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Where to locate my next peach tree? Not quite pushing the zone.  RSS feed

 
gardener
Posts: 452
Location: Officially Zone 7b, according to personal obsevations I live in 7a, SW Tennessee
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I currently have an Elberta peach that I planted in 2014. It has yet to fruit, thanks to late freezing. I am in zone 7a, so I am not exactly pushing the zone here. The tree is just outside the drip line of an old oak 30 feet away. There is plenty of area down slope for the frosts and freezes to slide down to.

I plan to air layer a couple branches and am looking for recommendations of a better place to plant. I don't have the option of planting to the south of my home. I may be able to snuggle one tree up under the oak's canopy. Any other thoughts?
 
Posts: 35
Location: san diego ca
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planting something to keep it in shade in the winter and early spring could help so it doesnt break early if you get warm winter days  happends alot in southern california where i live

i dont know if that help where you live though
 
Joylynn Hardesty
gardener
Posts: 452
Location: Officially Zone 7b, according to personal obsevations I live in 7a, SW Tennessee
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Planting one in the shade is why I am considering snuggling it under the canopy of my neighbor's oak. Though I don't know if that will work in my climate either. I failed to notice if the oak tree had leafed out before that last freeze.
 
gardener
Posts: 1531
Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
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Oaks are about the last trees to leaf out.  For me they are well after the snow has melted.  I planted two peach and an apricot in the winter shade of some conifers.  Their shade held the snow for at least an extra week. 

I planted them last spring (bare root 4-8' tall) and the apricot (Westcot) did just fine, one peach died totally (Contender) and the other (Red Haven) died back nearly to the graft.  No flowers this year on the apricot, hopefully next year...

Can you make a man-made shade structure?  Pallets come to mind.
 
pollinator
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Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
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Maybe make/grow some shade for it?
Silverberry, the evergreen nitrogen fixing shrub, or a barrel at top and bottom cut out?
Paint it with white or reflective paint?

Buckets, barrels or tubes of water to moderate temperatures?

Maybe plant in a frost pocket?
I'm not sure peaches like wet feet, so rather than digging a hole maybe use a section of barrel only a foot above grade.
Add new sections of barrel as the tree grows.
That way your trunk is shaded.
As you go,berm all around it,all the way up to the outside edge,and plant alfalfa, comfrey, etc.
Now you have a peach tree volcano of earthen shade!
Maybe strait sides would be better,more of a doughnut of earthen shade.
Raised beds get warmer sooner in the spring, but that means it should buffer the trunk and roots.
Might make picking and pruning easier too.


 
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