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Best Bee Food  RSS feed

 
Posts: 539
Location: Athens, GA/Sunset, SC
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My clover and buckwheat duel for popularity by the bee's judgement, but I'm not not one to judge. I'm happy to see them on my scrap of land since there's been quite a lot of colonies collapsing in recent years..

I figured I'd share these photos from today and I encourage others to share your photos of plants that bees are fond of as well (with bees present is always nice...)

I hope to see some good samples..

Peace with all -




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Posts: 74
Location: Vancouver, WA
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bee duck food preservation forest garden fungi trees
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beautiful!  the honeybees that live with us are really into turnip, kale and mustard flowers right now.  i'll try to get some pictures up.
 
pollinator
Posts: 10118
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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Elderberry!



Beebalm!

 
Posts: 97
Location: suburbs of Chicago USDA zone 5b
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I don't have any pictures, but my bees went crazy over the creeping charlie when it was blooming.
 
George Lee
Posts: 539
Location: Athens, GA/Sunset, SC
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Nice Ludi.. I dig both those plants.. I drink elderberry juice all the time and beebalm is an excellent '4th sister'... Thanks for the photos -
 
Jahnavi Veronica
Posts: 74
Location: Vancouver, WA
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bee duck food preservation forest garden fungi trees
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bees on the turnip flowers!
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George Lee
Posts: 539
Location: Athens, GA/Sunset, SC
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Good lookin' buggers... I literally light up when I see bees all over the things I planted explicitly for them,and others..

 
steward
Posts: 8019
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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I love any plant that the bees can feed upon.  One of the reasons that the clovers are so critical to the bee population, is that in most regions it is the first bloom of spring that can get them producing again, after a long, quiet winter.  Clovers used to grow wild alongside every rural road in the country, but county road crews think they are doing the world a favor by mowing them before they get a chance to reseed.  Ho-hum.
 
Mother Tree
Posts: 10523
Location: Portugal
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This is some kind of 'wild' bee happily rolling around in the wild Cistus flowers scattering pollen everywhere.  I think this behaviour is why bees like mason bees are more effective pollinators - they are literally coated with pollen!




And this is yet another type of wild bee - a lovely silvery coloured one - enjoying a (domestic) Phacelia tanacetifolia flower. 



There seem to be an incredible number of different types of wild bee in Portugal, including huge hairy ones that I always want to adopt as flying teddy bears, and tiny little solitary miner bees who seem to like digging holes right where I want to walk. 
 
pollinator
Posts: 422
Location: Zone 8b: SW Washington
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I don't recall the name of this plant but it is a pretty common landscaping plant that you can find at Lowe's.  The bees sure love it.









Here you can see some of the pollen flying.  The bees work at a frenetic pace, it was pretty hard to get a decent photo.

 
George Lee
Posts: 539
Location: Athens, GA/Sunset, SC
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Nice, keep the photos and descriptions comin'!
 
                        
Posts: 107
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Hi, I wish I'd taken a photo on a sunny day.  Today was ~70 degrees F and grey skies, so the bees were not out in numbers.  In a 50 sq ft area there were perhaps a hundred honeybees all over these plants (edit: on a sunny day!).  A lot of diversity: wasps, smaller beas, mason bees, a lot more insects I don't know the name for.

Do you know the name of this plant?  It grows about 4' high.  I'm down in zone 6b.





 
gardener
Posts: 582
Location: Lower Mainland British Columbia Canada Zone 8a/ Manchester Jamaica
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I feel so empty not coming to game day with photos, but I do follow my bee's and can spot them in a neighbour's yard no problem.
When it comes to local plant's that I see them putting a hurting on, I have to say buttercup's are holding down the fort! Salmon Berry, Black Berry, Lingon Berry, wild rose. Everything else was man planted that I see them tackling secondary to those. I can only dig in the bush on rainy day's because one step into the buttercup's and I'm told I'm messing up a good thing. Oh and bugle I've seen them in the rain working the bugle's to sleep.  On the flip side my honey bee's havn't touched the lupin's, comfrey, and herb robert. Those seem to be bumble bee favorite's as there on em from sun up to sun down. This thread is making me want to skip a day of farming and break out the macro lens badly.
 
George Lee
Posts: 539
Location: Athens, GA/Sunset, SC
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Thanks for chiming in Saybain, Let's see your macro shots...I'm waiting...:- )
Peace -
 
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