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The Great American Farm Tour: World Wide Premier FREE online viewing (48 Hours Only)  RSS feed

 
master steward
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Justin Rhodes and his family recently completed their Great American Farm Tour.  The film they have created documents their journey, the people they met along the way and so many awesome farms and families.  The documentary will be released for worldwide viewing in a matter of days and it's FREE! 

Sign up here to see the entire film: Great American Farm Tour Documentary FREE viewing

Here's an introductory video about their experience:


The full documentary follows Justin and his family of six as they travel in a school bus that they modified themselves. You'll get to see all of the following parts of their adventure as well as so much more.

Together, as a family they:

Turn an old school bus into a fabulous home on wheels.  
Close down their farm (including ALL their animals).  
Explore the Greatest Farms in ALL 50 states (Alaska and Hawaii too :)  
Meet regular folks who are doing extraordinary things.  
Uncovers the unimaginable beauty of farms and natural landscapes 
Laugh along with the unique humor from their children and their hosts.  
Discover THE Greatest Farm in America (the answer might surprise you ;)    
Premiere Planned to Begin APRIL 14th, 2018


PLUS! If you sign up NOW they will email you exclusive previews NOT available to the public as well as other goodies specifically for their audience.   

Did I mention that our very own Paul Wheaton is also featured in the documentary.  I bet you can't guess what he's talking about in the film. 

Click here to sign up now:  The Great American Farm Tour Documentary Page

 
Craig Dobbson
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Now's the time folks.  It's FREE  all weekend.   Get it now for free or but it later.



 
gardener
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Thanks for posting this Craig. Cool video.
John S
PDX OR
 
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I'm watching the video now. 
I was confused at first, because it's only a 5 minute trailer video ..... but, there's a signup link on the original post, that takes you directly to the nearly 2 hour documentary.  I've just started, and I am already excited.  It was amazing to keep up with the journey through youtube, and it has created much more desire for the final product.  I can't believe that this is free.

Only two days.  Grab it while it's hot!
 
William Wallace
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Even though he says Josiah is the sensitive one, I think it is Justin from his eyes as he walked away from the cow.
 
William Wallace
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Voting for another edit of GAFT.  For this director's cut, can we get all of the footage of Mister Brown running around every farm?  All of your family is great, but he is amazing to watch!
 
pollinator
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Watched it last night.  It was good, but some things were sort of a tortuous teaser!  

Highlights, and possibly SPOILERS depending on your sensibilities:

Paul W and Joel Salatin each fit what is possibly the most information into the smallest possible interview time.  Each were really good, and show what effective communicators both dudes can be, but left me wanting more, more, more.

The same sort of issue with Mark Shephard's brief screen time.

Overall, I think the most fun thing about the documentary is how it shows that there are soooooo many ways to accomplish a goal.  Which in farming is amazing for many reasons, but also because conventional thinking tends to tell us there is only one way. 

I loved seeing different people's solutions to the same issues.  At least a half dozen varieties of small animal "tractors" and ways to move them around. Many different ways of gardening and managing fencing issues. Something really strange going on in Alaska (the biggest strawberries I've ever seen - is that because of the extended day-length...?). The running of the sheep. I'll say no more.

A fun watch, worthwhile, and possibly only available another 24 hours for free (at least that's what is being implied).  Great fun.
 
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It was interesting, but I have to say I'm grateful I didn't have to pay to see it.

The cinematography and music was beautiful, but everything was skimmed by *so fast* as to leave me wondering why we saw it in the first place [a necessary evil of the length of course.]

I am wondering if the highest use of this is as a gift to friends/family to open their minds to what's possible and send them searching deeper.

*********

I also got a chuckle out of Curtis Stone in the flash-through segment without an interview. Wonder if that's because he's not in the US.
 
Kim Goodwin
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Kyrt Ryder wrote:The cinematography and music was beautiful, but everything was skimmed by *so fast* as to leave me wondering why we saw it in the first place [a necessary evil of the length of course.]



My husband felt the same way.  I watched a couple of the bonus features that came with subscribing to see the film, and the Paradise Farm one was good because it showed a lot of detail that obviously needed to be cut from the film because of time constraints.

Kyrt, when I was watching the film, I thought of you and your pig-garden-planting methods.  There seemed to be a couple families in the SE of the US who used at least somewhat similar methods.  Is it regional?  I was surprised by the number of the farms that had pigs, too.  In the west, in my experience, goats, cattle and sheep are more popular for the medium to large livestock. 

I also noticed that, remarkably, in the SE, the pigs didn't make the land look like one big mudhole.  Maybe that's why I didn't meet many pig farmers in Western Oregon?  The one I knew who did it on oak hillside had the tidiest setup.  But others, even careful people, could easily end up with a really slippery, smelly, anaerobic mess.  It's amazing how different soils and regions are across the US.

I enjoyed seeing how people do things differently across the country.  Even though it was akin to speed dating. 
 
Kyrt Ryder
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Speed Dating does seem like an excellent way to put it. I hope the commercial release will come with a sheet that identifies all the sites visited in order so purchasers will have an easy time looking the individuals up for further research.

Kim Goodwin wrote:Pigs


It's less a regional soil thing than it is a management thing. Pigs can be rotated effectively in regions with an excess of 60 inches of rain per year, the key is moving them swiftly enough that they don't damage the soil structure. In the dead of winter that also means you don't leave them long enough to do a whole lot of rooting because there isn't enough active life to bounce back afterwards.

Now, the details of a region will dictate the necessary pace of the rotation at different times of year. In our typical seasonal PNW drought I can easily leave the pigs in one spot for a week to fertilize the hard dry soil while I throw scraps into their enclosure that feed them and the soil, whereas in our soggy winter they absolutely do not stay in one place more than three days maximum, usually one.

The one complication is farrowing, when she gives birth those babies aren't very good at following for a few days but that's a level of detail I won't go into here on this thread.
 
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I've been trying for several hours to sign up to watch the video, but it gets stuck after I submit my email ("submitting" window never completes).  Any ideas?
 
Always look on the bright side of life. At least this ad is really tiny:
Binge on 17 Seasons of Permaculture Design Monkeys!
http://permaculture-design-course.com
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