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!! What we need to know about Soil  RSS feed

 
Bryant RedHawk
garden master
Posts: 2738
Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
224
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hau Gail, I use sea-90 in pastures, as free choice salt for all the animals, in the gardens and orchard, on the dinner table and for cooking. I use a whirly spreader, mostly because it speeds up the process of covering a lot of ground.
I use a half cup sprinkled by hand around every fruit tree. I first spread it two years ago and will do another treatment next year, mostly because I am adding more land to pastures from the forest and that area will benefit from the minerals.

BTW, the planet has 5,000 minerals now (earth started out with @250 from the original rocks that came together to create this planet), it is my opinion that the more variety of mineral content we can put into our soils, the better the nutrition will be for the consumers of what grows.
Himalayan sea salt (we use this for a finishing salt) is a good product but it is also lacking some 69 minerals contained in sea-90. It is far better than some feed store "salt block" for certain.
It is my feeling that anything we can use that will bring more and a variety of minerals to every aspect of living is a good thing.

Minerals have recently been shown to be integral to the formation of life on earth, life and minerals are intertwined so closely, you can't have life without minerals.

Redhawk
 
Ryan Hobbs
Posts: 55
Location: Ohio
4
books forest garden woodworking
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Hi, In regards to installment 4, I have added this company's mychorizae mix to my vegetable seed balls, and despite the lack of mention of radishes in the list linked below, the radishes in the control group were fingerling size, while radishes treated were very very large (like footballs). I was growing the heirloom Minowase Daikon. soil and watering conditions were otherwise the same, and the same ground grew all corn the previous year. Their ordinary size is elongated fingerling. My seedball mix always includes clay, dust from carving soapstone pipes, compost tea, and small amounts of fine sawdust (to prevent cracking). The addition of mychorizae being the only difference, the crop seed balls treated with it produced exceptionally well other than corn for which there was no noticeable difference. Tomatoes were noticeably larger, with the plants reaching to my hips and fruits having gained an inch of circumference. Further testing is needed before I submit a paper, but I have designed a battery of tests to determine the full effects including gross weight, water weight, dry weight, calories, and so on... My 900x microscope is broken (my oldest big brother likes to take things apart grrr), so I have to rely on scales, ph, etc... I'm considering cloning the test plants from cuttings to remove genetics as a factor, though radishes are not great for that.

http://www.fungi.com/plant-list/articles/plant-list.html

The Bacteria may have a relationship with the mychorizae fungi that we don't know about that results in greater nutrient uptake in plants that do not necessarily have a symbiotic relationship with the fungi. I intend to explore this hypothesis in the future as a possible explanation as to why the radishes were larger despite no known mychorizal relationship with the Brassicaceae family. should I gain access to a microscope, I may discover that there is a relationship that was overlooked or not.

I am rather enjoying this series and look forward to reading the rest.
 
Bryant RedHawk
garden master
Posts: 2738
Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
224
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Bacteria do indeed have symbiotic relationships with fungi, both micorrhizal and non micorrhizal fungi. There are exomycorrhizal and endomycorrhizal fungi, the exo species grow tight to and surrounding the feeding hair roots, while the endo species actually invade the root cells. Both varieties eat the bacteria, thus releasing those stored nutrients the bacteria was busy eating and breaking into component parts. One of the coolest things about these relationships is that the plant talks with the bacteria and fungi both through electronic and chemical communication paths, and the bacteria and fungi communicate as well. It is a finely tuned nutrient community that goes on in the soil and we are just now starting to see just how intertwined it all is. None of this communication goes on at peak speeds unless all the right minerals are in place and in the right quantities, this is under research as we speak. Time passed is also one of the things to look at in all considerations of this great mystery of the soil organisms and plants.

Redhawk
 
Harry Soloman
Posts: 35
Location: Pennsylvania, Dauphin County
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I will add this, on top of learning about soils and soil biology, learn about plant physiology and then specifically for the plants you are growing.

For me, it was about the soil first and terms of its biology and ecosystem.  The plant simply is a part of that cycle but we need to understand plant physiology as well.  Together this will unlock many aspects that will enable success and with experience and time greater success.

I am big fan of fungi perfecti, Mycorrhizae.  It helps create a bigger root uptake area which when all things correct is very impressive.

Keep on keepin, on Bryan Redhawk!
 
Bryant RedHawk
garden master
Posts: 2738
Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
224
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hau Harry, As you have noticed, Life is a circle and our earth mother is a circle (since a sphere can be described as a series of circles laid out in an ascending and descending order which creates a sphere).

minerals, water and electricity (lightening) created life on this planet, with out all the parts, we would not be here.
There is no part of the great hoop of life that is independent.
Each portion is dependent on every other portion.
Soil can not exist without plants, plants can not exist without soil. (soil can be thought of as the mineral rich medium that supports bacteria, fungi and all the other microbes that interact with roots)
Since all life is intertwined our job is to know as much as we can to help keep everything in proper balance.

Redhawk
 
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