• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Modular / Kit Homes  RSS feed

 
Posts: 37
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Anyone have opinions on / recommendations for kit house / modular house, preferably from a company in the southeast? What are the options? I know there is steel, there are SIPs, I suppose there must also be wood frame.

I did get a link to https://jamaicacottageshop.com/ in another thread.

The idea is something that will go up fast, for someone with moderate building experience.
 
Posts: 1
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have done some research on Kodiak steel homes...seem very nice with good support
 
Posts: 36
Location: New Jersey (for now!)
13
homestead hugelkultur tiny house urban wofati woodworking
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Andrea and everyone,

First of all . . . full disclosure . . . I am TOTALLY biased, but I think you should check out https://CruxHomes.com (which is my website).



I hope you're interested in buying a CruxHome kit from me, but if you're not, there are other options and I would be happy to give you what guidance I can.  Please, please, please let me know if you have any questions.

Cheers!
CJ







 
pollinator
Posts: 1422
Location: USDA Zone 8a
171
bee dog food preservation greening the desert hunting cooking purity trees
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We bought ours from Tuff shed:

https://www.tuffshed.com/gallery/


 
Andrea Wisner
Posts: 37
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This is great input. Thanks.

I also have website of another company, although I have no opinions on them, pro or con: http://greenterrahomes.com/.

I would like to hear opinions on the options, if anyone is aware.
 
Andrea Wisner
Posts: 37
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Oh here's another one, "netzero," super-insulated SIPs and super-expensive: https://www.brightbuilthome.com/

I'm not really sure it counts as a kit home. I think you have to use their company to place it on-site. Maybe you could diy the finishing out.
 
Anne Miller
pollinator
Posts: 1422
Location: USDA Zone 8a
171
bee dog food preservation greening the desert hunting cooking purity trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Andrea, if you DIY the interior you can add your own super insulation and go with what ever method you want. 

 
pollinator
Posts: 1876
262
books cat chicken duck rabbit transportation trees woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
My wife and I are looking at some modular homes and found several very nice ones.

Here in Maine they have to be built to Northern standards so they are fairly good. I say "fairly" because my own home is super insulated and they do not quite meet that, but are pretty good for off-the-shelf.

As for cost? I am not sure. I was once told that a person could build the same exact home stick built for a lot less than a modular, but I am not sure. I know after 23 years of building my current home, I am tired of carpentry. Some are really nice looking, but what are they like 10 years from now? I currently do not have enough information to answer that question.

Now, my parents built a pre-made home and had some issues with it. The first issue was actually getting here, the truck was in an accident and their first house was demolished along about a mile of highway. The second issue was the lack of engineering. Their home is huge (I remember the square footage because it is exactly a mile in size, 5,280 sq ft). Because their house is barn shape, their 2 story barn shape garage being perpendicular to the main part of the home, the roofline angles were crazy with multi-angles. The company just said, "we can't figure it out, you make the two buildings match", despite having all the computers to do so. Finally, the concrete guy doing the foundation sucked, and so the floor was so out of level that the panels had to be ripped apart and then set back together after parts were cut. This all lengthened the build time a lot.

 
Posts: 4
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

I have been researching this topic from a perspective of efficiency and total life-cycle energy expenditure (mine and dead dinosaurs).  I'm leaning strongly toward MGO SIP construction for it's simplicity, flexibility and durability.  MGO SIPs are virtually waterproof, rot-proof, insect proof and can be ordered as a 'kit house' with almost everything included to rise from a foundation to weather-tight on a single truck load.  Why this, because Carpenter bees and termites have decimated my original site-sourced cabin in only a few years.  You can investigate this option at:  (I have no affiliation)

https://innovaecobuildingsystem.com/

They are located in Miami Florida, ship mainly to Central and South America, are aligned to supplying small, highly efficient housing to third-world countries and disaster areas.  The buildings are made of panels and can be assembled with minimal tools by 4 people in only a few days.  (though some kind of crane to place roof panels would sure help). 

This is the least expensive (but not cheep), most efficient, fastest self-build option I've found.  Both panel faces are almost impervious to water and don't require outside siding or interior drywall.  The roof doesn't even require shingles or cladding.  The company offers a water-based (really gooey) paint that can be used to finish the outside and roof, like what is used on mobile-home roofs or new commercial buildings.  As much as I'm against using petrochemicals, this system should last 100 years (though that is still unproven) with minimal inputs for heating or cooling.  That said, ain't nothing "natural" about it.

Sorry, for all the 'qualifiers', think I'll shut-up now
 
Posts: 12
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hey everyone,

I just wanted to let you know that I work for a company that sells manufactured homes.  (Single wides, double wides, and modulars).  If any of you are considering the purchase of a factory built home and you have any questions,  feel free to contact me.   I am not looking to make a sale here.  This is Permies.  We share information for free.  I am just offering to answer questions and share expertise.   FYI. ...several factories offer R40 and R50 as an option in the attic.  200-400 bucks.

Peace,
 
Posts: 83
7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Chris Carl wrote:
I have been researching this topic from a perspective of efficiency and total life-cycle energy expenditure (mine and dead dinosaurs).  I'm leaning strongly toward MGO SIP construction for it's simplicity, flexibility and durability.  MGO SIPs are virtually waterproof, rot-proof, insect proof and can be ordered as a 'kit house' with almost everything included to rise from a foundation to weather-tight on a single truck load.  Why this, because Carpenter bees and termites have decimated my original site-sourced cabin in only a few years.  You can investigate this option at:  (I have no affiliation)

https://innovaecobuildingsystem.com/

They are located in Miami Florida, ship mainly to Central and South America, are aligned to supplying small, highly efficient housing to third-world countries and disaster areas.  The buildings are made of panels and can be assembled with minimal tools by 4 people in only a few days.  (though some kind of crane to place roof panels would sure help). 

This is the least expensive (but not cheep), most efficient, fastest self-build option I've found.  Both panel faces are almost impervious to water and don't require outside siding or interior drywall.  The roof doesn't even require shingles or cladding.  The company offers a water-based (really gooey) paint that can be used to finish the outside and roof, like what is used on mobile-home roofs or new commercial buildings.  As much as I'm against using petrochemicals, this system should last 100 years (though that is still unproven) with minimal inputs for heating or cooling.  That said, ain't nothing "natural" about it.

Sorry, for all the 'qualifiers', think I'll shut-up now



Thank you for posting about SIPs - sounds very interesting!
 
Posts: 48
Location: Zone 4, SD
9
cat chicken dog goat homestead wood heat
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Another rather inexpensive (comparatively speaking) option is to get a pole barn kit so you have the roof, doors, windows and load-bearing support taken care of.  Opt out of their siding material and DYI with straw bale infill walls. 
 
Posts: 9
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
My wife and I are going with a 400sqft home kit from Shelter Kit
https://shelter-kit.com/our-buildings/

Its a traditional stick-build home (wooden 2x4s, etc.). They provide all the pre-cut lumber & fasteners & instructions, and ship it to your site.

You build it like IKEA furniture. Once its dried-in, you insulate the walls and finish it yourself.

For the size, its cheap! For eco-friendlness, pre-cut kits offer minimal waste, and tiny homes are eco-friendly anyway. We've had nothing but 100% positive experience with them.

We have longer-term plans to build a straw bale house, with clay-plaster floors and walls, but that's 5years out.



-Scott
 
When you have exhausted all possibilities, remember this: you haven't - Edison. Tiny ad:
New Job: Restoration Coordinator - Americorps
https://permies.com/t/87480/jobs-offered/experiences/Restoration-Coordinator-Americorps-Position
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!