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ID: similar to goldenrod but in the shade

 
gardener
Posts: 1029
Location: Northern Italy
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found this guy in the back part of the land we're managing. new to me.
it has the shape and stem of goldenrod, but it seems to grow in the shade better.
thanks for the help,
W
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pollinator
Posts: 423
Location: Upstate SC
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Looks like a milkweed (Asclepias species), check for milky sap.
 
Posts: 1
Location: Orchard, NE, United States
hugelkultur bee woodworking
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I'm not familiar with the plants of northern Italy, but if I came across this plant in my backyard I would investigate the different Pokeweeds in the area. The seed pods aren't correct for milkweed. Do a Google search on "pokeweed", and be careful with plants you don't know.
 
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That's pokeweed. The root is poisonous. Some people eat the young shoots but it can be difficult to be sure unless you know what you're doing.  It is perennial and will spread. Best to remove and keep under control. Plants can grow to be 9 feet tall!
 
Posts: 79
Location: Vermont
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according to this plant identification site on face book https://www.facebook.com/groups/156706504394635/?multi_permalinks=1920960411302560¬if_id=1532058209995139¬if_t=group_highlights  it is Lysimachia vulgaris, the garden loosestrife, yellow loosestrife, or garden yellow loosestrife with fruit and seed.  Google it for more info.  I have found the facebook page to be quite accurate.  It is not a chat page...just plant id with botanical name from photo.
 
Posts: 108
Location: Youngstown, Ohio
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Picture this app suggests lysimachia davurica (a loosestrife) as well.
 
pollinator
Posts: 643
Location: SW Missouri, Zone 7a
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BeeDee marshall wrote:according to this plant identification site on face book https://www.facebook.com/groups/156706504394635/?multi_permalinks=1920960411302560¬if_id=1532058209995139¬if_t=group_highlights  it is Lysimachia vulgaris, the garden loosestrife, yellow loosestrife, or garden yellow loosestrife with fruit and seed.  Google it for more info.  I have found the facebook page to be quite accurate.  It is not a chat page...just plant id with botanical name from photo.



I'm thinking loosestrife as well, but that is only a guess. I looked it up and found that it grows throughout Europe and the Meditteranean region, so it probably grows in Italy. It's hard to tell if this is Lysimachia vulgaris or the Lysimachia vulgaris, var. davurica The petioles seem longer than in Lysimachia vulgaris, but it is really hard to find the davurica variety to compare. Also, the buds seem rounder and more fruit-like in your photo but maybe yours have already bloomed and those are the seed capsules? Anyway ... here are some shots of Lysimachia vulgaris .

Lysimachia vulgaris
and and close-ups of the buds


 
Mike Turner
pollinator
Posts: 423
Location: Upstate SC
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First question, are those round things developing fruit or unopened flower buds? Can't tell from the photo resolution. This plant is opposite leaved.  Pokeweed (Phytolacca americana) is alternate leaved.  Also the flower cluster on this plant is a panicle, whereas pokeweed has its flowers/fruit in a tight raceme.  Could be a Lysimachia whose flowers haven't opened yet, but definitely doesn't look like Lysimachia fruit.
 
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People get sick for many reasons. Some have genetic predispositions. Most of the time is boils down to this; exposure to toxins that trigger a reaction in the cells or accumulated toxins (ama); without a good pathway to exit (stagnation/blockages); improper nutrition - either not enough nutrients being absorbed, or too much nutrition that is not broken down and basically putrifies in the intestines; and other imbalances, etc. etc.

The lymph is a circulatory system like blood but without a heart to pump it. It distributes some nutrients, but mostly takes away debris from immunological battles and waste at a cellular level. In 85%+ people in this country have stagnant lymph. Yes poke root (and the berries and the sap from a broken stem) is poisonous when improperly prepared or handled BUT it is hands down one of the best lymphatic mover/cleansers on the planet. Arabinogalactin is good, but can be drying and you need the moisture to keep things moving. Poke root tincture, PROPERLY PREPARED can be used as a brilliant adjunct treatment for cancer.

Please, properly prepared, poke is your FRIEND. Even if you don't have anything appearing with symptoms right now, one or two drops, one to three times a day for intervals at a time (yes that is right, drops, depending upon how dilute the tincture is) will work prophylactically to keep your lymph happily moving and removing.

 
William James
gardener
Posts: 1029
Location: Northern Italy
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I think loosestrife it is!

The pods were unopened flowers it seems. Here's another pic, not great but shows the flower.
Thanks everyone!
W
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