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looking for Case Studies

 
Posts: 44
Location: Bucks County, Pennsylvania [zone 6]
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In Vol 1 of Edible Forest Gardens, there are several "case studies" of specific permaculture gardens. They have detailed info on layout, size, zone, age, etc... Really great and inspiring stuff.

I love it.

Does anyone know of any other resources with similar material? Even if it's not true permaculture, anything of similar flavor? Big bonus points for anything in or close to USDA zone 6.

I love looking at other people's layouts and plant choices. I've got some big changes coming for my land and the more inspiration I have to draw on, the better!
 
Bucks Brandon
Posts: 44
Location: Bucks County, Pennsylvania [zone 6]
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....so no bites?

hopeful bump.
 
Posts: 69
Location: Maricopa, AZ
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I'd like to see something in zone 9. Low desert would be great! I'm new to this and some examples with plants that would actually grow in my area would be very helpful.
 
steward
Posts: 7926
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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Zone 9 low desert, hmm.  Sounds like an ideal spot for the Indian goji berries.  The plants are native to Arizona/Mexican desert, so, obviously drought tolerant, and heat loving.  The Indians ate them cooked, raw, and dried.

Species Lycium exsertum, commonly called "wolfberries"
 
Becky Pinaz
Posts: 69
Location: Maricopa, AZ
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So.... if you were to design a guild with wolfberries in it, what else would you use? 
(While you're thinking about it, I'm going to look up Lycium exsertum.) 
 
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