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Plant id

 
Posts: 152
Location: Connecticut
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Looking for help to id two plants.  First appears to be a shrub.  The leaves are somewhat course.  The second is some flowering plant.  I have a small stand of them near my apple tree
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gardener
Posts: 1870
Location: Just northwest of Austin, TX
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Great pictures,  are these plants selfseeded or are they existing landscape/garden plants you're just unfamiliar with?  

That shrub in particular looks like something I see planted around here.  Unfortunately I don't know the name. I've been able to identify some local shrubs for myself by looking at invasive species lists.  Landscape shrubs that selfseed around ghe area quick make these lists.
 
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The first plant might be Siberian Pea Shrub:

http://tcpermaculture.com/site/2013/05/13/permaculture-plants-pea-trees/


 
Anne Miller
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The second might be a poinsettia:

http://aces.uiuc.edu/vista/html_pubs/point/point.htm


June:




December:


 
Casie Becker
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Location: Just northwest of Austin, TX
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I have pointsetta still alive .  I think it looks more like my monarda but I'm not finding any images of monarda with a redish top.

In these pictures,  see how the pointsetta has red stems. The monarda is solid green.

Other names for monarda include bergamot, bee balm, and horse mint.
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Anne Miller
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I was going by the leaf. It has been a long time since I saw a poinsettia.

You know more about plants than I do so it might be monarda or may be something in the Euphorbia family.  If it is a Euphorbia, it will have a milky sap where I don't think the monarda would.

What do you think about the Siberian Pea Shrub?
 
Casie Becker
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Mostly I'm just good at google. I won't really be confident that first plant is a monarda until I see the flower. It is just the closest match in my garden.

Those leaves do look like the ones on my legumous shrubs. The branching pattern matches the picture, also.  I've never seen one in person, so this is probably more your area than mine.
 
Aaron Festa
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Thanks everyone.  I agree the first shrub like plant looks like something in the pea family.  we mostly get black locust but I know it's not that.  The leaves are thick and almost fuzzy (almost mullein texture). Locust are thin and smooth.  (It's not something I planted). The third pic that's the plant at full maturity.  If I remember from last year.  It's gone by mid summer.  I like that it pops up so I'm hoping to identify.  
 
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The shrub looks like a snowberry ,symphiocarpos and the flower does resemble a monster. My 2 cents
 
Aaron Festa
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Snowberry seems like a great possibility.  Thank you.  The flower looking like a monster comment was that a mistype or being funny?
 
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Judging by what seem to be new forming leaves at the ends of twigs, the first looks more like a honeysuckle (opposite simple leaves) than a legume (pinnate compound leaves).
 
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