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Yellow spots on Mediterranean herb leaves ?

 
Steven Baxter
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I have this strip of dirt, oregano, sage, rosemary, mint, and thyme are all planted there. On all of the plants there are yellow spots. Some leaves are almost completely yellow from so many spots. I have no idea what it is.
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Location: Central Missouri
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Hmmm.  Doesn't look like a nutrient deficiency, as its affecting leaves of all ages.  I have not looked up these plants, but I would not think a disease would attack such a variety of plants.  That leaves something environmental: Any chemicals sprayed nearby, recently?  Sprinkled wood ashes? Acid rain in your area?  Spraying water on them on sunny days? (I've heard that the rain drops form little magnifying lenses and can burn leaves, but I've never seen it happen).
 
Steven Baxter
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Ya, I am not really sure. I dont think it is nutrient deficiency either. No chemicals that I know of. It seems to effect only the edible herbs in that are, does not effect ornamentals.
 
                        
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I have the exact same problems. Lots of yellow spots on the edible herbs (sage, rosemary, thym, mint…) and none on any of the other plants nearby. I actually threw out a whole patch of herbs last week, removed the top layer of the soil, added a new layer and replanted new herbs. A week after, the new herbs have the same spots. I'd love to know what it could be...
 
joe pacelli
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Could it be the early stages of septoria?
 
Dan Wallace
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Could be fungal but then again, I think most things are. I live a mile from the ocean so have damp mornings and evenings that cause several strange fungal disorders in my plants. Curly leaves, weird lesions, etc
 
                        
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Thanks for your replies. I actually found some "bugs" on the newly planted herbs this morning (see photos attached). Any idea of what it can be (and how to get rid of it?)
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Willy Kerlang
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Just a note about the drops of water acting as magnifying lenses--I've heard that many times before as well, but I've also heard it's a myth.  It was pointed out to me that if this was the case, plant life in general would have had a very hard time evolving on Earth, given how often the sun comes out after it rains. 
 
Steven Baxter
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joe pacelli wrote:
Could it be the early stages of septoria?


It has been more than 1 year and the yellow spots have not changed at all in to anything other than yellow spots. So I do not think it is septoria.

Zertie where do you live? Maybe it could be a climate/location issue. *shrug*
 
Nathalie Poulin
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I have no idea what they are, but maybe you could plant some things that would attract lots of predator insects? Maybe host a bat box? A frog pond, or at least some stones that frogs/lizards would be attracted to warm themselves on.
 
                        
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Thank you for your answers
A friend just took a look at them and said they're thrips - which seems to fit as some of them are now black and when I shake the plants they "fly" off (but come back!)
P.S. I live in Luxembourg
 
                    
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Hello, I think I have the same same problem.

I've got yellow spots on rosemary, oregano, mint and sage. Young leaves on sage seem to have less/no spots. The plot have not got much light though. All other plants are fine though. Definitely no overwatering. There was, in the summer, some red spiders (5mm) hanging above the plants - but no more spiders now in the winter (and I uprooted a few plants that had some spider web at the root).

Is the plant still edible?
What can I do to cure it?

(sorry I am quite clueless)
Many thanks!
 
Sergio Santoro
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Location: Nicoya, Costa Rica
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I have the same problem on coriander, lettuce, mint, green beans, radish and beets. So, is thrips the final answer?
I'm just posting here so I get the followup for every answer. Sorry I'm not the one with the answer.
 
lucy palmer
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This should help.

The leaves are stippled yellow by Spider Mites
Spider mites are tiny spider-like pests about the size of a grain of black pepper. They may be red, black, brown, or yellowish-white. Mites feed by sucking plant juices, removing chlorophyll and injecting toxins which cause small white dots on the leaves, discoloring and distorting them. Foliage of mite infested plants becomes stippled, yellow, and dry, and sometimes fine webbing is visible.

Spray plants with a forceful spray of water every other day for 3 days, to knock the mites from the leaves. If they persist, spray them with a natural insecticide such as an insecticidal soap or neem product according to instructions on its label.
For more information see the file on Controlling Mites

Identification
Culinary and aromatic herbs show signs of stress once they are infested with spider mites. Leaves begin to show discoloration and curling. Yellow and brown dots appear on otherwise healthy stock. The insects leave thread-like webs on the underside of leaves and stems of the plants. If you suspect a spider mite infestation, place a white piece of paper under several leaves and shake the leaves vigorously. If there is a proliferation of mites, they will fall to the paper and you will see movement.

Eradication
Once an infestation of spider mites is confirmed, you have many choices to rid your herb garden of the pest. Miticides are synthetic insecticides that kill on direct contact. While immediately effective, miticides are expensive and must be reapplied every five days. For a less toxic solution, choose rubbing alcohol or household detergent and mix it with water and spray it directly on the plant stem and underside of the leaves.

Mitigation
You can prevent spider mites from colonizing your herbs with a few best practices, known as integrated pest management. Keep clippings and weeds away from the soil surrounding your herbs. Select only the strongest stock and seed from the most reputable companies. Pinch or hand-pick any unwanted insects you see on the plant. Have a good plot plan and exercise crop rotation, pruning and removal of sick or infested plants. Blast spider mites out of your herb garden with a high-pressure stream of water once you see them on your plants.

Predation
There is a biological solution available for the organic gardener who prefers a more natural approach. Predatory mites eat other mites. Order phytoseiulus persimilis, metaseiulus occidentalis or phytoseiulus longpipes from mail-order nursery warehouses and these mites will not bother the plants. Instead, they just eat other mites. Many predatory mites are actually cannibalistic and will eat their own kind once all other food sources are gone.


Read more: Spider Mites on Herbs | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/info_8169819_spider-mites-herbs.html#ixzz1ssxREZfu
 
Kimber Epper
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those bugs are leafhoppers, but where was i in 2011 hehe
 
Tim Wells
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Location: Essex, England, 51 deg
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ya leafhoppers on sage, had exact same problem, they like spidermite also suck sap and cause discolouration of leaf, I prune my sage hard (50%) or even more like right back to 6 inches since its 3 year's old and has a big root system, this removes most the leaf hoppers and then the plant comes back quick and the leafhopper take a year to catch up, but they're almost never gone, but this way you get enough clean sage for culinary use. I use the manky sage to make a tea i cool and use as a hair rinse (its a natural accumulative hair dye, and very staining)
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