• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies living kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • raven ranson
  • paul wheaton
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Julia Winter
stewards:
  • Burra Maluca
  • Devaka Cooray
  • Bill Erickson
garden masters:
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Bryant RedHawk
  • Mike Jay
gardeners:
  • Joseph Lofthouse
  • Dan Boone
  • Daron Williams

Disappointing peach tree saga. Any pointers for next year?  RSS feed

 
Posts: 161
Location: S. Ontario, Canada
3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Y'all, Last year a peach tree that grew from a pit which sprouted in our garden 5 or 6 years ago, blossomed in abundance last spring. The tree was literally covered with blooms which were all pollenated and the developing friuit had to be thinned aggressively. We had a bumper crop of delicious, large and juicy peaches.

But this spring, that same tree had a total of about 2 dozen blossoms, all on the same side of the tree (the west).  They all seemed to be pollenated and the fruit started to develop. Then about 3 weeks ago we had high winds and large hail (some said it was a small tornado).  Only about a dozen remained on the tree immediately after the storm. But since then all but 5 have fallen off!

The tree seems to be quite healthy with lots of fresh growth all over and very little "leaf curl". (Leaves I see with it, I'm pulling off.) But I'm puzzled with the very sparse blossoming.  Any explanation for this or any way to improve it next season?

Here's a few pics...
(1)-June-2018-healthy-peach-tree-but-sparse-fruit.JPG
[Thumbnail for (1)-June-2018-healthy-peach-tree-but-sparse-fruit.JPG]
(2)-Peaches-1-2.JPG
[Thumbnail for (2)-Peaches-1-2.JPG]
(3)-Peach-3.JPG
[Thumbnail for (3)-Peach-3.JPG]
(4)-Peach-4.JPG
[Thumbnail for (4)-Peach-4.JPG]
 
pollinator
Posts: 540
Location: Southern Arizona. Zone 8b
72
bee bike fish greening the desert solar woodworking
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It's not uncommon for stone fruit trees to produce every other year.  Basically if they produce too much at one time they can exhaust the trees resources so much that it doesn't have enough to produce much fruit the next year.

Some advice on how to control biennial bearing:
What Is Biennial Bearing: Information On Alternate Bearing Of Fruit Trees

 
Bruce Woodford
Posts: 161
Location: S. Ontario, Canada
3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks Peter! Very helpful info!
 
pollinator
Posts: 760
Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
10
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It could have been frost or a freeze that knocked out the blooms on the other side. A freeze can freeze the buds before the blooms open.
 
steward
Posts: 4399
Location: Zones 2-4 Wyoming and 4-5 Colorado
261
bee books forest garden fungi greening the desert hugelkultur
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Ya Bruce My two trees in Denver do the same thing. This year the squirrels have been "pruning" the fruit for me. They are not even waiting for the fruit to get ripe! Anyway I am lucky to have fruit every three to four years. If it isn't the animals it is snow, hail, frost, etc.
 
Ken W Wilson
pollinator
Posts: 760
Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
10
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Yeah, squirrels are aweful. If they’d eat the whole thing they couldn’t do so much damage, but they only want the tiny seed in the pit.
 
Miles Flansburg
steward
Posts: 4399
Location: Zones 2-4 Wyoming and 4-5 Colorado
261
bee books forest garden fungi greening the desert hugelkultur
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks Ken, I had not thought of that but it makes a lot of sense!
 
Posts: 23
Location: Palominas, az
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have a 40 ft "volunteer" peach tree. The peaches take forever to ripen. They are still completely green in July!
The birds don't wait for ripening, they peck holes, then the bees, wasps and beetles start in on the holes. If I want to eat a peach I have to chew around the bad parts. Thats if I can find some that actually had time to ripen.
I usually just pick up what's on the ground, cut off the good parts and freeze in small one serving zip locks to make compote for French toast.
 
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!