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praise for pumpkins  RSS feed

 
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pumpkins are a great addition to the homestead garden. Nutritious and versatile they have been cultivated since ancient times. I'm beginning to see pumkins showing up in my garden and can't wait to harvest them for seeds, pumpkin pie and various recipe experiments.

http://www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/pumpkins/
 
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Location: Blue Ridge Mountains
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We were very fortunate to get pumpkins in early this year and harvested our first one yesterday. We also like the seeds and pies. This year however I am looking forward to putting some in the dryer and munching on some punkin jerky. 
 
Leah Sattler
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sounds good. I think that is a traditional native american way of eating it.  mmmmmmm. punkin pie mmmmmmmm
 
Charley Hoke
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Location: Blue Ridge Mountains
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Well the punkin jerky didn't work out quite as I had hoped. It wasn't ready when I went to bed last night and when I got up this morning they had completely dried out, punkin chips. Very tasty none the less, a mild nutty flavor. I think we will make more.
 
Leah Sattler
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grrr. The squash bugs are getting my pumpkins! I haven't been diligent enough with the dustbuster. It has been so hot my motivation is waning. 105 they are predicting today. I think I could live without August. signed - hot and miserable in OK.
 
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Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
bee chicken hugelkultur trees wofati woodworking
 
Leah Sattler
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The only problem is they eat my tomatoes along with the squash bugs! the chickens work great for me until the tomatoes are ripe. I had a "duh" moment recently concerning that. I needed some extras mater cages this this year and used some leftover welded wire fencing (1"x2" openings) around 6 roma plants. when the chickens came in they of course couldn't get to the ripening romas and only ate up my beef masters. I thought "of course! why didn't I think of that before!" I need to use welded wire as mater cages and just cut some holes to reach in to them. Then the chickys can come help me in july with the bugs and won't be able to get to my ripening maters. Next year I will have a plan! the garden gets better every year, experience really is the best teacher. I think that is why gardening has held my interest for so long. There is always something to learn or do better. ( I have been accused of a "short attention span" concerning hobbies. I get bored quick with some stuff.)
 
paul wheaton
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Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
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I used to put the chickens into the garden about two hours before dusk.  It seemed that they preferred to eat bugs over eating the garden.  It's as if they are bug deprived and starving for bugs and they don't want any veggies ... yet.  Then they go roost for the night.

Did you do something similar?

 
Leah Sattler
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I would just let mine in whenever they felt like it. (they could squeeze under the gate in the beginning of the year now I blocked it) . I could try the night thing. This year I had been anxiously awaiting the ripening of a great big tomato. I could see from the path that it was getting closer and closer! when I finally went to pick it I pulled it off and the side I couldn't see from the path was gone! An old hen was flying over the fence in the morning and eating my maters. I'm guessing I lost 25 tomatoes to her. Then the dogs ate her. Good dogs.
 
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Location: Western WA
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Pumpkins are the 'friendliest-looking' thing in the garden!  And it isn't just because we're used to seeing faces on them.

Re: chickens in the garden.  My brother just doesn't seem to get the concept of keeping the chickens out of the garden. He always leaves the gate open, and they go in and scratch all the mulch away from the plants.  That's why I ended up with so many green potatoes.

I keep wanting to tell him that he really does need to be smarter than a chicken...

Sue
 
Leah Sattler
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doesn't take much to outwit a chicken.
 
Susan Monroe
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I would dearly love to point that out to him, with the fact that he is FAILING.

Sue
 
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