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Peanut Permaculture

 
                                
Posts: 6
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I am planning on planting some peanuts this week, but plan to do it leaning more towards the Permaculture, versus the "traditional way". I am not experienced in the Permaculture way at all.

I searched the first 15 pages of the forums for the key word "peanut" and did not find anything so I hope I am not being redundant in this posting.

I live in central FL, and the area I plan to plant the peanuts is sandy, crappy soil, void of nutrients I would suspect. It is covered with a thin layer of foliage, mostly oak leaves.

According to the "one straw method" I would coat the ground in a 6" layer of compostables with holes for dirt in which I would plant the peanuts, Right?

Is this going to be the best method for me, or shall I change routes and try something else.

I have found that squash seems to be a good companion plant for Peanuts, so I will plant some squash as well.

Any tips are appreciated.

 
Scott Jackson
Posts: 37
Location: Córdoba, Argentina
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HI Andy -

How did your peanut test turn out? I have also wondered why there's so little talk about peanuts in most permaculture texts...

I just planted a few raw peanuts in small pots, and one of them just took root after about 4 days.

Looking forward to hearing from the group...

Scott
 
Denise Lehtinen
Posts: 102
Location: Tampa, Florida zone 9A
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Nice to see a post from another person in Central Florida.

And peanuts seem like an easy plant to combine with other plants because they are legumes and will contribute nitrogen to the system.

Maybe I'll mix them in with my sweet potatoes this summer.
 
Matt Smith
Posts: 181
Location: Central Ohio, Zone 6A - High water table, heavy clay.
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Also want to try peanuts this summer.

Named varieties are available, my soil here is clay so it might be nice to start with something that has been bred to do well in denser soils.
 
Jeffrey Hodgins
Posts: 166
Location: Yucatan Puebla Ontario BC
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Guanacaste nuts taste like a mild peanut and they grow on trees. Just a thought.
 
Matt Smith
Posts: 181
Location: Central Ohio, Zone 6A - High water table, heavy clay.
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Jeffrey Hodgins wrote:Guanacaste nuts taste like a mild peanut and they grow on trees. Just a thought.


Sounds tropical... and you're in Ontario? Link me please?
 
Denise Lehtinen
Posts: 102
Location: Tampa, Florida zone 9A
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Guanacast Tree (Enterolobium cyclocarpum) USDA Zones 10-12.

It is a tropical tree. And according to Wikipedia huge, too.
 
Denise Lehtinen
Posts: 102
Location: Tampa, Florida zone 9A
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The best numbers for Tampa is USDA zone 8-10 (or thereabouts).

Zone 8 means it will take a freeze. (Temps hitting briefly below 32F/0C.)
Zone 10 means it will take the summer heat.

And that isn't even taking into account some plants specifications with regard to humidity.
 
Jeffrey Hodgins
Posts: 166
Location: Yucatan Puebla Ontario BC
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True Guanacaste is tropical but I think t grows in Alabama Georgia and Florida. And yes they are huge the crown of my biggest tree is 100ft across, but they produce less shade than most treesUnder their canopy is a great place to start new trees or plants.
http://www.yucatanadventure.com.mx/yucatan-flora.htm On this site they call it Elephant ear tree.
 
Denise Lehtinen
Posts: 102
Location: Tampa, Florida zone 9A
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Southern Florida is zone 10, so I can easily believe that it would like it there.

In the other locations you mentioned it would need to be able to survive freezing temperatures (Tampa), and in places further north a once in a decade snow fall.

Does anyone know if it can do that?
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