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It is 2017 and incandescent is still better than LED  RSS feed

 
David Baillie
Posts: 38
Location: North central Ontario
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Bees wax versus tallow. Candle versus oil lamps.  Whale oil versus petroleum oil.  Oil versus gas.  Gas versus arc lights.  Arc versus incandescent.  Incandescent versus halogen versus xenon versus fluorescent.  And now led.  The wheel goes on and on.  I bought my first cfl 20 years ago.  I retired the last of the oldest ones 2 years ago.  I'm awaiting the death of the rest so I can justify replacing them with the new leds. Some cfl were horrible but those from well known manufacturers performed well the crummy ones performed badly.  My first forray into leds involved wiring diodes with a resistor for 12 volt units.  Those early ones with the first flawed manufacturing processes really were horrible.  Too blue with bad quality control and cheap components. Fast forward a decade and off the shelf units from national retailers are cheap and longlived.  As to the light quality Nothing holds a candle to daylight if you will pardon the play on words.  As to complexity I would say leds allow you to lessen the complexity of your power generation so it should count as a plus for them.  One of the main sources of complexity and failure is the driver which has to regulate voltage and also fit in the tight package of the traditional Edison bulb design.  Think of the screw in leds as a stopgap measure at best.  More and more the new units are enclosed with a separate driver to control one or a string of fixtures.  These new gen ones are modular, replaceable and extremely longlived. Also since they generate very little heat their enclosures are much less complex.  No metal junction box and elaborate heat dissipating solutions incandescent lights require. Available in many spectrums based on taste and task. Stick to well known manufacturers do your research and you will love them.
Led lover David Baillie
 
Henri Lentonen
Posts: 73
Location: Finland
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I find to very odd, that as LEDs operate with 2-3 voltage and you use 230 voltages from the wall socket, it is 100 times more they need, so we use energy to transform energy: also need resistors, which heat up usually more than the LED itself..

If you have right voltage, you dont need resistors or/and transformers with LEDs.
 
Henry Jabel
pollinator
Posts: 168
Location: Worcestershire, England
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I found this monster sized incandescent the other day and realised I would have to post it here!

This 1000W bulb was run on a dimmer switch (usually underpowered) in an outbuilding workshop at my parents old house. They built the workshop to help construct the house in the early 80's and it wasn't demolished until around 2004. So I reckon its has had at least 20 years of use of fairly consistent use and the filament looks as good as new. It wouldn't suprise me if my dad bought it second hand as didn't remember him having any spare giant lightbullbs of the same type.

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Joseph Bataille
Posts: 45
Location: Haiti
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What an eye opening post. Wow.

I searched through all of the posts that mention battery back-ups (electrical inverter power), because that is what is most relevant to me in Haiti. I buy CFL's, not because they "save the earth" or are "cheaper in the long run." I buy them because they let my inverter power run for a longer amount of time. In fact, in Haiti, the corner-store boutiques refer to CFLs as "inverter lights," because they help inverter power to last longer.

I was wondering how these calculations hold up when taking this matter into account. What about the cost of a generator being run more frequently? What about the decrease in the life-span of an inverter battery due to increased cycling? What about the strain on the actual inverter itself?

Unfortunately, I could not find any direct references to research in this vein. Perhaps one of you could point me to some...

I'd be happy to provide numbers (cost of batteries, cost of fuel, generator servicing, etc.) if someone wants to try to calculate. Or, if someone has a suggested calculation, post it here and I'll plug in for the variables.
 
Stacy Witscher
Posts: 69
Location: SF Bay Area
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To my mind, the discussion begins and ends with incandescents produce heat. I don't do heat. Most of my life, we had no heat, other than the occasional fire, solar in the late 70's, early 80's was terrible. Then as an adult, we couldn't afford it. I have heat now, but wouldn't use it, if I lived alone. As long as the house doesn't dip below 40 degrees, I'm good.
 
Wayne Ish
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Cool thread. Any idea where to find incandescent lighting experts? I'm looking for engineers who know about manufacturing parts - and have a good breadth of knowledge about the range of incandescent lights out there (in various frequency ranges). I'm working on a project and looking for consultants, engineering students, or whomever has the most experience in this "old fashioned" technology... Easy to find LED experts, of course
 
That feels good. Thanks. Here's a tiny ad:
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