I just dropped the price of
the permaculture playing cards
for a wee bit.

 

 

uses include:
- infecting brains with permaculture
- convincing folks that you are not crazy
- gift giving obligations
- stocking stuffer
- gambling distraction
- an hour or two of reading
- find the needle
- find the 26 hidden names

clickity-click-click

  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

canned stock  RSS feed

 
Leah Sattler
Posts: 2603
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I don't know how I ever got by without my own chicken stock waiting for use in the pantry! Before, whenever I wanted to use chicken stock for something, I started a chicken simmering in the morning so that I could have stock ready for an evening meal. Sometimes I would freeze extra but it wasn't nearly as useful or convenient as the quarts I have stocking my pantry now. Best of all I have natural chicken stock at my fingertips without added msg and with all the flavor and richness of homemade stock; not the bland, fat free, salt water that is all that is available from the store. mmmmmmmmm.
 
                                          
Posts: 8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I can't imagine cooking with canned stock or bouillon cubes.  A good homemade stock really makes a dish!

I have been using chicken feet in my white chicken stock and have gotten wonderful gelatinous stock.  This is perfect for aspics when one does not want to use a beef or veal based aspic.  Most Asian markets have them-and they are extremely cheap. They do take a little more work in that one must snip off the toe nails...but the resulting stock is worth it!

Here is my question for brown beef broth.  What sort of oil do you use when browning the bones in a roasting pan?  I hate vegetable oil/corn oil and would prefer to use olive oil ..but it is too expensive for that use! Also does anyone use another method to brown their bones - aside from oven roasting?
 
Joel Hollingsworth
pollinator
Posts: 2103
Location: Oakland, CA
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
new2castiron wrote:What sort of oil do you use when browning the bones in a roasting pan?


I tend to have rendered fat on hand from whatever other meat-cooking operation I've done recently.  I still throw away some of it, but it's great for browning.

Not only is it cheap, it has a higher smoke point than olive oil.
 
Leah Sattler
Posts: 2603
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I dont' brown mine. I dislike stock from roasted chicken. to me all the flavor is gone. to the point that everytime I have made stock from an already cooked bird I just threw it away.

I use whole chicken or good bony cheap parts, add ..salt, a bit of onion or onion powder if thats all I have, celery seed, allspice, peppercorns if I have them and a splash of vinegar. simmer simmer simmer.

I can't seem to get stock made from cooked bones to mound up on the spoon from the gelatin when cooled like this. it seems it has all been cooked out already 

 
Joel Hollingsworth
pollinator
Posts: 2103
Location: Oakland, CA
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It takes me about two days to make stock from a cooked carcass.

I pack the bones in tightly, add whatever else, press it down, and only add enough water to cover the bones.

I put in veggies, maybe lemon rinds, almost always some garlic, bay leaf...I wait to add salt until I use the stock: in case something spoils, it can be composted.

I get it up to a good boil, and simmer it a while, usually the time it takes to make dinner.  Then I let it cool on the stove, being careful not to disturb the lid and introduce bacteria.  Every 8 hours or so, when I remember, I simmer it some more.

On the second or third day, I empty the stock and replace the water, and start again.  Even the second go-round usually gels like you show.

I recently forgot one such pan of stock for about a week.  It didn't smell or look spoiled as I put it on the compost pile, but I didn't want to risk it.
 
Without subsidies, chem-ag food costs four times more than organic. Or this tiny ad:
Video of all the permaculture design course and appropriate technology course (about 177 hours)
https://permies.com/wiki/65386/paul-wheaton/digital-market/Video-PDC-ATC-hours-HD
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!