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Missing pieces of Chicken Puzzle found

 
                      
Posts: 56
Location: MONTANA, Bozeman area; ZONE 4
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Below are excerpts from an intro to "Natural Farming" as systematized in Korea. This was put together as a response to the Western mechanization of agriculture happenig during the 1960's there.  The founder at that time was persecured, tortured, but now his system is used nation wide.

The major key for livestock keeping is the growing of positive microbes that are used to treat the stalls, pens, hay, sawdust etc.  These turn the whole process into a vastly simpler one.

They have systematized the whole process of chicken growing stage by stage, to teh extent where I have seen figures that one man can care for 5,000 chickens.  And farmers in S. Korea are said to be making six figure incomes.

Here is an overview of what this system will do for chicken raising.

http://janonglove.com/janongusa/intro03.html


Livestock barn with no pollution
There's no pollution from Natural Farming livestock barns. Natural Farming livestock barns and pens do not discharge any wastewater. When feces from livestock fall on the floor, it is quickly decomposed by powerful micro-organism activities. Concrete is not used on the barn floor. The floor is in direct contact with the soil which teems with micro-organisms. The floor consists of a mixture of rice straws, sawdust, and fresh soil. There is no need to clean or remove animal waste and feces from Natural Farming barns even after many years of use. They do not pile up; they are decomposed with little smell. Natural Farming barns do not smell. Natural resources, such as the sunlight, efficient air circulations and micro-organisms, are utilized to maintain the floor dry and fluffy. It is a common sight to see a Natural Farming barns or pens right next to a resident building.


No artificial heating
Natural Farming barns and pens do not need any artificial heating. Instead of using fossil fuel or electricity to provide heating, we help the livestock to develop the natural resistance against cold. Natural Farming chickens grow short, tough and dense hair whereas ordinary chickens have long, soft and sparse hair. In cold regions, the heat coming from fermentation of compost is utilized to maintain a comfortable temperature level in the barn.

Natural Feed made locally by Farmers
Natural Feed made locally by Farmers. Chickens are fed with whole brown rice grains and bamboo leaves immediately after hatching. Tough fiber-rich feed strengthens their intestines. Animals raised by Natural Farming methodology are healthy, strong and have little diseases.
 
Tyler Ludens
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Looks like the "deep litter method" or raising them on compost. 

 
                      
Posts: 56
Location: MONTANA, Bozeman area; ZONE 4
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You might say it is similar to the deep litter method.

There is no sanitizing, except by the micro-organisms, with which you innoculte the initial bedding.

You never change it, just add more when it vanishes thru time.

THey have other simple ways to make the farmers work much simpler, in feeding them one time per day,

in starting chicks off in such a way as to make strong intestines.
 
Jordan Lowery
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we use a similar system here with our chickens. i learned about it while researching a thing called beneficial indigenous micro-organisms. its basically a deep litter method on steroids, much more efficient at getting the poop to not being poop. the only thing is ours isnt on the ground so when i do clean it out( about twice a year) im just scooping out a thin top layer of decomposing poop with rice hulls/sticks/soil, and everything under it is rich dark compost.

the micro organisms keep the smell down to zero, absolutely NO smell at all. the great thing is the garden likes it just as much as the chicken coop does.
 
                      
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Location: MONTANA, Bozeman area; ZONE 4
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Yes, that is the same or similar, probably from the same source.  They popularize the use of "indigenous" micro-organisms, as being much more stable and vital.


"The following article is taken from Korean Natural Farming Handbook p.91 
to 105. 
1. Why indigenous?
Natural farming rejects foreign microorganisms. It also rejects 
microorganisms that are produced mechanically or artificially or refined 
simply to increase their market values. No other microorganism adapts 
with the same strength and effectiveness as indigenous microorganisms 
that have lived in the local area for a long time. Domestic farmers who 
are used to buying commercial microorganisms are amazed at the 
effectiveness of homemade indigenous microorganisms (IMO). The spread of 
IMOs and Fermented Plant Juice (FPJ) is giving a new vision for 
environment friendly agriculture in Asia. We can make microorganisms, 
widely considered to be one of the most important materials in 
sustainable agriculture, at home.


Microorganisms that are made in factories or greenhouses where 
temperature and moisture are kept constant are only effective in similar 
environments but NOT where the environment is different of subject to 
change. In the greenhouse there are no typhoons, droughts or floods, but 
farming has to deal with all kinds of unexpected environmental 
conditions. Korean Natural Farming suggests therefore that farmers grow 
and use local microorganisms at ambient temperatures. I firmly believe 
that there is no better alternative to using locally available IMO's on 
your fields."
 
                            
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Very fascinating! Thank you so much for sharing this. I'd love to learn more about the indigenous micro-organisms. Will be watching this thread closely for any who are willing to share details/expertise.
Thanks.
 
                      
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Location: MONTANA, Bozeman area; ZONE 4
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This is a video of a presentation by a lady from Hawaii who went to Korea to take their training.  It includes other things than just the IMO's.


HOW TO NEVER CLEAN THE CHICKEN FLOOR 

Minute 20; 

Minute 48-  example of throwing IMO dirt onto straw for bedding

CHICKEN FEED AND LAYING AREA  -  see the final 3 minutes

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bdNHEpMISmQ


 
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