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planting peach pits

 
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So having eaten my crate of peaches from the peach festival  I have tons of pits that I am thinking of planting. Do I have to do anything special to get them to germinate? I don't know if they will be true to variety but I would like to try a few.
 
Leah Sattler
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A little googling turned up my answer. It may take a while but they should germinate. I will give them a cold treatment as this article suggests to help speed things along.
http://www.michiganpeach.org/facts/pit.html
 
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Location: eastern washington
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leah, how did your experiment go? last fall we planted a bunch of plum and peach pits, aand figs we got from a seed trade from someone in France. ought to be fun seeing what they produce!
 
pollinator
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well just like the apples, most peaches are grafted..so i'm not sure what kind of luck you'll have..hybrids??? anyway..sure give it a try and see what you get..but because odd peach hybrids can be really thorny, don't put them near where children will be..we are talking 3" thorns !!!

i have a couple that died at the grafts and they grew back horribly thorny..i'm going to have the tractor pull them out this spring.
 
pollinator
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Location: Oakland, CA
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Even if the saplings end up looking too thorny, I bet any hybrid vigor in the rootstock & the opportunity to see how well peaches do in so many locations will be good for whatever scion you decide to graft on later
 
pollinator
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Location: Upstate SC
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Brenda, your peaches that died back to the graft and came back thorny were likely grafted onto plum rootstock.  Peaches aren't thorny, but some plums certainly are.  Around here I have a number of peach trees that grew up from discarded pits.  Most of them have good to decent fruit, but an occasional self-sown tree will produce fruit that doesn't ripen well or isn't sweet when ripe.
 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
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basjoos, yeah that is what i figured too..probably just the stock..but i'm thinking that they will have to go..they are very attractive to the rabbits..and don't bear..so they will be moving on..

i have ordered 2 new peach trees to replace them this year anyway..won't put in the same spot though..not sure if the soil would work after having peaches there before...so they'll go in a new spot

i've never tried planting peach pits..i think  i might give that a try sometime though myself
 
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Location: Eugene, OR
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If they don't produce all that well, you can always graft. Besides, you might discover the Sattler Peach 
 
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There are peach trees that grow true from seeds and are really disease resistant. Look them up, you will probably find them.
 
pollinator
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Location: South West France
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Pêche de vigne might be what you're thinking about Plankl ?

All the peach trees we have here are Pêche de vigne grown from stones thrown from the terrace into the compost heap. I transplant them if they look like healthy specimens.



The peaches are small but really delicious and the flesh comes away easily from the stone. The only problem I've found is that they do need pruning as the branches tend to crack under the weight of the fruit.

 
Aljaz Plankl
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Yea, it's probably the same - we call them vineyard peaches. They are very popular here and really the best one if you ask me. The taste is just awesome.
Branches crack huh? Natural pruning?
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