• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies living kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • raven ranson
  • paul wheaton
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Julia Winter
stewards:
  • Burra Maluca
  • Devaka Cooray
  • Bill Erickson
garden masters:
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Bryant RedHawk
  • Mike Jay
gardeners:
  • Joseph Lofthouse
  • Dan Boone
  • Daron Williams

WHAT IS IT? Moss Looking Plant - Taste Sweet and Piney  RSS feed

 
                                            
Posts: 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator





This plant grows in my back yard. My wife and I are wondering what it is. I tasted it and it is really sweet and somewhat piney. It reminds me of club moss to a degree, but I don't know what it is.

Location: Southern Gulf Coast TX USA


THANKS!
 
Posts: 25
Location: Gardner, MA
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
My first instinct since you said it tastes sweet is dill.

It doesn't seem to be fennel because although I don't know if young fennel is sweeter, piney isn't something I think of with fennel. Edit: I just went in the kitchen and smelled a container we have a dried fennel, and there are some notes in it that could be piney.  I don't think I've ever smelled fresh fennel, so there may be a noticeable difference.  I also don't see the center section at ground level more typically seen with what fennel pictures I'm familiar with.  Also, the branching seems to be consistent to the ground, where fennel has a bit of a stalk.  Again, could be too young to tell for that.

I saw another site looking for an ID on a similar looking plant, and another guess was young asparagus, again, not really sweet I don't think even when young although it definitely can be earthy.

It also could be dog fennel from what I searched, but that doesn't taste sweet when mature.
This site discusses when it's good for kitchen use if in fact it is dog fennel: Herbs from Distant Lands 

That's all I have to suggest after doing a brief image match search.
 
                                            
Posts: 2
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I posted on another forum too, and found the same answer. You are correct, it is Eupatorium capillifolium, commonly known as "Dog Fennel".

I agree, it does look a lot like asparagus.

It taste awesome, and thought it would make a great tea. Thank you for your reply, maybe it is safe to cook with, but there are compounds that are dangerous in this species.
Glad I checked it out a little bit before just eating it...

Wikipedia Entry
Visual Confirmation from University of Florida

Information about the liver toxic chemicals found in this genus: pyrrolizidine

Not recommended for consumption.
 
Lily Hope
Posts: 25
Location: Gardner, MA
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Norffman Tinkersbottom wrote:{snip}Not recommended for consumption.

Thanks for the follow up.  I tend to be the same about not eating things until certain.  We have a couple of berries we haven't ID'd here yet, one of which my hubby sampled last year before I had a chance to say, "Are you nuts?"
 
gardener
Posts: 1620
Location: USDA Zone 8a
259
bee dog food preservation greening the desert hunting cooking purity trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have what looks like that growing here in the Texas Hill Country.  This is the first time I can remember seeing it.  I have been waiting for it to bloom.  My thoughts is that it is Wild Fennel:

http://www.eattheweeds.com/wild-fennel-foeniculum-vulgare/

"As roots have been  mentioned Wild Fennel is not the fennel you buy seasonally in the grocery store.  Cultivated fennel has a large, edible bulb and nearly flavorless greens. Wild Fennel does not produce a bulb but has flavorful greens and seeds. If you like the flavor of sweet licorice you will like fennel. Preparation is easy: To cook the young fronds bring a large pot of water to roiling, boil the fronds for 10 minutes or so, drain, use whole or minced. You can also save the cooking liquid for flavoring."

" You should know there is a distant relative to Wild Fennel that is deadly, the Poison Hemlock. Don’t get them mixed up. Wild Fennel has a very strong licorice aroma. Poison hemlock does not. Also Poison Hemlock has large leaves and the veins on the leaf terminate between the teeth. Wild Fennel leaves are much smaller and the veins do not terminate between the teeth."

I am not adventurous enough to try tasting it.  I am leaving it for the butterflies.

Then again it might be this:

https://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=HEAM

 
Posts: 86
7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Im not sure about all the flora of Texas, but there are a few annual flowers that have the same growing and or leaf structure. Of course adult size, bloom size, bloom color and bloom structure are all factors for ID. Check out the German chamomile plant or nigella sativa, aka black seed.
 
Doody calls. I would really rather that it didn't. Comfort me wise and sterile tiny ad:
Binge on 17 Seasons of Permaculture Design Monkeys!
http://permaculture-design-course.com
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!