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What is it.... the game! Post unknown objects to ID... and to stump others!

 
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Daniel Schneider wrote:

Jay Angler wrote:I was thinking it looked like something for shoe-making, but it wasn't like any of the typical wooden lasts I'd seen. Well done, Daniel!
I'd noticed it seemed to have "Canton" imprinted on it, which is associated with China, so I wonder if it is more commonly used in their version of shoe-making?



I'd thought it was referring to Canton Ohio

Yeah, well, Canajun, eh? Never even occurred to me.
 
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I'm a bit late, but I just got back from cider pressing at my parents house. My great-grandfather was a cobbler, and my parents have his old cobbler tools.

This type of last has both the left foot and right foot on it. That's why it looks like it has too shoes on it.

Here's my great-grandfather's:
20201003_113830.jpg
side view of the right/left cobblers last
side view of the right/left cobblers last
20201003_113835.jpg
Front (back?) view of the right-left cobblers last
Front (back?) view of the right-left cobblers last
20201003_113841.jpg
cobblers last in my hand for scale
cobblers last in my hand for scale
20201003_113846.jpg
front view of it, in my hand for scale
front view of it, in my hand for scale
 
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Oh cool! That's definitely the same type of animal as my thing! Thank you for looking! Wonder why all the cobbler stuff I have seen is so narrow. I have wide feet. No wonder shoes don't fit me.
 
Jay Angler
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Pearl Sutton wrote:Oh cool! That's definitely the same type of animal as my thing! Thank you for looking! Wonder why all the cobbler stuff I have seen is so narrow. I have wide feet. No wonder shoes don't fit me.

They can probably move the tool side to side to accommodate "wider", but would need too many separate ones to have every width. When a single cobbler did all the shoes for a small village and the surrounding farms, they would have made a wooden last for specific needs, judging by small historical museums I've visited.
 
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This was given to me years ago and they told me to guess what it was, I didn’t figure it out so they told me what it was. I thought it was very cool and then I forgot what it is. It says light my fire on the top and on the inside it says think wild eat civilized made in Sweden.
image.jpg
collapsible cup
image.jpg
Collapsible cup
 
Jay Angler
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It's a semi-collapsible portable cup for camping. A sippy cup with a few extra features.
 
Deborah Matt
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No way! Im laughing at myself because I don’t think that’s what I was told this is or my feelings have really changed...IMHO this is a ridiculous thing to spend money on. Thanks for the info! I’ll pass this along to my grandson, he doesn’t think anything’s ridiculous yet and he’s still pretty spilly. I can’t think of a time I ever needed to carry around an empty water bottle or collapse the one I have.
 
Pearl Sutton
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Me and the junk piles just get weird. I brought home a thing. No clue what it's made to do. Looks like it possibly is broken off?
This is one of the original photos of this set, before I increased contrast etc in photoshop:



The cleaned up shots:



I'm puzzled on  this one. The weird shape of the tips will probably be how someone figures it out. It's a very specialized thing.
 
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I'll give you a hint: it's for working on a vehicle. Older vehicles, mostly.
 
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Spring tool for drum brakes.
Removes and installs the two types of spring inside drum brakes.
 
Jordan Holland
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Yep! Here's how it's used:
https://onemanandhismustang.com/how-to-use-brake-spring-pliers/
 
Pearl Sutton
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Jordan Holland wrote:Yep! Here's how it's used:
https://onemanandhismustang.com/how-to-use-brake-spring-pliers/


Thank you! I kept that! I have old cars I fix.
:D
 
Jordan Holland
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Here's a fascinating piece I found. I had seen other versions of this, but never one quite like this. What really fascinated me about it is the geared mechanism. Can you figure it out?
20201021_180650.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20201021_180650.jpg]
20201021_180713.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20201021_180713.jpg]
20201021_180623.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20201021_180623.jpg]
 
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This is really an interesting 'thingy' you have! I can see that the 'c' clamp looking thing can move up and down one of the arms, and that the body can rotate about 30 degrees to the frame but after that, I'm at a loss.
Doesn't seem to be able to be bolted down to anything indicating that its portable.
 
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Gerry Parent wrote:This is really an interesting 'thingy' you have! I can see that the 'c' clamp looking thing can move up and down one of the arms, and that the body can rotate about 30 degrees to the frame but after that, I'm at a loss.
Doesn't seem to be able to be bolted down to anything indicating that its portable.



It is indeed portable, and I will add the hint that "C clamp looking thing" is an adjustment for amount of travel in use.
 
Jay Angler
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Jordan Holland wrote:

It is indeed portable, and I will add the hint that "C clamp looking thing" is an adjustment for amount of travel in use.

Yes, I'd guessed that.

I also noticed that the bracket on the left in the middle picture, can be adjusted by two of the screws in the last photo and that the last photo also shows a "hook" that it appears could be rotated to clamp around something.

So my wild-ass guess is that this is some sort of attachment for a shaft - possibly some sort of "hammer drill/jackhammer" sort of thing breaking up a hard material like rock. But I'm sure there are lots of reasons why it's not exactly that! A ruler would be helpful, but I've said that before in this thread... I'm guessing 8" long or there about?
 
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Jay angler:

It is about 6" long. The "bracket" to which you refer is in fact a chisel-like cutter. It is not original; it appears someone made it from a piece of a file, so the original cutter may have been shaped a little differently. The "hook" does reach around something. You're thinking backwards...
 
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Looks kinda like a really fancy nut splitter
 
Jay Angler
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Jordan Holland wrote:Jay angler: You're thinking backwards...

Where have I heard that before - hmmm... this same thread and possibly a post you made but several articles ago? Do you have any idea how hard it is to get my old brain to reverse gears???

OK, so is it a really large hole saw?
 
Jordan Holland
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Tim Siemens wrote:Looks kinda like a really fancy nut splitter



It is heavy enough to smash them I guess.
 
Jordan Holland
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Jay Angler wrote:

Jordan Holland wrote:Jay angler: You're thinking backwards...

Where have I heard that before - hmmm... this same thread and possibly a post you made but several articles ago? Do you have any idea how hard it is to get my old brain to reverse gears???

OK, so is it a really large hole saw?



I noticed that too! Reversing gears keeps you flexible! Now you're close. You realized the square end is similar to that on an auger bit. It IS used on wood.
 
Jay Angler
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Jordon Holland wrote:

Now you're close. You realized the square end is similar to that on an auger bit. It IS used on wood.

So is it supposed to counter bore a hole so there's room for a washer and bolt to be inset in really large wood, like for piers?
 
Jordan Holland
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Jay Angler wrote:Jordon Holland wrote:

Now you're close. You realized the square end is similar to that on an auger bit. It IS used on wood.

So is it supposed to counter bore a hole so there's room for a washer and bolt to be inset in really large wood, like for piers?



That's a good guess, but not quite. Turn your guess inside out and maybe you'll have it.
 
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Maybe used to thread a wooden rod,..
to screw a broom head on or something.
 
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Deborah Matt wrote:No way! Im laughing at myself because I don’t think that’s what I was told this is or my feelings have really changed...IMHO this is a ridiculous thing to spend money on. Thanks for the info! I’ll pass this along to my grandson, he doesn’t think anything’s ridiculous yet and he’s still pretty spilly. I can’t think of a time I ever needed to carry around an empty water bottle or collapse the one I have.



I will say that Light my Fire is a really respectable Swedish brand and they don't screw around.  Pretty much everything of theirs I own goes in the "must pack" category.  They'e almost as good as Fiskars.  Another Scandanavian brand.
 
Jordan Holland
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Close Craig, but Jay's getting impatient, so I'll out with it: it's a round tenon cutter, and it's adjustable! It's really cool! It's one of those things they invented way back that showed the true ingenuity that comes from using tools everyday, and working to improve them to make them more versatile, faster, and easier to use. The beauty of this design is the geared, double rack and pinion system. The "hook" Jay referenced wraps around the tenon that has been cut thus far, in order to index the cutter at the same distance the whole time the jig spins. To cut different sized tenons, both the hook and cutter must be properly adjusted to the exact same distance from center. This would be time consuming and frustrating, so the gearing mechamism ties both the cutter and hook together, so they both automatically move the same distance at the same time. There appears to even be the remnants of a scale under the rust where it was marked where to adjust it for common sizes used. Well worth 6 bucks in my opinion, though it needs a little work. I suspect the replaced cutter needs work to get a smoother cut, but it was probably not meant to be too smooth, because a rough surface glues stronger than a smooth one, especially with natural glues they used back then.
20201021_181034.jpg
Adjustable tenon cutter
Adjustable tenon cutter
20201021_181257.jpg
Round tenon
Round tenon
 
Pearl Sutton
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I gave Craig an apple for "closest guess of a difficult object!" Well done Craig! You notice I didn't even guess... No freakin' clue what that was!!

Awesome thing you have there Jordan! I'd have bought it too! :D What a cool beast!!
 
Pearl Sutton
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Not real sure where this gets posted, but it IS a What is it?
Just not our typical one.
What IS it??
Apples for best answers, chosen arbitrarily by me.



 
thomas rubino
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This is the early development of Permie Person!  We don't know gender on this one.
An orange hero for Permies across the world!
Fighting poison sprays and corporate farming!
A true hero of organic farmers !
 
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BABY POWER!!!
 
Pearl Sutton
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I merged your stuff with the following thread. I hope that is okay by you.
 
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There are no markings, other than a "B" on the lid and gauge? It's nearly 36" tall, the main cylinder is 12" in diameter. There is a two level "basket" inside with a disc shaped like a drum symbol. (I believe there were two, I only have one.) Weighs aprox. 30-40lbs. Electric power-110V with 1800Watt heater element in the bottom, controlled by a 1-10 level switch/dial.  What is it???
What-is-it.jpg
Sitting in a Honda Fit
Sitting in a Honda Fit
Wha-is-it-lid.jpg
Capitol B on the lid and guage
Capitol B on the lid and guage
What-is-it-basket.jpg
two level basket with a missing symbol
two level basket with a missing symbol
 
Pearl Sutton
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Hey Glenn, welcome to Permies!
I moved your post to here, where lots of people will see it. The game here is the person who ID's it gets an apple...
Personally, having just taken jars out of my canner, I think that looks like an evil canner. I suspect I'm wrong. The wise folks here will figure it out soon.

 
Jay Angler
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Pearl Sutton wrote:

Personally, having just taken jars out of my canner, I think that looks like an evil canner.

Personally I agree with you, Pearl. I think it's designed to be more substantial than a typical home canner for people who wanted to can things like meat or low acid foods. If the metal "tower" with the black knob allows steam to escape and to control the pressure, that would add positively to my opinion.
 
Jordan Holland
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Pressure and temperature range are right for canning. I've never seen one like that, though. The double rack would be quite heavy to lift if fully loaded with liquid-filled jars. The bottom layer would be completely submerged for the top layer to have water touching it. Maybe just steam heated the contents? That would take forever to can. I don't understand the uninsulated copper; looks like it would lose a lot of heat, but then electricity used to be really cheap. It would make an excellent boiler for a still.
 
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William Bronson
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Yeah,  it looks like it might be a vintage dental autoclave,  could be worth a couple thosand to the right buyer :

https://picclick.com/Antique-Brass-and-Bronze-Dental-Medical-Autoclave-Sterilizer-183474682617.html
 
Glenn Harris
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I was able to find more info, it is indeed a vintage autoclave😎
Screenshot_20201113-114449_eBay.jpg
Ebay description
Ebay description
Screenshot_20201113-114533_eBay.jpg
Lid tag
Lid tag
Screenshot_20201113-114528_eBay.jpg
Ebay unit
Ebay unit
 
Pearl Sutton
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I gave an apple to William for identifying that thing, I have a secondary question now: What could a vintage autoclave be used for?
Personally, I'd be REALLY not inclined to bring it up to full pressure, if it fails, the results could be very bad, pressure failure explosions do a lot of damage and have killed people. But there have to be things it can be used for that don't involve pressuring it up fully.

Steam two whole chickens at one time?
 
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