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Wolves

 
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Location: Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada
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I completely love wolves. They are the greatest animal ever! I can't believe people think they're vicious killers. Wolves are featured at the bad guy a quite a few children's books, for example, Little red riding hood, The three little pigs. People are so mean when talking about wolves.
 
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The stories you mentioned are from the middle ages in Europe, designed to frighten children into wanting to be shut in at night.

Wolves have indeed been looked upon and still are looked upon by many folks as dangerous creatures.
Cattle men don't look at wolf attacks on their cattle as nature playing out, they look at it as wolves taking profits out of their pockets.
Those places in Europe that still have wolves feel the same as in the olden days.
Alaskans look at wolves as capable of killing children and livestock.

Sadly, those POV are the norm.

Wolves are wild creatures and they have and deserve to have their place in nature as the creator intended. It is humans who need to change more so than the wolf or grizzly or puma.
 
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I've always seen wolves as majestic creatures. I have also never lived within their range, so danger has never seemed real to me. I've spent time in bear country. Use caution. Don't piss 'em off. View from afar! It seems like it would translate well.

I have married into the name Hardesty. Old English translation: Strong Wolf's Path. Coolness.

 
Bryant RedHawk
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I used to have wolf friends, they are in the spirit world now because of old age.
My wife's spirit animal and native name are the same, Wolf mother.

Wolves are part of our world, we should respect them as much as we do the Grizzly bear and the Mountain Lion (puma).

I have not seen a wolf attack a human, but then I do not live where the snow people live, it is possible that hunger could cause such an event.
Humans are the intruders, not the wolves, they were here long before two legs walked here, this is their world too.

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Don't quite see how this relates to chickens, or permaculture.

That said, wolves have a place in nature.  The problem with wolves is that politics has become the controlling paradigm in discussions about them rather than honest debate over biology, ecology, and science in general.  

Much of the pro-wolf side is also virulently anti-hunting and are using wolves in part to drive out hunting by people.  And has led to things like introducing wolf breeds that are quite different from what had historically been present in some areas.  It has also led to the absurd level of proof required before a farmer can get reimbursed for wolf kills of livestock.  

The anti-wolf side (generally speaking, not specifically on this forum - and, FTR, I'm more sympathetic to the anti-wolf side) has it's own honesty issues too, with over exaggerating the impacts on livestock and wild ungulates.

Personally I'd be fine with bringing back wolves, but only if they closely match the characteristics of the extirpated breeds, had a reasonable policy for livestock depredation, and used proper perdator management (not just for wolves, but also cougar, bears, etc) to maintain healthy game animal populations.
 
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