man I still wish I could watch some of the footage that was shot while we were all here.
 
Listen. That's my theme music. That's how I know I'm a super hero. That, and this tiny ad told me:
Rocket Oven plan download
https://permies.com/t/rocket-oven-plans
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