• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies living kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • raven ranson
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Julia Winter
garden masters:
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • thomas rubino
  • Bill Crim
  • Kim Goodwin
  • Joylynn Hardesty
gardeners:
  • Amit Enventres
  • Mike Jay
  • Dan Boone

Mushroom Slurry for Garden  RSS feed

 
Posts: 14
Location: NB, Canada
bee chicken forest garden
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm just breaking ground on a new garden plot and have seen mention of using a mushroom slurry on the new beds to inoculate them. I've done a search and haven't found any detailed descriptions of people's methods for making and using the slurry. I'd love to hear how you all make yours and apply it. Thanks in advance!
 
gardener
Posts: 4865
Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
557
books chicken dog duck fish forest garden fungi homestead hugelkultur hunting pig
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Gather wild mushrooms (or too far gone to be good ones from mushroom logs), fill blender add water and whirr up till the mushrooms are pulverized, If really thick, thin with more water and pour on soil in garden.

You can use store bought mushrooms, that's just an expense but if you can't get wild ones, they will work just fine.

Redhawk
 
Posts: 13
Location: Reno, NV
fungi trees
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I make the slurry as Bryant described it in plus I ad some woodash to increase pH. Lots of fungi love growing on burnt wood
 
Posts: 41
1
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi, so glad to see this question...but some  say that if you have a question, chances are others do too...when I saw this suggestion the other day, I wondered, and then hoped it would be this easy : ) 

I need to do this, thank you!  Also, can I use the wood ash from last winter's fires?  Or are you speaking of a special preparation that I have read about elsewhere?

Planting for the fall, it still seems so hot, but I need to do what I can for my garden, many eyes are judging the issue of gardens by my small plot : )  I have successfully made compost, and have a good mulch, aged bunny and clean cow pooh, saved and bought seeds...now, the energy to plant  : ) 

Thanks to all who post, I read about so many good farming practices here, and practical help, I am grateful  : )

Happy Fall : ) betty
 
Bryant RedHawk
gardener
Posts: 4865
Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
557
books chicken dog duck fish forest garden fungi homestead hugelkultur hunting pig
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
hau Beth, just about any wood ash will work well, things to keep in mind are 1) hardwood ash is what lye comes from, lye is a very basic (pH of 10 -14) item so if you have acidic soil and you want to keep it acidic, you would need to leach the ash first (run water through the ashes to remove the lye).
2) conifer ash is slightly acidic so the issue with hardwood ashes does not apply. 3) if your firewood is soft wood and hardwood, chances are it is fine to use, without any need to pre treat it.

Most fall garden seeds do fine when planted while it is still hot, they won't be at the fruiting stage for a while and the warmth gives the plant time to put on lots of leaves. Cabbages and beets are probably best if planted last. (we are getting ready to plant the fall garden at the end of August and first part of September.
 
I RELEASE YOU! (for now .... ) Feel free to peruse this tiny ad:
Rumpelstiltskin ain't got nothing on this
https://permies.com/wiki/92731/fiber-arts/Homegrown-Linen-transforming-flaxseed-fibre
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!