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Venison prosciutto question  RSS feed

 
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Hello everyone -

I’m brand new to this site and was hoping you all could provide me some advice. I’m curing venison prosciutto roughly following this recipe

https://thebigfatmushroomhunter.wordpress.com/2014/09/19/venison-prosciutto/

The leg has been hanging in my basement for 6 months now encased in the wax. There is one part of the leg that is softening under the wax. When I push on the wax it gives more than other parts and makes a slight squishing sound. There are also about three very small needle sized holes around the leg that are oozing a bit of reddish liquid. Should I be concerned? I’m wondering if I should remove the wash and inspect the softening part of the leg or just ride it out.

Thanks for your help!

Gabe
 
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This is fascinating. Looking at the link you posted it seems that the meat should be dry prior to the waxing. If its leaking i would conclude that its not dry or doing something to cause the leak(rotting). I have no firsthand knowledge though.  Just reading between the lines.
 
Gabe Bell
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Thanks Wayne. Would you open up wax to inspect? I did hang it uncovered for two months prior to waxing and it got pretty hard and lost a lot of moisture.
 
wayne fajkus
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I don't think it would hurt as its easy enough to recoat.
 
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I'm not familiar with this recipe, but I agree you need to break in there and check it out.  I think I'd chill the whole thing if you can, then break off the wax and cut away any spoiled meat.

I'm worried the meat wasn't salted enough.  When I made pork prosciutto, I packed the leg in salt in a cooler, then dumped out lots of fluid that had been pulled from the leg, then repacked in dry salt, then dumped out fluid, etc, etc multiple times. This before I hung it up to dry, wrapped in many layers of cheese cloth to keep out bugs.

If you break off the wax, you should be able to re-melt it (be careful, beeswax will combust when it hits the right temperature) and re-use it to coat your prosciutto in progress.  Filtering out bits would be nice, you may have success washing the cold chunks in water to remove debris.
 
Gabe Bell
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Ok - so I cracked off all the wax and good news - there is no rot! However, the leg is very moist and soft. I'm thinking I should resalt it for a week or two to extract more moisture before recoating it in wax to hang and mature. THoughts?
 
Julia Winter
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I agree.  Maybe it was just all the remaining liquid gathered at the bottom, so that area was soft. 
 
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Great thread folks. Very useful stuff.

Anyone using Sea90 as the salt? I was planning on using the salt on the fields after curing and getting damp, and I assume that's cool because it is just a sea salt, but I know the Sea90 is a little more mineral rich than other salts because of where and how it is obtained.

Any way this is a bad idea that people can think of?
 
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