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invasive wild strawberry  RSS feed

 
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My garden walkways are overrun by the wild strawberries, similar to the ones on the picture below.
Does anyone know if there is a value of keeping them around, or will I be better off over-planting the walkways with bio-accumulators, such as clover?
wild-strawberry.jpg
[Thumbnail for wild-strawberry.jpg]
 
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Are the flowers on those strawberries white or pink?

The wild strawberries I have at my house are DELICIOUS. I purposefully transplant them under my trees and let them grow in my gardens. They bear fruit from June (if not May) through October. I love snacking on them--though I rarely get any because my kids eat as many as they can find!

If your berries are tasty, I'd keep them! Or, transplant them under fruit trees as an edible ground cover.
 
gardener
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Nicole Alderman wrote:Are the flowers on those strawberries white or pink?



Or are they yellow?

Reason I ask is because that looks a lot like the fruit of the mock strawberry to me.  It's more like a cinquefoil.  Here's an article about it: Mock Strawberry "Duchesnea indica"

And another article that talks about it's edibility, which it is, just not a showstopper like a real strawberry: Mock Strawberry : A Disdained Common Edible

And here is a picture that shows both the very seedy looking fruit, and also the yellow cinquefoil, or buttercup-like flower of the mock strawberry:



Let us know!  I love these little puzzles...
 
Nicole Alderman
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I didn't know about mock strawberry! Last year I stumbled upon the "lipstick strawberry" which is a cross between a strawberry and a cinquefoil (mock strawberries are cinquefoils, too!)

Here's a picture of the lipstick strawberry


I've read it spreads a lot, and flowers a lot, but doesn't make much fruit. It's used more as an ornamental ground cover than as an edible, though it is edible.

Here's some more info on "lipstick strawberries" and other strawberry-cinquefoil crosses. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fragaria_×_Comarum_hybrids
 
Tatyana Piven
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Looks like I have cinquefoil judging by yellow flowers and tastless berries. Well, good news is that I just found an endless supply of snack greens for my guinea pigs! Do we know the nutritional values, anyone? Thank you!
 
pollinator
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Nicole Alderman wrote:
I've read it spreads a lot, and flowers a lot, but doesn't make much fruit. It's used more as an ornamental ground cover than as an edible, though it is edible.



Thats the problem when people buy plants for you and they have no idea what it is either, I though it was just not getting pollinated. Thank you
 
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