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Removing cockroaches from a kitchen  RSS feed

 
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The cockroaches are quite big and fly around the kitchen sometimes. I've mixed up some borax with sugar and placed it along their usually pathway, but to no avail. It's a large shared kitchen which is difficult to keep very clean all the time as we all work outside. It gets a general clean everyday and is cleaned thoroughly once a week. They hide up in the ceiling so they're difficult to get to. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
 
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I have always used boric acid.  Put it where it is out of reach of little hands and pets.

If the infestation is large it might take putting it in lots of places, not just the kitchen, especially sources of water.
 
Mathew Davies
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Anne Miller wrote:I have always used boric acid.  Put it where it is out of reach of little hands and pets.

If the infestation is large it might take putting it in lots of places, not just the kitchen, especially sources of water.



I've only put it in one corner next to the sink, I'll try some different places too. Do you usually mix it with anything else to lure them?
 
pollinator
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While my experiences have dealt with ones that don't fly much, I find that concentrating on their water sources is the single best approach to eliminating them.

Honestly, they eat almost anything, but they don't have a work-around for lack of water. I would look to make sure there aren't any leaks in the ceiling or around any plumbing, and I would ensure that fixtures were as tight as possible. Even a leak that drips into the sink will provide them with water.

If you have a dehumidifier, you could try keeping the kitchen and area to under forty percent humidity.

Has anyone here, I wonder, tried mixing borax and diatomaceous earth? I think it at least possible that the latter will increase the efficacy of the former when used in conjunction.

Since my experience, I keep everything that food pests can get into in airtight packages, at least ziploc bags, but preferably glass containers with sealed, screw-top or swing-top lids. Granted, this helps more with things like moths and weevils, but making it harder for the cockroaches by whatever means necessary is the general rule-of-thumb.

I have often wondered if fowl will eat cockroaches. I mean, imagine a covey of kitchen quail patrolling the room, eating anything that dares cross an open space.

In any case, let us know how it goes, Matthew, and good luck.

-CK
 
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They can't see in the red light spectrum. So you can use a red light to spot them at night as they crawl around, and squish them...
 
Anne Miller
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Michael, I have never mixed it with anything.  It is usually granular like salt.  


Chris Kott wrote: Has anyone here, I wonder, tried mixing borax and diatomaceous earth? I think it at least possible that the latter will increase the efficacy of the former when used in conjunction.



The diatomaceous earth that Cris mentioned might be your best bet.  I have not used it as I have never found food grade except online and have never gotten around to buying it.  It is probably very effective by itself.

Be sure not to get it damp or wet as it loses it effectiveness.  Food grades is safe for kitchens, children and pets.

https://richsoil.com/diatomaceous-earth.jsp



Chris Kott wrote:  I find that concentrating on their water sources is the single best approach to eliminating them.

Honestly, they eat almost anything, but they don't have a work-around for lack of water. I would look to make sure there aren't any leaks in the ceiling or around any plumbing, and I would ensure that fixtures were as tight as possible. Even a leak that drips into the sink will provide them with water.

If you have a dehumidifier, you could try keeping the kitchen and area to under forty percent humidity.



Great advice.

Since my experience, I keep everything that food pests can get into in airtight packages, at least ziploc bags, but preferably glass containers with sealed, screw-top or swing-top lids. Granted, this helps more with things like moths and weevils, but making it harder for the cockroaches by whatever means necessary is the general rule-of-thumb.



Getting rid of food sources and access to grease will help.


I have often wondered if fowl will eat cockroaches. I mean, imagine a covey of kitchen quail patrolling the room, eating anything that dares cross an open space.  



Brilliant!

-CK
 
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we mixed it with bacon grease and it seemed to work
 
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I had this problem.
Fixed all leaks.
Cleaned up and secured food.

Filled the walls with borox.
Removed all cabinetry.
Open shelves only.
I might have ripped out the ceiling if I had had your problem, but my ceiling wad already gone...
This worked,haven't seen any in a long time.

So remove food or ruin all food water and shelter.

I think snakes probably would be less messy than birds....
 
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Old thread, but I have to add geckos. They make nice pets and seem to love cockroaches.
 
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Food grade Diatomaceous earth works. Spray powder along seams of walls, around/under appliances, sink. It is the best, easiest way to eliminate roaches.
 
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Start cleaning with a cordless blower instead of a vacuum cleaner, or in addition to a vacuum cleaner. When I did this at a friend's place, we virtually eliminated silverfish. I'm pretty sure it's because the blower finds every minute food particle and sends it out of the house. This house had lots of pet hair and pet dander along with wasted food. The blower gets rid of that. I'm not sure where silverfish lay their eggs. Perhaps the blowing is discharging them as well.

Chris mentioned water sources. We have cold well water here in Canada and quite often, the incoming cold line will produce enough condensation to supply many creatures including rodents, with all the water they need. So, insulate those pipes.
 
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